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Full text of "Announcements"

SSOCIATION OF 



CHOOLS 



Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
Garrett-Ev angelical Theological Seminai 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville/ Lombard Theological School 
Mundelein Seminary 
North Park Theological Seminary * 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 
Trinity Evangelical Divtntty Sr.Hnn- 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
19 9 7-1 9 9 8 



CONTENTS 

Association of Chicago Theological Schools 1 

The Member Seminaries 2 
Common Council 13 
Faculty Area Groups 13 

Clusters and Cooperative Activities 1 7 

Northside Chicago Theological Institute 17 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools 17 

World Mission Institute 18 

ACTS Doctor of Ministry in Preaching Program 18 

ACTS Travel Study Opportunities 1 8 

Hispanic Ministries Program 20 

Hyde Park Joint Pan-African Ministries Program 20 

ACTS Urban Clinical Pastoral Education Program 20 

The Center for Religion and the News Media 21 

Chicago Center for Global Ministries 21 

The Center for Ethics and Values at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 22 

Doctor of Ministry with a Religious Education Specialization 22 

Noncredit Language Courses 23 

Cooperating Institutions 24 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 24 
Centro para Desarrollo Comunitario y Liderato 24 
Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 25 
Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies 25 
Women's Place Resource Center 26 

The ACTS Library Council 27 

1997 Summer Programs 29 

Academic Calendars 34 

Information about Course Listings 40 

Courses 44 (A complete outline is given on page 118.) 





Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Biblical Studies 


44 


69 


92 


Historical Studies 


49 


74 


96 


Theological Studies 


52 


76 


98 


Ethical Studies 


56 


80 


101 


Religion and Society Studies 


57 


82 


102 


World Mission Studies 


57 


83 


103 


History of Religions 


59 


83 


104 


Ministry Studies 


59 


84 


104 



Special Areas of Interest within Courses of Study 1 1 2 

African American Studies, Asian Studies, Cross-Cultural Studies, Hispanic 
Studies, Judaic Studies, Studies in Eco-Justice,Urban and Public Policy Studies, 
Women's Studies, Chicago Center for Global Ministries 

Evening/Weekend and Intensive Courses 1 1 8 
ACTS Personnel 123 

Faculty and Executive Officers; Librarians 

Locations of ACTS Schools 1 48 

Catalog Editor: Barbara Hofmaier 



Association 

OF 

Chicago Theological Schools 



The Association of Chicago Theological Schools, known as ACTS, was formed in 1984 by 
12 theological schools located in or near Chicago to provide means for cooperation among 
the member institutions in the areas of student cross-registration, library access and acqui- 
sitions, interchange among faculty members in the disciplines of theological education, 
and communications between the schools. Prior to 1 984, these schools had had many years 
of successful ecumenical cooperation, primarily through the Chicago Cluster of Theologi- 
cal Schools, the Chicago Theological Institute, and the Library Council. In addition to 
ACTS, various agreements between two or more institutions further cooperation on the 
basis of geographic proximity or an interest in specific programs (see pp. 17-23). 

All 1 1 schools that currently make up ACTS are accredited members of the Association of 
Theological Schools in the United States and Canada. Each is affiliated with or sponsored by 
a denomination, a diocese, a religious organization, or several religious orders. Each offers 
professional degree programs for ministry at the master's and doctoral levels, and most also 
offer other academic degrees. All offer a variety of opportunities for continuing education for 
clergy and lay leaders, as well as conferences, lectures, and other programs of interest to a 
wider public. 

Together, the schools within ACTS offer a rich network of resources for theological 
education, making the association one of the outstanding centers of theological education 
in the world. Available to the approximately 3,000 students currently enrolled at its mem- 
ber schools is a faculty of over 350, over 1 ,000 courses offered annually, and library collec- 
tions of over 1.6 million volumes and nearly 5,000 currently received periodical subscrip- 
tions. Several schools have well-stocked theological bookstores. In addition, ACTS makes 
it possible for students and faculty to pursue their work, study, and reflection in interaction 
with people from many different cultural and theological traditions. 

Students in ACTS schools also have access to other resources pertinent to theological 
education through institutions related to ACTS (see pp. 24-26). Many also draw on the vast 
resources of other institutions of higher education and the numerous religious organizations 
and agencies in the Chicago area related to one or more of the institutions in ACTS. 

ACTS itself does not offer either courses or degrees. Application for enrollment must be 
made to one of the member institutions. 

An essential tool for cross-registration purposes, this catalog also includes information 
on the many resources for theological education available to students enrolled in the mem- 
ber schools of ACTS. 

The current chairperson of ACTS is Neal F. Fisher of Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. Kurt Gabbard of McCormick Theological Seminary is treasurer. Inquiries regard- 
ing ACTS should be directed to Neal Fisher, President, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Semi- 
nary, 2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60201-3298; phone: 847-866-3900. 



THE MEMBER SEMINARIES 

Catholic Theological Union 

A collaborative school serving 33 religious orders, founded to promote diverse theological 
and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Emphasis on preparation 
for ministry, hence flexible academic patterns augmented by strong field education pro- 
grams. Other special features: D.Min. concentrations in cross-cultural ministries, liturgy, 
or spirituality; fully individualized research or general academic M.A.; M.Div. concentra- 
tions in Bible, pastoral theology, world mission, or word and worship; World Mission 
Program designed to prepare American and international students to minister in other 
cultures; studies in African American and Hispanic ministry. Programs open to all serious 
students, men and women. 



President 

Vice President and Academic Dean 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Dean of Students and Community Services 

Director of D. Min. Program 

Director of M. Div. Program 

Director of M. A. Program 

Director of MA. P. S. Program 

Director of Continuing Education 

Director of Admissions and Recruitment 

Registrar 



Norman Bevan, C.S.Sp. 

Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. 

TBA 

Virginia Piecuch 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 

Kevin Madigan 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. 

Eleanor Holland, I.B.V.M. 

KeirenO'Kelly 

JoAnn McCaffrey 



Degree Programs 

MAPS. 

M.Div. 

M.A. in Theology 

D.Min. (5 years in ministry prerequisite) 



CATHOLIC 

THEOLOGICAL UNION 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60615-5698 

773-324-8000 

Fax 773-324-4360 



President's office: 773-753-5309 

Academic Dean's office: 773-753-5307 

Registrar's office: 773-753-5320 



Chicago Theological Seminary 

An ecumenical seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering rigorous 
theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and professional integrity 
in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. The basic professional degree program is the 
three-year Master of Divinity, but the Master of Arts in Religious Studies may be awarded at 
the end of the second year as a terminal master's degree. The post-M.Div. Doctor of Ministry 
is available for full- or part-time students with experience in ministry. Joint programs with pastoral 
care institutions and a dual degree program with the School of Social Service Administration of the 
University of Chicago are available. The Ph.D. programs focus on Christian- Jewish relations and on 
theology, ethics, and the human sciences. 



President 

Academic Dean 

Registrar and Director of Studies 

Director of Recruitment, Admissions, and 

Financial Planning 
Director of Development 
Vice President for Business Affairs 



Kenneth B.Smith 

William R. Myers 

Cheryl W. Miller 

Veronica O'Neill Morrison 

Michael S. Glass 
Peter M.Wynn 



Degree Programs 

M.A. in Religious Studies 

M.Div. 

S.T.M. 

D.Min. 

Ph.D. 




5757 South University Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60637-9990 

773-752-5757 
Fax 773-752-0905 



President's office: 773-752-5757 ext. 223 

Academic Dean's office: 773-752-5757 ext. 224 

Registrar's office: 773-752-5757 ext. 227 



Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

Garrett-Evangelical is a graduate divinity school of the United Methodist Church. While 
the majority of the faculty and the students are affiliated with the school's denominational 
heritage, the seminary is ecumenical in religious and educational approaches. The cur- 
ricula emphasize theory and practice; they include the institutional emphases on the church 
and the black experience, peace and justice, and women in ministry. The basic programs 
lead to the Master of Divinity, Master of Christian Education, or Master of Theological 
Studies degrees. The advanced professional program leads to the Doctor of Ministry de- 
gree, while the joint program with Northwestern University leads to the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degree. 



President 

Dean and Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Director of the Ph. D. Program 

Vice President for Administration 

Vice President for Development 

Director of Academic Studies and Registrar 

Director of Admissions 



Neal F. Fisher 

Jack L. Seymour 

Jack L. Seymour 

Adolf M. Hansen 

David L. Heetland 

Margaret A. Magee 

Kelly Dahlman-Oeth 



Degree Programs 

M.Div. 
MCE. 
M.T.S. 
M.A.M.M. 



Master's/M.S.J. (dual program with Northwestern University) 
Master's/M.S.W. (dual program with Loyola University) 
D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 
Ph.D. (joint program with Northwestern University) 




2121 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, 1L 60201-3298 

847-866-3900 

Fax 847-866-3957 



President's office: 847-866-3902 

Dean's office: 847-866-3903 
Registrar's office: 847-866-3907 



Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, aca- 
demic study of theology. The M.Div. curriculum features a strong accent upon study of the 
traditions of the church and a comprehensive field work program, with special emphasis 
on cross-cultural ministry and global awareness. Opportunities offered for specialization 
in Hispanic ministries and in ministry and social work and for coordinated M.Div./Ph.D. 
degrees (with the University of Chicago). 



President 

Dean 

Executive Vice President 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Interim Dean of the Community 

Director of Admissions 

Director, Hispanic Ministries Program 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

and Extension Education 
Director of M.A. Program 
Registrar 



William E. Lesher 

Ralph W.Klein 

Sarah M. Stegemoeller 

Joseph L. Rodrick 

Connie Miller 

Marilyn Olson 

Jose David Rodriguez 

Mark Thomsen 

Robert L. Conrad 

KurtK.Hendel 
Patricia Bartley 



Degree Programs 

M.A. 
M.Div. 



Th.M./Ph.D. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 




1100 East 55th Street 

Chicago, IL 60615-5199 

773-256-0700 

Fax 773-256-0782 

http://www.lstc.edu 

President's office: 773-256-0728 

Dean's office: 773-256-0721 
Registrar's office: 773-256-0717 



To send e-mail to any faculty or staff member, use the person 's 
first initial and up to seven letters of the last name plus lstc.edu. 



McCormick Theological Seminary 

McCormick is a theological center for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It also welcomes 
many students from outside this denomination. Focusing its resources on education for the 
ministry, it emphasizes both preprofessional (M.A.T.S. and M.Div.) and professional (D.Min.) 
studies. Its programs in Hispanic ministries, Korean American ministries, African American 
ministries, women's studies, and urban ministry, its dual competency programs in social work 
and other fields, and its emphasis on internationalization add to its other offerings. Students 
are encouraged to plan, with advice, their own courses of study. 



President 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and 

Dean of the Faculty 
Dean of Masters Programs 
Associate Dean for Experiential Education 
Director of Doctoral Programs and 

Continuing Education 
Director, Korean American Ministries Program 
Director, Hispanic Ministries Program 
Director, African American Ministries Program 
Vice President for Student Affairs 
Recruitment and Admissions Officer 
Registrar 

Vice President for Finance and Operations 
Vice President for Funds Development 



Cynthia M. Campbell 
Heidi Hadsell 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. 
Deborah F. Mullen 
David V. Esterline 

VictorS. Yoon 

David Cortes-Fuentes 

Sandra K. Edwards 

Mary Paik 

TBA 

Jane Brawley 

Kurt Gabbard 

TBA 



Degree Programs 

M.Div. 

M.Div/M.S.W. 



M.A. in Theological Studies 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 




5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637-1692 

773-947-6300 

Fax 773-947-0376 



President's office: 773-947-6301 

Dean's office: 773-947-6306 
Registrar's office: 773-947-6285 



Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

Meadville/Lombard is an independent theological school affiliated with the University of 
Chicago and with the Unitarian Universalist Association. The mission of the school includes 
empowerment of liberal religious congregations and voluntary associations through prepar- 
ing men and women for ministry, religious education, and community outreach. Meadville/ 
Lombard's educational process includes teaching, research, critical reflection and institu- 
tional outreach, and dialogue with persons of non-Christian faiths. The school offers the 
M.Div., D.Min. (in sequence), and the M.A. in Religious Education degrees and is accredited. 

Interim Academic Dean and Chief Executive Officer Ian S . Evison 

Librarian NeilW.Gerdes 

Registrar/Director for Student and Academic Cecelia E. Smith 

Services/Financial Aid Officer 

Dean of Students Michelle Bentley 

Business Manager Randall Vaughn 

Development Officer Susan Grider 

Admissions Officer Ellen Severson 

Degree Programs 

M.A. in Religious Education 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (in sequence) 




5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60637-1602 

773-753-3195 
Fax 773-753-1323 

President's office: 773-753-1326 

Dean's office: 773-753-1326 
Registrar's office: 773-753-3282 



Mundelein Seminary 

of the University of St. Mary of the Lake 

With roots in a charter granted over 140 years ago, Mundelein Seminary of the University 
of St. Mary of the Lake prepares candidates academically, formationally, and spiritually 
for the Roman Catholic priesthood. As a canonically erected Pontifical Theological Fac- 
ulty, Mundelein Seminary of the University of St. Mary of the Lake is empowered to confer 
the bachelor, licentiate, and doctoral degrees in sacred theology. Although originally most 
of the students attending Mundelein Seminary came from the Archdiocese of Chicago, its 
alumni now include students from other dioceses in the state of Illinois and throughout the 
country. 



Rector 

Vice Rector 

Academic Dean 

Registrar 

Dean of Formation 

Director of Finance 



John F. Canary 

August J. Belauskas 

John G. Lodge 

Celia U.Wilson 

Bartholomew S. Winters 

John F. Lehocky 



Degree Programs 

M.Div. 

STB. 

S.T.L. 

D.Min. 






1000 E. Maple 

Mundelein, IL 60060-1 174 

847-566-6401 

Fax 847-566-7330 

http://www2.interaccess.com/usmlhome/usmlhome.htm 



North Park Theological Seminary 
of North Park University 

North Park Theological Seminary, founded in 1891, is the graduate school of theology of 
the Evangelical Covenant Church. It is a professional school designed to educate people 
for ministry, whether as pastors, missionaries, church educators, or trained laity. The semi- 
nary is a community of professors, students, and staff gathered not only for the purpose of 
theological study but for worship, fellowship, and the deepening of the spiritual life. The 
seminary also includes in its purposes the continuing education of ministers. It sees itself 
as a servant of the Church of Jesus Christ, and particularly of the Evangelical Covenant 
Church. 



President of the University 

President and Dean of the Seminary 

Dean of Faculty 

Assistant Dean for Academic and Student Affairs 

Associate Dean for External Programming 

Librarian 

Coordinator of Seminary Admissions 

Development Officer 

Registrar 



David G.Horner 

John E. Phelan, Jr. 

Stephen R. Graham 

James K. Bruckner 

Evelyn M. R. Johnson 

Norma S. Sutton 

Kristen Rounseville 

LeRoy L. Carlson 

Vern Blackwood 



Degree Programs 

M. Div. 

MACE. 

M.A.T.S. 

M.Div./M.B.A. 

M.Div./M.M. 



M.A.T.S./M.S.N. 
MATS/MBA. 
MATS/MM. 
D.Min. 




NorthPark 
TheologicalSeminary 

3225 W. Foster Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60625-4895 

773-244-6210 

FAX 773-244-6244 

http://www.northpark.edu/seminary 



President's office: 773-244-6214 

Faculty Dean's office: 773-244-621 1 

Registrar's office: 773-244-5560 



Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, founded in 1913, is a graduate seminary commit- 
ted to the education of men and women for leadership in the churches. Our evangelical 
heritage commits us to the Lordship of Jesus Christ and the authority of Scripture for 
informing mission and ministry in the world. The seminary is a community of faith, theo- 
logical inquiry, worship, and service, preparing persons for ordained ministries and other 
leadership roles in the church and relating Christian faith to life and vocation. The semi- 
nary is related to the American Baptist Churches, U.S.A., and welcomes students from all 
denominations and Christian traditions. 

President Ian M. Chapman 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Timothy P. Weber 

Dean of the Seminary 

Vice President for Business Administration Gary Green 
Executive Vice President for Theodore Y. Rodgers IV 

Institutional Advancement 

Acting Registrar and Director of Financial A id Curt Welsh 

Director of Supervised Ministry William R. Nelson 

Acting Director of Doctoral Studies Barbara Wixon 

Director of Hispanic Studies Osvaldo L. Mottesi 

Director of the Theodore W. Grow Center William P. Clemmons 

for the Renewal of the Churches 

Assistant to the Dean for Korean Studies James J. Sok 

Degree Programs 

MA. 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



NORTHERN 



baptist theological seminary 

660 East Butterfield Road 

Lombard, IL 60148-5698 

630-620-2100 

Fax 630-620-2194 

President's office: 630-620-2101 

Dean's office: 630-620-2103 
Registrar's office: 630-620-2105 



10 



Seabdry-Western Theological Seminary 

Seabury- Western Theological Seminary, one of 1 1 accredited seminaries of the Episcopal 
Church, is a largely residential seminary committed to providing excellence in academic 
preparation for congregational leadership. Worship, offered three times a day, is central to 
community life. The student body reflects the breadth of Anglican tradition, drawing stu- 
dents from 25 or more states each year. Located just across the street from Garrett- 
Evangelical Seminary, the two schools have joined forces to form the United Library, 
which provides an outstanding theological library of 300,000 volumes. Students studying 
at Seabury- Western experience the distinctive eclecticism that characterizes Anglicanism. 

Dean and President Mark S. Sisk 

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Newland F. Smith III 

Director of Academic Affairs Meredith Woods Potter 

Chief Financial Officer David G. Glover 

Director of Development Jane W. Strehlow 

Registrar Meredith Woods Potter 

Director of Seabury Institute Arl in J . Rothauge 

Degree Programs 

M.Div. 

M.T.S. 




2122 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, IL 60201-2938 

847-328-9300 

Fax 847-328-9624 

President's office: 847-328-9300 ext. 17 

Associate Dean's office: 847-328-9300 ext. 25 

Registrar's office: 847-328-9300 ext. 26 



11 



Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

of Trinity International University 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School is maintained by the Evangelical Free Church of 
America to educate men and women for a worldwide Christian ministry as pastors, mis- 
sionaries, teachers, and lay workers who are committed to God for a particular service for 
which they recognize a need for seminary studies. The divinity school welcomes the op- 
portunity of assisting students from all denominations and independent nondenomina- 
tional churches who are seeking preparation for fruitful Christian life and ministry. 



President 

Chancellor 

Provost 

Executive Vice President of Operations 

Senior Vice President of Education and Academic Dean 

Senior Vice President of Enrollment Management 

Senior Vice President of Student Life 

Senior Vice President of Institutional Advancement 

Vice President of Professional Doctoral Programs 

Vice President, Division of Open Studies 

Associate Academic Dean 

Associate Dean of Academic Doctoral Programs 

Director of the Ph. D. Program in Theological Studies 

Director of the Ph. D. Program in Intercultural Studies 

Director of the Ph. D Program in Education 

Director of Records 



Gregory L. Waybright 

Kenneth M. Meyer 

Nigel M. de S. Cameron 

Milo D. Lundell 

W. Bingham Hunter 

Robert S. Hansen 

Melvin D. Svendsen 

David Magnuson 

Warren S. Benson 

Mark H.Senter III 

Barry J. Beitzel 

Paul G. Hiebert 

Douglas J. Moo 

Harold A. Netl and 

Perry G. Downs 

Jeffrey J. Millenson 



Degree Programs 

M.A. (8 areas) 
M.Div. 
Th.M. 
MAR. 

M.R.E. 



D.Min. (3 years' experience prerequisite) 

Ph.D. in Education (4 years' experience prerequisite) 

Ph.D. in Intercultural Studies 

Ph.D. in Theological Studies 



"TO f kT TTVA 'INTERNATIONAL 
I Rl IN 1 1 I II U N I V E K S I T Y 

EVANGELICAL- D I VI N IT Y- SCHOOL 



2065 Half Day Road 

Deerfield, IL 60015-1283 

847-945-8800 

Fax 847-317-8141 

President's office: 847-317-8001 

Academic Dean's office: 847-317-8002 

Director of Records: 847-3 1 7-8050 



12 



COMMON COUNCIL 

OF THE 

ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



Norman Bevan, C.S.Sp. 

Kenneth B. Smith 

Neal F. Fisher 

William E. Lesher 

Cynthia M. Campbell 

Ian S. Evison 

John F. Canary 

John E. Phelan, Jr. 

Ian M. Chapman 

Mark S. Sisk 

Gregory L. Waybright 



Catholic Theological Union (CTU) 
Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (G-ETS) 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC) 
McCormick Theological Seminary (MTS) 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School (M/L) 
Mundelein Seminary (MS) 
North Park Theological Seminary (NPTS) 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary (NBTS) 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary (S-WTS) 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS) 



FACULTY AREA GROUPS 

(See pp. 123—45 for biographical data.) 



Old Testament 

Richard Averbeck (TEDS) 

Barry Beitzel (TEDS) 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) 

Phyllis Bird (G-ETS) 

James Bruckner (NPTS) 

Mary Deeley (S-WTS) 

Julie Duncan (G-ETS) 

Wesley Fuerst (LSTC) 

Theodore Hiebert (MTS) 

Leslie Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Robert Hubbard (NPTS) 

Ralph Klein (LSTC) 

Paul Koptak (NPTS) 

Andre LaCocque (CTS-Emeritus) 

Dennis Magary (TEDS) 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (NBTS) 

Claude Mariottini (NBTS) 

Walter Michel (LSTC) 

James Okoye, C.S.Sp. (CTU) 

Raymond Ortlund, Jr. (TEDS) 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) 

Wolfgang Roth (G-ETS) 

Herman Schaalmann (CTS-Adj, G-ETS-Adj.) 

Robert Schoenstene (MS) 



Ken Stone (CTS) 

Willem VanGemeren (TEDS) 

New Testament 

Linda Belleville (NPTS) 

Barbara Bowe, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Robert Brawley (MTS) 

Donald Carson (TEDS) 

Jungsik Cha (MTS-Adj.) 

Charles Cosgrove (NBTS) 

David Esterline (MTS) 

Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) 

Adolf Hansen (G-ETS) 

Estella Boggs Horning (NBTS-Affil.) 

Alan Hultberg (TEDS) 

W. Bingham Hunter (TEDS) 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) 

Edgar Krentz (LSTC) 

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU-Adj.) 

Wilhelm Linss (LSTC-Emeritus) 

John Lodge (MS) 

James Mcllhone (MS) 

Margaret Mitchell (MTS) 

Douglas Moo (TEDS) 

Grant Osborne (TEDS) 



13 



Carolyn Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 
Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 
John E. Phelan, Jr. (NPTS) 
Barbara Reid, O.P. (CTU) 
David Rhoads (LSTC) 
Barbara Rossing (LSTC) 
Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) 
Klyne Snodgrass (NPTS) 
Graydon Snyder (CTS-Adj.) 
Richard Stegner (G-ETS; NPTS-Adj.) 
Sarah Tanzer (MTS) 
Osvaldo Vena (G-ETS) 
Herold Weiss (NBTS-Affil.) 
Robert Yarbrough (TEDS) 
Khiok-Khng Yeo (G-ETS) 

Church History 

Philip Anderson (NPTS) 

Paula Datsko Barker (S-WTS) 

John Bray (NPTS) 

Alfloyd Butler (NBTS) 

David Daniels III (MTS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

John Charles Godbey (M/L-Emeritus) 

Stephen Graham (NPTS) 

Philip Harrold (S-WTS-Adj.) 

Kurt Hendel (LSTC) 

Lawrence Hennessey (MS) 

Cynthia Jurisson (LSTC) 

Richard Kieckhefer (S-WTS-Vis.) 

William Kuntze (CTS-Adj.) 

Kevin Madigan (CTU) 

Terry Mclntyre (LSTC) 

Charles Meyer (MS-Emeritus) 

Larry Murphy (G-ETS) 

Thomas Nettles (TEDS) 

Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 

Daniel Rodriguez-Diaz (MTS) 

Theodore Ross, S.J. (CTU-Adj., MS-Adj.) 

Kenneth Sawyer (MTS) 

James Stein (G-ETS) 

Timothy Weber (NBTS) 

John Woodbridge (TEDS) 

Martin Zielinski (MS) 

Theology 

Paula Datsko Barker (S-WTS) 

Robert Barron (MS) 

Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) 



Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU-Adj.) 

Harold Brown (TEDS) 

Ralph Burhoe (M/L-Emeritus) 

Sara Butler, M.S.B.T. (MS) 

Nigel Cameron (TEDS) 

Cynthia Campbell (MTS) 

Anna Case-Winters (MTS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

Ian Evison (M/L) 

John Feinberg (TEDS) 

Paul Feinberg (TEDS) 

Bruce Fields (TEDS) 

Brian Fischer (MS) 

Neal Fisher (G-ETS) 

Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) 

Stanley Grenz (NBTS-Affil.) 

James Griffiss (S-WTS-Vis.) 

Wayne Grudem (TEDS) 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Philip Hefner (LSTC) 

Carl Henry (TEDS-Vis.) 

Theodore Jennings (CTS) 

Kenneth Kantzer (TEDS) 

Leo Lefebure (MS) 

Perry LeFevre (CTS-Emeritus) 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU-Adj.) 

John McDonnell (MS) 

Charles Meyer (MS-Emeritus) 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

Thomas Parker (MTS) 

Albert Pero, Jr. (LSTC) 

Jamie Phelps, O.P. (CTU) 

Luis Rivera-Rodriguez (MTS) 

Jose David Rodriguez (LSTC) 

Rosemary Ruether (G-ETS) 

Herman Schaalmann (CTS-Adj, G-ETS-Adj.) 

Robert Schreiter, C.Pp.S. (CTU) 

Douglas Sharp (NBTS) 

Helen Theodoropoulos (S-WTS-Adj.) 

Susan Thistlethwaite (CTS) 

Linda Thomas (G-ETS) 

Franz Jozef van Beeck, S.J. (MS) 

Dwight Vogel (G-ETS) 

Andrew Wallace (LSTC-Adj.) 

Bruce Ware (TEDS) 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) 

Vitor Westhelle (LSTC) 

James Will (G-ETS) 

Henry Young (G-ETS) 



14 



Ethics 

Patrick Boyle, S.J. (MS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) 

Toinette Eugene (G-ETS) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. (CTU) 

Stanley Grenz (NBTS-Affil.) 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) 

Reinhard Hiitter (LSTC) 

John Kilner (TEDS) 

Jerome Listecki (MS) 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) 

JoAnne Terrell (CTS) 

Richard Tholin (G-ETS) 

Kenneth Vaux (G-ETS) 

Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) 

World Mission 

Martin Alphonse (G-ETS) 
Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) 
Richard Bliese (LSTC) 
Robert Coleman (TEDS) 
William Danker (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Eleanor Doidge, L.O.B. (CTU) 
Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) 
Paul Hiebert (TEDS) 
John Kaserow, M.M. (CTU-Adj.) 
David Lindberg (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Lois McKinney (TEDS) 
Harold Netland (TEDS) 
John Nyquist (TEDS) 
Michael Perry, O.F.M. (CTU-Adj.) 
John Prior, S.V.D. (CTU-Adj.) 
Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. (CTU) 
James Scherer (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. (CTU) 
Wayne Teasdale (CTU-Adj.) 
Mark Thomsen (LSTC) 
Ruth Tucker (TEDS-Vis.) 
Harold Vogelaar (LSTC-Vis.) 
Wayne Weld (NPTS) 

Ministry: Its Nature and Practice 

Michelle Bentley (M/L) 



Helen Cahill, O.P. (CTU-Adj.) 

Alva Caldwell (G-ETS) 

Richard Carlson (NPTS) 

Peter Cha (TEDS) 

Hearn Chun (MTS) 

William Clemmons (NBTS) 

Mary Lou Codman-Wilson (G-ETS-Adj.) 

Terasa Cooley (M/L-Adj.) 

David Cortes-Fuentes (MTS) 

John Dreibelbis (S-WTS) 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) 

Sandra Edwards (MTS) 

David Esterline (MTS) 

Magdelena Fabiosa, S.V.D. (CTU-Adj.) 

Mary Frohlich (CTU) 

Kendyl Gibbons (M/L-Adj.) 

Hugh Halverstadt (MTS) 

Deborah Kapp (MTS) 

Paul LaChance, O.F.M. (CTU-Adj.) 

Roy Larson (G-ETS-Adj.) 

Bruce Lescher (CTU) 

Ann Luther (CTU-Adj.) 

Veronica Mendez, R.C.D. (MS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Deborah Mullen (MTS) 

William Nelson (NBTS) 

Richard Perry (LSTC) 

Robert Price (NBTS) 

Jerold Reed (NPTS) 

Arlin Rothauge (S-WTS) 

Martha Scott (G-ETS) 

Neil Shadle (M/L) 

Kenneth Smith (CTS) 

Virginia Berglund Smith (MTS) 

John Tolley (M/L-Adj.) 

Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) 

Mark W. Wendorf (MTS) 

Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 

Richard Wojcik (MS-Emeritus) 

Victor Yoon (MTS) 

Pastoral Care 

Herbert Anderson (CTU) 
Homer Ashby, Jr. (MTS) 
Kathleen Billman (LSTC) 
Lee Butler, Jr. (CTS) 
George Cairns (CTS) 
David Dillon (TEDS) 
Ian Evison (M/L) 



15 



Judith Golz (TEDS-Vis.) 
Stephen Greggo (TEDS) 
Warren Heard, Jr. (TEDS-Adj.) 
John Hinkle (G-ETS) 
David Hogue (G-ETS) 
Ndung'u Ikenye (S-WTS-Adj.) 
Everett Jackson (NPTS) 
Emma Justes (NBTS) 
Jane Koonce (NPTS) 
David McKay (TEDS-Adj.) 
Thomas McQuaid (MS) 
Robert Moore (CTS) 
James Poling (G-ETS) 
Lallene Rector (G-ETS) 
Daniel Schipani (NBTS-Affil.) 
Linda Sevcik, S.M. (MS) 
Miriam Stark (TEDS) 
PaulWachdorf(MS) 
Bartholomew Winters (MS) 

Supervised Ministry 

Richard Carlson (NPTS) 
John Dreibelbis (S-WTS) 
Michael Green (TEDS) 
Connie Kleingartner (LSTC) 
Veronica Mendez, R.C.D. (MS) 
Deborah Mullen (MTS) 
William Nelson (NBTS) 
Martha Scott (G-ETS) 
Neil Shadle (M/L) 
Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) 
Raymond Webb (MS) 

Worship and Preaching 

Mark Bangert (LSTC) 

Michael Bullmore (TEDS) 

Ian Chapman (NBTS) 

Donald Chatfield (G-ETS) 

William Clemmons (NBTS) 

Malcolm Cornwell, C.P. (CTU-Adj.) 

John Dally (S-WTS) 

Ruth Duck (G-ETS) 

Royce Eckhardt (NPTS- Adj.) 

Robert Finster (S-WTS) 

Brian Fischer (MS) 

Edward Foley, Capuchin (CTU) 

Richard Fragomeni (CTU) 

Mark Francis, C.S.V. (CTU) 



Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Richard Jensen (LSTC-Vis.) 

Paul Koptak (NPTS) 

David Larsen (TEDS-Emeritus) 

Paul Manz (LSTC-Emeritus) 

Ruth Meyers (S-WTS) 

Morris Niedenthal (LSTC-Emeritus) 

Carol Noren (NPTS) 

Theodore Olsen (TEDS) 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Arturo Perez (CTU-Adj.) 

Daniel Siwek (MS) 

Dwight Vogel (G-ETS) 

Robert Webber (NBTS-Affil.) 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) 

Religious Education 

Warren Benson (TEDS) 
Bobbi Bower (NPTS-Adj.) 
Paul Bramer (NPTS) 
Elizabeth Caldwell (MTS) 
Linda Cannell (TEDS) 
William Clemmons (NBTS) 
Robert Conrad (LSTC) 
John Dally (S-WTS) 
Perry Downs (TEDS; NPTS-Adj.) 
Richard Dunn (TEDS) 
Alan Forsman (NPTS-Adj.) 
M. Susan Harlow (M/L) 
Evelyn Johnson (NPTS-Adj.) 
Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) 
Judith Mannheim (M/L) 
William Myers (CTS) 
Diane Olson (G-ETS- Adj.) 
Charles Sell (TEDS) 
Mark Senter (TEDS) 
Jack Seymour (G-ETS) 
Linda Vogel (G-ETS) 
Richard Walsh (CTU-Adj.) 
Ted Ward (TEDS) 
Charles Wysong (NPTS-Adj.) 

Canon Law 

Carol Amadio (S-WTS-Adj.) 
John Dolciamore (MS- Adj.) 
John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) 



16 



CLUSTERS AND COOPERATIVE ACTIVITIES 

Northside Chicago Theological Institute 

The Northside Chicago Theological Institute (NCTI) was organized in 1971 for educa- 
tional and ecumenical purposes by five theological schools: Garrett-Evangelical Theologi- 
cal Seminary, North Park Theological Seminary, Seabury- Western Theological Seminary, 
Mundelein Seminary, and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

The schools are located on the north side of the greater Chicago area, with one in 
Chicago, two on contiguous campuses in Evanston adjacent to Northwestern University, 
one in Deerfield, and one in Mundelein. 

The activities of the NCTI are under the direction of a board of directors whose offic- 
ers are elected biennially. From its beginning the NCTI has emphasized the importance of 
student representation on its boards and committees. The NCTI sponsors two academic 
courses each year. 

A three-hour fall seminar, The Church and Its Mission, explores the views of several 
major Christian communions on this theme. Meetings will be held on Wednesday, October 1 
(7:00-9:00 p.m.), and on the weekends of October 17-18 and November 7-8 (from 4:00 p.m. 
Friday until 4:00 p.m. Saturday). Further information can be obtained from Sister Sara But- 
ler, M.S.B.T., Coordinator, at MS; phone: 847-970-4868. 

In January each member school of NCTI observes the Week of Prayer for Christians 
through activities appropriate to its own tradition. Exchange of pulpit speakers has proven 
enriching for the schools. 

The spring seminar, also offered annually as a three-hour course, has addressed various 
theological themes in Christian spirituality and practice. The seminar has focused on the 
diversity of ways in which Christians of many traditions understand prayer and life in the 
Spirit. In its present format the seminar includes two overnight, intensive retreat experiences 
on the campus of Mundelein Seminary (1998 dates: April 17-18, 24-25). Registration for the 
seminar is limited. A minimal fee is requested of student participants. Further information 
regarding the Prayer and Life in the Spirit seminar can be obtained from Professor John 
Weborg, Coordinator, at NPTS, phone: 773-244-6231, or from Professor Mary Katherine 
Deeley, NCTI Executive Secretary; phone: 847-446-8223. 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools 

The five ACTS schools located in Hyde Park (Catholic Theological Union, Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Semi- 
nary, and Meadville/Lombard Theological School) and the Divinity School of the Univer- 
sity of Chicago identify themselves as the Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools. The 
cluster seeks ways to deepen academic cooperation and sharing beyond those made pos- 
sible by the ACTS structure. 

The purposes of the cluster are to ( 1 ) promote academic cooperation among the schools 
in Hyde Park; (2) foster dialogue and scholarship among its faculties through support of 
discipline groups and interdisciplinary colloquies; (3) develop support for academic pro- 
grams through cooperative student services, recruitment, and language programs; and (4) 

17 



aid in communication and planning among the member institutions. 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools is administered by a committee con- 
sisting of the chief academic officers of the six schools. For 1996-97 the chair of this 
committee was Ralph W. Klein of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago; phone: 
773-256-0721. The chief executive officers of the cooperating institutions serve as an ad- 
visory board to the committee, especially in areas related to institutional planning. 

World Mission Institute 

The World Mission Institute ( WMI) is an annual three-day conference held on the last week- 
end in April; it has been sponsored since 1970 by member schools of ACTS, along with 
several other educational and mission organizations, and is administered by the Chicago 
Center for Global Ministries. Each year outstanding international speakers and resource per- 
sons deal with a significant aspect of Christian world mission. The 1997 WMI had as its 
theme "Science and Technology: Friend and Foe of Mission." The 1998 WMI is scheduled for 
April 23-25, with the tentative theme "The Family in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Source and 
Focus of Mission." 

All students and faculty of ACTS schools are invited to participate in the WMI with- 
out registration charges. Inquiries regarding WMI should be addressed to the Chicago 
Center for Global Ministries, 5401 South Cornell Avenue, Chicago, IL 60615; phone: 
773-363-1342; fax: 773-324-4360; e-mail: ccgminstry@aol.com. 

ACTS Doctor of Ministry in Preaching Program 

A Doctor of Ministry in Preaching degree is offered by a group of six ACTS schools as an 
accepted program of the association. The six schools are Chicago Theological Seminary, 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, North Park 
Theological Seminary, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Seabury- Western Theo- 
logical Seminary. The program is ecumenical and cross-disciplinary in its design. The 
curriculum includes three summer residencies of three weeks each in Chicago, two preaching 
ministry projects, and a final thesis. Each student's program is tailored to his or her needs 
in consultation with a supervisor and peers in the residency, as well as with a parish 
advisory committee. Interested persons should contact Richard Jensen, Dean of the Pro- 
gram, or Ruth Frey, Director, ACTS D.Min. in Preaching Program, 5555 South Woodlawn, 
Chicago, IL 60637; phone: 773-947-6270. 

ACTS Travel Study Opportunities 

Opportunities to travel and study outside Chicago are offered for course credit by several 
ACTS schools; they are listed below by geographic area. Students from CTU, LSTC, and 
MTS may contact the office of the Chicago Center for Global Ministries (see p. 21) for full 
details about programs and funding. 

Africa. LSTC offers to students on a yearly basis overseas exchange opportunities in 
Africa. For more information contact Richard Bliese at the CCGM office, 773-363-1342. 

Appalachia. The CCGM-sponsored course Cross-Cultural Quarter will focus on the 
dynamics of cross-cultural ministry within an ecumenical setting. The centerpiece of the 
course is a three-week trip to Appalachia August 28-September 20, 1997. Preparation and 

18 



debriefing sessions are also part of the course, scheduled for August 21-22 and September 
23-25. For more information, contact Stephen Bevans or Richard Bliese at 773-363-1342. 

Eastern Europe. LSTC periodically offers students internships in Eastern Europe. 
For information contact Connie Kleingartner, LSTC; phone: 773-256-0746. 

Germany. The Collegium Oecumenicum in northern Munich, Germany, offers LSTC 
students the chance to live and study for up to a year among a community of 50 students from 
Germany and other parts of the world. Students do their academic work at the University of 
Munich. Students may register for the winter semester (November to February) and/or the 
summer semester (May to August). Students from other ACTS schools who are interested in 
this program should contact Reinhard Hiitter, LSTC; phone: 773-256-0760. 

Ghana. The CCGM-sponsored course Cross-Cultural Quarter will focus on the dy- 
namics of cross-cultural ministry within an ecumenical setting. The centerpiece of the 
course is a three-week trip to Ghana August 28-September 20, 1997. Preparation and 
debriefing sessions are also part of the course, scheduled for August 21-22 and September 
23-25. For more information, contact Stephen Bevans or Richard Bliese at 773-363-1342. 

Greece. CTU offers the study tour "Churches of Paul" to sites of early Christian 
communities in Greece June 28-July 1 1, 1998. Sites to be visited include Athens, Corinth, 
Philippi, Thessaloniki, Vergina, Meteora, Delphi, Corinth, Mykonos, and Delos. In addi- 
tion to the study of archaeology and early church history, biblical study will focus on St. 
Paul and Acts of the Apostles. For more information contact Barbara Bowe or Marianne 
Race, CTU; phone: 773-753-5355. 

Israel. CTU offers a program in Israel June 12-28, 1998, as an opportunity to reflect 
prayerfully on the Scriptures in the Holy Land. Orientation to biblical sites and reflection 
on Scripture are led by a member of CTU's Department of Biblical Literature and Lan- 
guages. For applications, contact Marianne Race, CTU; phone: 773-753-5355. 

CTU will offer a second Israel program May 27-June 17, 1999, as a three-week inten- 
sive with guided exploration of biblical and historical sites. A prerequisite for the seminar 
is B 475, History and Archaeology of Israel. Participants receive three quarter credits for 
the trip. Application forms are available from Marianne Race, CTU; phone: 773-753-5355. 

Japan. M/L can arrange special exchanges to Tsakuba University in Japan. Knowl- 
edge of Japanese is required. For more information, contact Ian Evison, M/L; phone: 
773-753-1326. 

Middle East. LSTC and Evangelicals for Middle East Understanding jointly provide 
short trips each year to various sites in the Middle East (including Israel, Palestine, and 
Turkey) for the purpose of studying Muslim-Christian relations. For more information, con- 
tact Richard Bliese at the CCGM office; phone: 773-363-1342. 

South Dakota. The CCGM-sponsored course Cross-Cultural Quarter will focus on 
the dynamics of cross-cultural ministry within an ecumenical setting. The centerpiece of 
the course is a three-week trip to the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, August 28- 
September 20, 1997. Preparation and debriefing sessions are also part of the course, sched- 
uled for August 2 1-22 and September 23-25. For more information, contact Stephen Bevans 
or Richard Bliese at 773-363-1342. 

Sweden. Under an agreement between LSTC and the University of Uppsala, LSTC 
students may study at the University of Uppsala on a full-time basis for a year; courses are 
offered in English. Students from other ACTS schools who are interested in this program 

19 



should contact Ralph Klein, LSTC; phone: 773-256-072 1 ; or Richard Bliese at the CCGM 
office; phone: 773-363-1342. 

Syria/Jordan. CTU offers the study tour "Christian Origins in the East: Syria/Jor- 
dan" June 16-19, 1999. Students will visit sites in Syria, Jordan, and, if possible, Leba- 
non, that reveal the origins of early Christianity in its Greco-Roman context, already highly 
developed on the eastern edge of the Roman Empire. Sites to be visited: Damascus, Apamea, 
Ebla, Palmyra, Jerash, Mt. Nebo, Madaba, Petra, and Amman. For information, contact 
Carolyn Osiek or Marianne Race, CTU; phone: 773-753-5355. 

Hispanic Ministries Program 

The Hispanic Ministries Program, offered jointly by McCormick Theological Seminary 
and the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, offers a concentration within the course 
of study of the regular M.Div. and M.A.T.S. degrees. The purpose of the program is to 
prepare Hispanics and other bilingual persons to serve effectively in Hispanic communi- 
ties. The program offers courses in all fields of the seminary curriculum and in the practice 
of ministry in local Hispanic settings. 

In addition to the instruction provided by their own faculties, MTS and LSTC invite 
outstanding Hispanic theologians and ministerial practitioners to their campuses to ex- 
pand the resources available and to reinforce the identity of the Hispanic Ministries Program. 

Hyde Park Joint Pan- African Ministries Program 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools' Joint Pan-African Ministries Program is a 
cooperative effort on the part of six schools to prepare men and women for effective min- 
istries in the African American community. The program was established in 1992 in re- 
sponse to the critical need for black church leadership to serve the practical and spiritual 
needs of its people. Through a series of courses, field experiences, and formation activi- 
ties, students can enhance their preparation for ministry with a special focus on ministry 
in the African American community. 

There are eight core courses in the program: Biblical Interpretation from an Afro- 
centric Perspective; The History of the Black Church in North America; Black Theology; 
Ethical Implications of Ministry in the Black Church; Preaching in the Black Church; 
Pastoral Care in the Black Church; Black Spirituality; and Community Leadership. Work- 
shops, lectures, fellowship occasions, and a mentoring program constitute the formation 
element of the program. 

All students who are enrolled in the Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools are 
eligible to participate in the full program. The core courses are open to all ACTS students. 
Hyde Park students may, with the permission of the academic dean of their school, use an 
African American resource course to meet required course distribution. 

For more information, contact Michelle Bentley, Coordinator, M/L; phone: 773-753- 
3198. 

ACTS Urban Clinical Pastoral Education Program 

Six schools (Chicago Theological Seminary, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, Meadville/ 

20 



Lombard Theological School, and the Divinity School of the University of Chicago) and 
one hospital system (Advocate Health Care, related to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in 
America and the United Church of Christ) sponsor the ACTS Urban Clinical Pastoral 
Education Program in the summer and during the academic year. Accredited by the Asso- 
ciation for Clinical Pastoral Education, the program offers a nontraditional CPE experi- 
ence with a focus on urban and public ministry. It brings together the CPE methodology of 
integration of personal and professional attributes with the practice of ministry in urban agen- 
cies, parishes, and community organizations. The goals of the program are to enable students 

• To experience ministry in a cross-cultural setting 

• To learn how to enter into an ongoing community organization, agency, or parish 

• To develop the ability to do social analysis 

• To discern and maintain a balance between ministry to individuals and ministry to structures 

• To develop an awareness of the important linkages and connections necessary in public 
ministry settings. 

• To develop an awareness of different approaches to public ministry and to define an ap- 
proach that is consistent with their own theological tradition 

• To gain a sense of hope regarding involvement in the public sector 

• To develop an ability to reflect on their own learning process and to include others in that 
process. 

The summer program runs for 10 weeks, full time (mid-June through late August), 
and the yearlong program for 30 weeks, 15 hours per week, in coordination with the 
seminary calendars; an intensive 11 -week format is also available during the academic 
year. Applicants should complete the standard ACPE application, have an admission in- 
terview with a CPE supervisor, and meet with the director of the program. Applications 
submitted by December 20 (for the summer) or May 1 (for the fall) will be given first 
priority. There is a $25 application fee. For further information contact Barbara Sheehan, 
S.P., Director, ACTS Urban CPE Program, c/o CTS, 5757 South University Ave., Chi- 
cago, IL 60637; phone: 773-752-5757, ext. 266. 

The Center for Religion and the News Media 

The Center for Religion and the News Media is a collaborative project sponsored by Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern 
University. 

The center was established in 1994 to enhance the news media's coverage of religion 
and the religious dimension of other issues. It trains both journalists specializing in the cover- 
age of religion and religious leaders interested in acquiring media skills. A dual degree 
program enables students to tap into the resources of both the participating schools. 

Inquiries about the center should be directed to Roy Larson, G-ETS; phone: 847-866-3960. 

Chicago Center for Global Ministries 

To meet the growing challenges to preparation for ministry posed by globalization trends 
today, Catholic Theological Union, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, and 
McCormick Theological Seminary established the Chicago Center for Global Ministries 
(CCGM) in 1993. The purpose of the center is both to coordinate more effectively current 
resources and to build upon those resources to meet the globalization challenge for minis- 

21 



try, especially in regard to world mission, cross-cultural ministries, interreligious dia- 
logue, urban ministries, and issues of justice, peace, and ecology. 

CCGM serves as a focus point for these areas of ministry by coordinating course 
offerings, offering a forum where concerned faculty may meet to discuss these issues, and 
providing a locus for new research efforts in these areas of globalization. At a time when 
theological education is becoming more international and multicultural, and the world 
itself manifests simultaneously a new concern for particularity and greater possibilities for 
communication, the work of the Chicago Center for Global Ministries embraces these 
paradoxes and complexities as the location for training ministers for the twenty-first century. 

For additional information, contact Stephen Bevans, Director, or Richard Bliese, As- 
sociate Director, at the CCGM office at CTU; phone: 773-363-1342; fax: 773-324-4360; 
e-mail: ccgminstry@aol.com. 

The Center for Ethics and Values at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

The Center for Ethics offers seminars, lectures, and conferences on a rich array of public 
concerns. Recent topics have included dying well in the late twentieth century, religion 
and war, children in the city, the future of health care, and business ethics. The center, 
based at G-ETS, is connected with the graduate faculty of Northwestern University and 
enjoys the resources of North western's professional schools as well as those of the churches 
and synagogues of Chicago and the Evanston area. 

ACTS faculty and students are invited to attend lectures of interest or to become 
involved as scholar-participants in any of the cycles. For more information, contact Ken- 
neth Vaux, Director; phone: 847-866-3887. 

Doctor of Ministry with a Religious Education Specialization 

The Doctor of Ministry degree with a specialization in religious education is a cooperative 
degree program of four ACTS schools: Chicago Theological Seminary, Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary, McCormick Theological Seminary, and Meadville/ 
Lombard Theological School. 

The core curriculum of six courses supplements the individual requirements of the 
D.Min. degree of each of the participating schools. Together they contribute to the pro- 
gram objectives of (1) creating a community of discourse around educational ministries 
that brings various denominations into a dialogue about their common challenges and 
possibilities; (2) providing religious educators with time for reflection on theological and 
educational methods for the practice of ministry as well as methods for research; and (3) 
making accessible the rich resources of Chicago theological schools for research and in- 
struction related to educational ministries. 

Core courses will be team taught as one-week intensive courses in June and July. 
These courses are open to students registered in this program, other D.Min. students, and 
others by permission of the instructors only. 

The courses for 1998 are Theory, Models, and History of Religious Education and The 
Congregation as Learning Community. Application forms for admission are available from 
the participating schools. For additional information contact Elizabeth Caldwell, phone: 
773-947-6329; or Susan Harlow, phone: 773-753-3195. 

22 



Noncredit Language Courses 

Noncredit courses in French, German, Greek, and Latin are available to graduate students 
in the Chicago area through a program administered by the Hyde Park Cluster of Theo- 
logical Schools. The aim of the courses is to assist students to achieve facility in reading 
these languages and to prepare students for the graduate language exams required by 
certain degree programs. Moderate fees are charged. For further information, contact Celia 
Brickman; phone: 773-643-5806. 



23 



COOPERATING INSTITUTIONS 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 

The Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science (CASIRAS) is an independent 
corporation, consisting of scientists and theologians. Although it is national in scope, it 
concentrates a number of its activities, as well as its administrative office, in Hyde Park 
and has developed an effective working relationship with neighboring theological schools. 
The founder is Ralph Wendell Burhoe (Emeritus, M/L), recipient of the 1980 Templeton 
Award. CASIRAS's activities are held chiefly in cooperation with the Chicago Center for 
Religion and Science (CCRS) at LSTC, of which it is a cofounder. For information about 
CCRS, see the current catalog of LSTC. 

CASIRAS and CCRS seek to achieve a greater integration between the scientific and 
religious models or images concerning the nature, destiny, and moral behavior of humans. 
Dimensions of CASIRAS's work include seminars, courses, conferences, symposia, and 
guided research as well as the publication of Zy go n: Journal of Religion and Science. In 
cooperation with LSTC and M/L, CASIRAS offers the advanced Seminar in Religion and 
Science (T-672) each year, usually in the spring quarter. 

For further information contact Philip Hefner, LSTC; phone: 773-256-0670. 

Centro para Desarrollo Comunitario y Liderato 
Center for Community and Leadership Development 

1305 N. Hamlin Avenue Executive Director: Raphael Morales 

Chicago, IL 60651 
773-489-4533; fax: 773-489-4541 

Centro para Desarrollo Comunitario y Liderato (CDCL) is a community-based organiza- 
tion established in 1 98 1 to serve the predominantly Latino community of the near northwest 
side of Chicago. Centro seeks to (1) develop programs by creating networks of grassroots 
organizations and churches (from all the denominations present in the area) to meet the 
needs of the community's poor and minority population; (2) do organizing around grassroots 
issues to promote neighborhood stability and empowerment; (3) provide training to both 
community lay leaders and pastors on institutional development and strategies for resolv- 
ing community issues; and (4) provide consulting and technical assistance to grassroots 
organizations and churches on effective methodologies for leadership, institutional, and 
community development. 

CDCL seeks to address the root causes of poverty in the Latino community of Chicago 
by raising the awareness level of community residents and assisting them in self- 
development, leadership skills, and becoming self-sufficient. These leaders, in turn, be- 
come community assets in developing strategies to resolve or alleviate social problems. 
CDCL's work is accomplished in relationship with well-established social, educational, 
and religious institutions. It serves as a center for the empowerment of leaders and the self- 
development and training of Latino pastors and residents of Chicago. 

24 



Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 

200 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 502 President: David J. Frenchak 

Chicago, IL 60601-5909 
312-726-1200; fax: 312-726-0425 

The Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education (SCUPE) provides specific programs 
of study in the area of urban pastoral education. SCUPE works cooperatively with Chicago- 
area churches and community agencies and is committed to the development of competent 
and creative leaders who both understand and can work with the realities of power, poverty, 
and pluralism found in cities. 

For students interested in exploring urban ministry as a vocation, SCUPE provides an 
intensive spring-quarter program of urban pastoral education that is designed to fit into the 
core curriculum of a Master of Divinity degree. Through an integrated educational structure 
of curriculum, church/agency internship, and small-group process, SCUPE students live, work, 
and study in the city, developing both professional and personal skills. Representative courses 
include Transforming Urban Communities; Church-based Community Development; 
Christology and Culture; Urban Issues; and Dimensions of Leadership for Urban Ministry. 

Students unable to undertake the full program may enroll in individual courses offered 
throughout the spring quarter. It is possible for students to extend the internship component 
of the program into the summer quarter for additional field education credit. Courses offered 
by SCUPE during the academic year appear with a SCUPE prefix in the course descriptions in 
this catalog. 

Students from ACTS schools that are members of SCUPE (G-ETS and NPTS) receive 
both academic and field education credit for the SCUPE program. Students from other ACTS 
schools are responsible to arrange details of accreditation and tuition payment through their 
seminary dean. 

Every two years SCUPE hosts the Congress on Urban Ministry, which brings together 
persons involved in urban ministry throughout the nation. The next congress will be held in 
April 1998. A one-week intensive course is offered in conjunction with the congress. 

For further information about SCUPE, contact Carol Ann McGibbon, Executive Vice 
President. 

Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies 

618 S. Michigan Avenue President: Howard A. Sulkin 

Chicago, IL 60605 Vice President for Academic Affairs: Byron L. Sherwin 

312-922-9012 

Spertus College, the academic division of Spertus Institute, offers graduate degrees (master's 
and doctoral) in Jewish Studies and provides continuing adult education for the Chicago 
community at large. The college is the largest nonrabbinical training school for higher Jewish 
learning in the Midwest. Certain Spertus degrees may be earned through "distance learning." 
Founded in 1924, the institute is comprised of Spertus College, the Asher Library, and 
Spertus Museum. The Asher Library and Spertus Museum hold the major collections of 
Jewish art, ritual objects, books, journals, music videos, and archives in the Chicago area. 
These resources are available to faculty and students of ACTS schools. 

25 



An agreement between Spertus College and the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 
was signed in 1978 to provide for library access and cross-registration of students. Various 
courses have been taught on ACTS campuses as well. Spertus courses are open for cross- 
registration for students of all ACTS schools, but special considerations may apply. Be- 
cause procedures for cross-registration, acceptance of courses for credit, and modes of 
payment may differ in individual schools, students are responsible to determine what par- 
ticulars apply at their own schools. 

For further information about all Spertus courses and programs, contact the Office of 
Student Services; phone: 312-322-1769. 

Women's Place Resource Center 

30 East Adams Street, Suite 400 Coordinator: Jody Gardner 

Chicago, IL 60603 
312-553-9008; fax: 312-553-1050 

Women's Place Resource Center (WPRC) is a place where women and women's organiza- 
tions come together for learning, support, and networking. Women from diverse religious 
traditions, life experiences, and commitments in the world are welcomed. The women of 
WPRC are deeply committed to addressing both local and global issues that affect women. 
WPRC offers a number of services: 

•A library of women's books, periodicals, resource binders, and bulletin boards con- 
taining information about organizations serving women, their newsletters, work- 
shops, and other events. 
•Educational, cultural, spiritual, political, and celebratory programs provided by its 

partner organizations and others. 
•A healing arts center where various types of massage, counseling, energy healing, 

and light/sound technology are available. 
•Reasonably priced meeting space and office space for individual women, women's 
nonprofit organizations, and small women's businesses. 
WPRC cosponsors seminars and programs related to its concerns throughout the year. 
Programs that focus on women's spirituality, battered women, women's health, women in 
leadership, or other issues can be arranged for seminaries, schools, and churches. 



26 



THE ACTS LIBRARY COUNCIL 

The ACTS Library Council members' combined library collections comprise over 1 .6 mil- 
lion volumes of books, about 5,000 currently received periodicals, electronic media equip- 
ment, and modern language laboratory facilities. 

Circulation Policies. Students and faculty of the Library Council member schools 
have borrowing privileges at all of the libraries but must abide by the circulation policies 
of each library. These users may also request at their local library material from other 
member libraries which will be sent through the courier service of the Council. The courier's 
schedule is three times a week during fall, winter, and spring quarters and twice a week 
during quarter breaks and most of the summer. Most libraries levy fines for overdue, dam- 
aged, and lost library materials. 

In addition to the resources of their own libraries, all libraries in the Council have 
access to the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), a national and international bib- 
liographic database through which access to the collections of thousands of libraries and 
millions of volumes is made available. In addition, the United Library (G-ETS and S-WTS) 
is part of the Northwestern University Library computerized system, and the Catholic 
Theological Union Library is part of 10 (Illinet Online), which gives access to over 800 
libraries in the state of Illinois. 

Mission Statement. The ACTS Library Council recognizes both its responsibility to 
share the richness of its combined theological resources and the benefits of networking in 
the face of financial limitations. Therefore, the Library Council commits itself to collabo- 
rative collection development and to cooperative organization of and access to resources 
for theological education. To achieve this mission: 

• The Library Council supports its member libraries in collecting resources to support con- 
stituent degree programs and scholarly research and to represent the religious traditions of 
the member schools. 

• The Library Council by systematic planning identifies and coordinates the acquisition of 
resources in selecting religious traditions not represented by the member schools. 

• The Library Council seeks ways to provide access to those materials not collected by the 
member libraries. 

• The Library Council provides bibliographic access and delivery of materials among mem- 
ber libraries. 

Goals. In order to carry out its mission, the ACTS Library Council has the 
following goals: 

• To provide ready access for the academic communities of the member institutions to 
information about the resources for the theological education and research available in 
the ACTS libraries 

• To provide access to these resources themselves through reciprocal borrowing agreements, 
interlibrary borrowing, and a courier service 

• To insure the acquisition and maintenance of in-depth collections in the religious traditions 
represented by the member institutions 

• To prevent unintentional duplication of materials among member libraries 

• To support programs for the conservation and preservation of ACTS library collections 

• To provide a greater range of resources through cooperative acquisition agreements 

27 



• To identify and maintain automated systems to support these programs for collection devel- 
opment and access 

• To enable consultation among ACTS librarians and communication between the Library 
Council and the Common Council of ACTS. 

Library Hours. Hours are given for regular academic sessions. The location is given 
only for joint libraries. 



Catholic Theological Union 

The Library 

773-753-5321; fax 773-753-5340 

Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00p.m. -10:00p.m. 

Chicago Theological Seminary 

Hammond Library 

773-752-5757, ext. 225; fax 773-752-5925 
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. 
Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

Sunday 7:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

The United Library 

Both campuses 

847-866-3909, -3899; fax 847-866-3957 

Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Saturday 12:00 m. -5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 6:00p.m. -10:00p.m. 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Society of Jesus: Chicago Province 

Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick (JKM) Library 
LSTC campus 

773-256-0739; fax 773-256-0737 
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 
Friday-Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 6:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. 



Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

The Wiggin Memorial Library 
773-753-3196; fax 773-753-1323 
Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 



Mundelein Seminary 

The Feehan Memorial Library 
847-566-6401, ext. 4820; fax 847-566-5229 
Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

North Park Theological Seminary 

North Park Consolidated Library 
773-244-6239, -5580; fax 773-244-4891 
Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m. -12:00p.m. 
Friday 7:45 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m. -12:00 p.m. 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Brimson Grow Library 
630-620-2104; fax 630-620-2170 
Monday-Thursday 9:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 
Friday-Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 
Sunday 5:00 p.m. -10:00p.m. 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

Rolling Memorial Library 
847-3 1 7-4000; fax 847-3 1 7-40 1 2 
Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m. -11:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Sunday 3:00 p.m. - 8:00p.m. 



Wheaton College Libraries 

Billy Graham Center Library 
630-752-5084, -5194; fax 630-752-5916 



Monday-Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 



Buswell Memorial Library 

630-752-5 1 1 , -5 1 02; fax 630-752-5855 



Monday-Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



7:30 a.m. -11:45 p.m. 
7:30 a.m. - 9:45 p.m. 
8:15 a.m. - 9:45 p.m. 



28 



1997 SUMMER PROGRAMS 

A number of courses are available in summer programs offered by ACTS institutions. The 
cross-registration agreements explained on page 43 apply only to the regular academic year. 
Students are encouraged to do summer study at schools other than their institutions of ma- 
triculation, but each student must register personally with the offering school or joint program 
for summer courses and make payment directly to that institution. 

As an aid to students in locating summer study opportunities in the Chicago area, these 
programs are outlined below; for each course only the number, title, and professor are listed, 
along with the available information on meeting times. (Please refer to pp. 40-43 for an 
explanation of course numbers.) 

Catholic Theological Union — Summer Institute 1997 

Catholic Theological Union's Summer Institute consists of short intensive courses for those 
interested in earning credit for degrees or continuing education. Students may earn 1.5 
graduate quarter credits, one graduate semester credit, or one Continuing Education Unit 
(CEU) per course. For further information, contact Eleanor Holland, I.B.V.M., Director of 
Continuing Education; phone: 773-753-7474; fax: 773-324-4360. 

Session 1: June 9-13 

S 460S Consecrated Life after the Synod (Gottemoeller/Yuhaus) 8:45-1 1:15 
MP 427S Grief and Grieving: A Pastoral Perspective (Anderson) 8:45-1 1:15 
W 45 1 S Preaching Wakes and Funerals (Fragomeni) 1 : 1 5-3 :45 

(not available for credit for M.Div. or M.A.P.S. students) 
B 450S Introduction to the Letters of Paul (Murphy-O 'Connor) 1:15-3 :45 
S 532S Spirituality of Thomas Merton (Collins) 4-6:30 p.m. 
S 400S Global Spirituality/Mysticism (Teasdale) 7-9:30 p.m. 
MW 401 S Evangelization: Toward a New Millennium (Brennan) 7-9:30 p.m. 

Session 2: June 16-20 

W 463S Wading through the Rite: Exploring RCIA (Gensler/Lucinio) 8:45-1 1:15 

S 404S Soundings in Christian Mysticism (Ryan) 1:15-3:45 

W 452S Preaching Retreats and Missions (Fragomeni) 1:15-3:45 

(not available for credit for M.Div. or M.A.P.S. students) 

S 440S Dreamwork in the Context of Spiritual Direction (Luther) 4-6:30 p.m. 

DS403A The Spirituality of Power I (Cahill) 7-9:30 p.m. 

B441S Luke-Acts: Preaching and Teaching Themes (Senior) 7-9:30 p.m. 

Session 3: June 23-27 

E 561 S Spirituality and the Quest for Justice (Pawlikowski) 8:45-1 1:15 
B 408S Ruth and Jonah: Jewish Missionary Tracts? (Perelmuter) 8:45-1 1:15 
S444S The Universe: The Body of God (Beskar) 1:15-3:45 (for CE Us only) 
B411S The Social and Religious Protest of Amos (Okoye) 1:15-3:45 
SMP420S Spiritual Assessment for Pastoral Ministry (Fitchett) 4-6:30 p.m. 
DS 403B The Spirituality of Power II (Cahill) 7-9:30 p.m. (Prereq: DS 403A) 

29 



ACTS Urban Clinical Pastoral Education Program 

Five ACTS schools, the University of Chicago Divinity School, and Advocate Health Care 
(related to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the United Church of Christ) 
sponsor the ACTS Urban Clinical Pastoral Education Program, a 10-week summer pro- 
gram offering a nontraditional CPE experience with a focus on urban and public ministry. 
Applications are to be submitted by the preceding December 20. For more information, 
contact Barbara Sheehan, S.P., Director, ACTS Urban CPE Program, c/o CTS; phone: 
773-752-5757, ext. 266. Refer also to the description of this cooperative program on page 20. 

1997 Chicago Seminary Summer Session 

The 1997 Chicago Seminary Summer Session is a joint project of five seminaries: Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School, and Wartburg Theological Seminary, Dubuque, Iowa. 

All but two courses are offered in a one-week intensive format and are worth one full 
course credit or three Continuing Education Units (CEUs). Two courses are two weeks 
long. The courses are suitable for a broad range of purposes: CEUs, Master of Arts, Master 
of Divinity, Doctor of Ministry, and other graduate programs. Laypeople, rostered church 
professionals, pastors, and seminarians will find courses that enrich their lives and ministries. 

A number of courses have specific prerequisites, and certain categories of students will be 
given preference for some courses (for example, D.Min. in Preaching students for the eiectives in 
preaching). Most courses have a limit of 20 students, while the preaching courses have a limit of 15. 
Once a course has been filled, additional students must obtain permission from the instructor and the 
LSTC Extension Education Office. Courses are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Ordinarily, 
students may take only two courses. Most courses meet 8:30-4:30, including chapel and lunch. 

Students register through one of the participating seminaries. All registrations are to be sent to 
the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. Further information about registration, tuition, and 
courses can be obtained from the Office of Extension Education at LSTC; phone: 773-256-0723. 

A Summer Session special event will be the preaching lectures by Prathia Hall Wynn, 
dean of African American Ministries and lecturer in Christian ethics, United Theological 
Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. The lectures, sponsored by the ACTS D.Min. in Preaching Pro- 
gram, will be held from 11:30 to 12:30 on June 30, July 1, and July 2, in the chapel- 
auditorium of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. There will be a fee of $5.00 per 
lecture at the door for those not enrolled in the D.Min. in Preaching Program. 

Week One Courses: June 23-27 (courses meet 8:30-4:30) 

SSB-475 Preaching Luke: Turning the World Upside Down (Krentz, LSTC) 

SSH-466 Luther and the Religions: A Study of Major Theological Themes in Luther's Thought 

in the Search for a Theology of Religions (Persaud, WTS) 
SSM-522 Personality Theories I (Benson, LSTC) 

SSM-424 A Holistic Approach to Youth and Family Ministry (Hill, LSTC) 
SSM-425 A Practical Theology of Ministry from a Gay /Lesbian Perspective (Morrison, CTS) 
SSM-307 Polity and Worship in the Presbyterian Church (Smith, MTS) 

Two- Week Courses: June 23-JuIy 4 

SST-468 Theologies from Asia (Chun, MTS) M-F 8:30-11:30 

SSH-467 Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement (Edwards, MTS) M-F 1:30-^:30 

30 



Week Two Courses: June 30-July 4 (courses meet 8:30-4:30) 

SBB-476 The Historical Jesus (Roth, LSTC) 

SST-469 Christology and the Human Cultural Situation (Pero, LSTC) 

SST-470 Perspectives on American Civil Religion (Speller, CTS) 

SSM-526 Methodology in Pastoral Theology (Conrad, LSTC) 

SSM-527 Pastoral Theology after Christendom (Anderson, LSTC) 

SSW-471 Religions of the World in Chicago (Read, M/L) 

Also in Week Two: ACTS D.Min. in Preaching courses 

SSM-480 Preaching Morality and the Morality of Preaching (Boyd) 
SSM-481 Table, Font, and Pulpit (Campbell) 
SSM-482 Preaching with Conflicted Congregations (Halverstadt) 
SSM-483 Celebrating God's Shalom: Preaching as Sacred Play (Schlafer) 
SSM-484 Preaching from the Gospel According to John (Tanzer) 

Week Three Course: July 7-1 1 (course meets 8:30^:30) 
SST-475 Theologies of the Liberal Churches (Willems, M/L) 

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary — Summer School 1997 

The Summer School of G-ETS offers a variety of courses for academic credit or continuing 
education credit. Within the structure of two terms, courses are offered as one- week or two- 
week intensives. For further information, call Denise Johnson or Doris Rudy; phone: 847- 
866-3942 or 847-866-3936. 

Field Education (June 16-August 1) 

02-644 or 22-644 Women, Ministry, and the City (Troxell et al.) 

First Term (June 16-27) 

1 1-602 Old Testament: The Second Book of Samuel (Duncan) June 16-27 

12-501 New Testament Interpretation: Matthew-Acts (Vena) June 16-27 

13-615 The Sacraments and Spiritual Formation (Felton) June 16-27 

(Prereq: 13-501, 502, or 503) 

22-501 Church and Society: Basic Analysis (Tholin/Scott) June 16-27 

33-506 Theological Education in the Parish (Crain) June 16-27 

34/33-507 Leadership in the Local Church (Wingeier) June 16-27 

34-634 Evangelism for Congregational Outreach and Growth (Alphonse) June 16-27 

40-674 United Methodist Studies: Wesley/1 9th Century (Stein/Gesling) June 16-27 

elective The Ministry of Spiritual Discernment (Morris) June 16-20 

elective Journeying toward Wholeness in the Global Village: Women Sharing Faith (L. Vogel) 

June 16-20 

elective Theology of the Holy Spirit (D. Vogel) June 16-20 

elective Ministry with Generation X (Phillips) June 23-27 

elective Oral History Seminar (Murphy) June 23-27 

Second Term (July 1-12) 

21-500 Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary Theology (Young) June 30-July 1 1 
31-501 Developing and Preaching the Sermon (Chatfield) June 30-July 1 1 
31-513 Creating Worship in Community (Elkins) June 30-July 1 1 
32-639 Pastoral Care to the Congregation (Marshall) June 30-July 1 1 

31 



33-501 Teaching and Learning in the Church (Matthaei) June 30-July 1 1 

33-635 History and Theories of Christian Education (Kang) June 30-July 1 1 

40-673 United Methodist Studies— History, Doctrine, and Polity: 20th Century (Troxell/ 

Gesling) June 30-July 1 1 
elective Theology of Congregational Song (Wren) June 30-July 4 

and Applied Music Workshop (Hunt/ Brugh/ Harris) July 7-1 1 
elective Religion as News: A Writing Seminar (Cattau/Larson) June 30-July 9 
elective Intensive Journal Workshop (D'Alessio) June 30-July 4 
elective The Church with a Human Face: Ecclesiology and Congregational Studies (Wingeier) 

June 30-July 4 
elective The Ministry of Supervision (Gramley) July 7-1 1 
elective Good Givers (Lackore) July 7-1 1 

LSTC Summer Greek Program 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago will offer intensive study of New Testament Greek 

in two three-week sequential courses: 

SB-307 Biblical Greek I (Holloway) July 14-August 1 M-F 8:30-11:30 
SB-308 Biblical Greek II (Holloway) August 4-22 M-F 8:30-11:30 

For further information, contact Patricia Bartley, Registrar; phone: 773-256-0717. 

NPTS Summer Greek Program 

North Park Theological Seminary will offer intensive study of New Testament Greek in 
one five-week course: 

BIBL5108 New Testament Greek: Summer Intensive (Staff) July 14-August 15 M-F 8-12 
For further information, contact Vern Blackwood, Registrar; phone: 773-244-5560. 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School — Summer School 1997 

TEDS offers a wide variety of courses for academic credit, varying in quarter hours for 
each course. A selection from the over 50 courses offered is given below. For further 
information and a brochure, contact the Admissions Office, 847-3 1 7-801 5, or Barry Beitzel, 
Associate Academic Dean; phone: 847-317-8084. 

Session I (June 23-July 12) 

OT503 Elementary Hebrew (L) (Magary) MTWTh 8-12 noon 

PC 675 Counseling Dysfunctional Families (Wilson) June 23-27 M 1-5; TWTh 8:30-12 

noon, 1-4:30; F 8-12 noon 
ST 401 Introduction to German (Kline) MTWTh 9-12 noon 
ST 408 Theological French I (Colman) MTWTh 1-4 
Note: Classes will not meet on July 4 in observance of Independence Day. 

Session II (July 14-August 2) 

NT 401-2a Beginning Greek I-IIa (Staff) MTWThFSa 8-11:45 

OT504 Elementary Hebrew II (L) (Magary) July 21-Aug. 2 MTWThF 8-12 noon 

OT 550 English Bible: Psalms (VanGemeren) July 18-19, Aug. 1-2, 15-16 

F 7-9:30 p.m., Sa 8:30-12 noon, 1^:30 
PC 737 Ethics and Issues in Counseling (Stark) July 28-Aug. 1 

M 1-5; TWTh 8:30-12 noon; F 8-12 noon 

32 



ST 406 Theological German I (Yarbrough) MTWTh 9-1 1 :30 
ST 409 Theological French II (Colman) MTWTh 1-3:45 

Session III (August 4-23) 

ME 845 Lifestyle of the Great Commission (Coleman) MTWTh 8-11:45 
NT402b-3 Beginning Greek Ilb-III (Staff) MTWThFSa 8-11:45 
ST 407 Theological German II (Yarbrough) MTWTh 9-1 1 :30 

Women, Ministry, and the City 

A Summer Study /Action Program for Women in Ministry 

June 16-August 7, 1997 (1998 dates: June 15-July 31) 

The Women, Ministry and the City Summer Study/Action Program is for women who 
want to integrate their faith and theology with the practice of ministry. This ministry 
practicum will include serving in an urban parish or community organization with a woman 
mentor and experiencing actual ministry for the empowerment of women in diverse Chi- 
cago contexts. Students will participate in didactic sessions for theological and social analysis 
of women's issues, including racism, homophobia and heterosexism, violence against 
women, economics and poverty, womanist/feminist theologies, and their global dimen- 
sions. Women scholars, from various Chicago theological seminaries, and community ac- 
tivists lead the weekly didactic sessions for theological and social analysis. Students present 
and respond to weekly case studies. After the first week of orientation, women spend 20 
hours a week at their ministry site and two days a week in group sessions with other 
participants in the program. 

The program is offered by Women, Ministry and the City in cooperation with the 
Institute of Pastoral Studies, Loyola University Chicago. Sponsors include Associated Men- 
nonite Biblical Seminary; Catholic Theological Union; Chicago Theological Seminary; 
Earlham School of Religion; the Ann Ida Gannon, B.V.M., Center for Women and Lead- 
ership; Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago; McCormick Theological Seminary; and Northern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary. 

Participants must register through their Chicago-area school or the Institute of Pasto- 
ral Studies, Loyola University Chicago, and pay its tuition and fees. Academic credit is 
granted through the registering institution. Application deadlines: April 18 for 1997 and 
May 1 for 1998 (late applications will be considered if space is available). For more infor- 
mation or an application, contact Barbara Isaacs, 1629 Verdin Lane, Naperville, IL 60565; 
phone: 630-369-6312. 



33 



ACADEMIC CALENDARS 

Nine of the 1 1 ACTS schools offer three quarters of instruction each academic year, al- 
though they do not use a common calendar. Catholic Theological Union, Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological 
Seminary, Meadville/Lombard Theological School, and Northern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary use calendars that closely parallel the calendar of the University of Chicago. Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and Seabury- Western Theological Seminary follow a 
coordinated calendar that closely parallels that of Northwestern University. 

It should be noted that in 1997-98, both North Park Theological Seminary and 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School inaugurate a semester calendar. Each semester is 
divided into two quads (A and B); some courses are offered for the full semester, and 
others meet for a single quad only. Fall semester courses, as well as those offered in fall 
quad A or B, are listed in the Fall section of courses. Because the opening of spring semes- 
ter and spring quad A courses coincides with the beginning of the winter quarter at the 
other ACTS schools, these courses are listed in the Winter section. Spring quad B courses 
appear in the Spring section. 

The following calendars for each school give registration dates, beginning and ending 
dates of each term, and any dates on which classes will not be held. 



Catholic Theological Union 






1997-98 


Fall 


1998-99 


September 3 


D. Min. Core Colloquium I begins 


September 2 


September 22-25 


Final registration for fall quarter 


September 21-24 


September 29 


Classes begin 


September 28 


October 4 


Last day to add courses 


October 5 


November 17-19 


Registration for winter quarter 


November 16-18 


November 27-30 


Thanksgiving recess 


November 26-29 


December 12 


Fall quarter ends 
Winter 


December 1 1 


January 5 


Classes begin 


January 4 


January 9 


Last day to add courses 


January 1 1 


February 23-25 


Registration for spring quarter 


February 22-24 


March 20 


Winter quarter ends 
Spring 


March 19 


March 30 


Classes begin 


March 29 


April 3 


Last day to add courses 


April 9 


April 10-13 


Easter recess 


April 2-5 


May 18-20 


Preregistration for fall quarter 


May 17-18 


June 5 


Spring quarter ends 


June 4 



Chicago Theological Seminary 
1997-98 



Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 



1997-98 



Fall 



1998-99 





Fall 




September 22 


Registration tor fall quarter 


September 28 


September 29 


Classes begin 


October 5 


October 10 


Last day to add/drop courses 


October 16 


November 17-21 


Registration for winter quarter 


November 16-20 


November 27-28 


Thanksgiving recess 


November 26-27 


December 12 


Fall quarter ends 
Winter 


December 18 


January 5 


Classes begin 


January 4 


January 16 


Last day to add/drop courses 


January 15 


January 19 


Martin Luther King Jr. Day 


January 18 


February 23-27 


Registration for spring quarter 


February 22-26 


March 20 


Winter quarter ends 
Spring 


March 19 


March 30 


Classes begin 


March 29 


April 10 


Good Friday recess 


April 2 


April 13 


Last day to add/drop courses 


April 9 


May 18-22 


Preregistration for fall quarter 


May 17 


May 25 


Memorial Day 


May 31 


June 5 


Spring quarter ends 


June 4 



1998-99 



September 24-25 


Registration for fall quarter 


September 23-24 


September 29 


Classes begin 


September 28 


October 3 


Last day to add a class 


October 2 


November 17-19 


Registration for winter quarter 


November 16-18 


November 24-28 


Thanksgiving recess 


November 23-27 


December 12 


Fall quarter ends 
Winter 


December 1 1 


January 5 


Classes begin 


January 4 


January 6 


Last day to add a class for 2-week classes 


January 5 


January 28 


Last day to add a class for 8-week classes 


January 27 


March 3^1 


Registration for spring quarter 


March 1-3 


March 20 


Winter quarter ends 
Spring 


March 19 


March 30 


Classes begin 


March 29 


April 3 


Last day to add a class 


April 5 


April 9-10 


Good Friday recess 


April 1-2 


June 4 


Spring quarter ends 


June 3 



35 



Lutheran School of Theology 
1997-98 



Fall 



1998-99 



September 2 


Fall preterm begins 


September 1 


September 24-25 


Registration for fall quarter 


September 23-24 


September 29 


Classes begin 


September 28 


October 3 


Last day to add courses 


October 2 


November 12-13 


Registration for winter quarter 


November 18-19 


November 24-28 


Reading week 


November 23-27 


December 12 


Fall quarter ends 
Winter 


December 1 1 


January 5 


Classes begin 


January 4 


January 9 


Last day to add courses 


January 8 


January 19 


Martin Luther King Jr. Day 


January 18 


February 9-13 


Reading week 


February 8-12 


February 25-26 


Registration for spring quarter 


February 24-25 


March 20 


Winter quarter ends 
Spring 


March 19 


March 30 


Classes begin 


March 29 


April 3 


Last day to add courses 


April 1 


April 10 


Good Friday recess 


April 2 


May 25 


Memorial Day 


May 31 


June 4 


Spring quarter ends 


June 3 



McCormick Theological Seminary 



1997-98 



September 2-20 


September 23-25 


September 29 


November 18-19 


November 24-28 


November 27-30 


December 12 


January 5 


January 19 


February 9-13 


February 17-18 


March 20 


March 30 


April 10 


May 4-15 


May 25 


June 5 



Fall 

Fall preterm 

Registration for fall quarter 

Classes begin 

Registration for winter quarter 

Reading week 

Thanksgiving recess 

Fall quarter ends 

Winter 

Classes begin 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day 

Reading week 

Registration for spring quarter 

Winter quarter ends 

Spring 

Classes begin 
Good Friday recess 
Registration for fall quarter 
Memorial Day 
Spring quarter ends 



1998-99 

August 31 -September 19 
September 22-24 
September 28 
November 17-18 
November 23-27 
November 26-29 
December 1 1 

January 4 

January 18 

February 8-12 

February 16-17 

March 19 



March 29 

April 2 

May 3-14 

May 31 

June 4 



36 



Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
1997-98 



1998-99 





Fall 




September 24-26 


Registration for fall quarter 


September 30, October 1-2 


September 29 


Classes begin 


October 5 


October 3 1 


Last day to add/drop courses 


November 6 


November 27-28 


Thanksgiving recess 


November 26-27 


December 3-5 


Registration for winter quarter 


December 9-1 1 


December 13 


Fall quarter ends 
Winter 


December 19 


January 5 


Classes begin 


January 4 


January 15 


Martin Luther King Jr. Day 


January 18 


February 6 


Last day to add/drop courses 


February 5 


March 11-13 


Registration for spring quarter 


March 10-12 


March 21 


Winter quarter ends 
Spring 


March 20 


March 30 


Classes begin 


March 29 


May 1 


Last day to add/drop courses 


April 30 


May 26 


Memorial Day 


May 24 


June 13 


Spring quarter ends 


June 12 



Mundelein Seminary 
1997-98 

April 21 -May 2 
September 8 
September 12 
October 6-17 
November 14 



December 1 
December 5 

December 20-January 4 
January 12-23 
February 20 

March 9 
March 13 
April 8-14 
April 20-May 1 
May 22 



Fall 

Registration for fall quarter 
Classes begin 

Last day to add/drop a class 
Registration for winter quarter 
Fall quarter ends 

Winter 

Classes begin 

Last day to add/drop a class 
Christmas recess 
Registration for spring quarter 
Winter quarter ends 

Spring 

Classes begin 

Last day to add/drop a class 
Good Friday recess 
Preregistration for fall quarter 
Spring quarter ends 



1998-99 

April 20-May 1 

September 8 

September 14 

October 5-16 

November 13 

November 30 

December 4 

December 1 8-January 4 

January 1 1-22 

February 19 

March 8 

March 12 

March 31 -April 7 

April 19-30 

May 21 



37 



North Park Theological Seminary 



1997-98* 

August 21-22 
August 25 
September 1 
October 13 
October 14-17 
October 20 
November 20-2 1 
November 27-28 
December 4 

January 12 

January 19 

February 9-13 

March 9 

March 10-15 

March 16 

April 30 

♦Change to semester calendar 



Fall 

Registration for fall semester 

Fall semester begins 

Labor Day 

Quad A ends 

Fall break 

Quad B begins 

Registration for spring semester 

Thanksgiving recess 

Fall semester ends 

Spring 

Spring semester begins 
Martin Luther King Jr. Day 
Covenant Midwinter Conference 
Quad A ends 
Spring break 
Quad B begins 
Spring semester ends 



1998-99 

August 20-21 

August 24 

September 7 

October 12 

October 13-16 

October 19 

November 19-20 

November 26-27 

December 3 

January 1 1 

January 18 

February 1-5 

March 8 

March 9-14 

March 15 

April 29 



Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



1997-98 

August 4-September 1 9 
September 22-24 
September 29 
October 6 
November 10-12 
November 27-28 
December 13 

January 5-9 
January 12 
January 19 
January 20 
February 9-1 1 
March 2 1 

March 30 
April 6 
April 10 
May 11-13 
May 25 
June 12 



1998-99 



Fall 

Fall preterm 

Registration for fall quarter 

Classes begin 

Last day to add/drop courses 

Registration for winter quarter 

Thanksgiving recess 

Fall quarter ends 

Winter 

January term intensives 
Regular classes begin 
Martin Luther King Jr. Day 
Last day to add/drop courses 
Registration for spring quarter 
Winter quarter ends 

Spring 

Classes begin 

Last day to add/drop courses 

Good Friday recess 

Registration for summer term 

Memorial Day 

Spring quarter ends 



August 3-September 1 8 


September 21-23 


September 28 


October 5 


November 9-1 1 


November 26-27 


December 12 


January 4-8 


January 1 1 


January 18 


January 19 


February 9-10 


March 20 


March 29 


April 5 


April 12 


May 10-12 


May 31 


June 1 1 



38 



Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 
1997-98 



1998-99 



Fall 



September 25-26 


Registration for fall quarter 


September 24-25 


September 29 


Classes begin 


September 28 


October 6 


Last day to add a course 


October 5 


November 18-19 


Registration for winter quarter 


November 17-18 


November 24-28 


Thanksgiving recess 


November 23-27 


December 12 


Fall quarter ends 
Winter 


December 1 1 


January 5 


Classes begin 


January 4 


February 9 


Last day to add a course 


February 8 


February 23-27 


Reading week 


February 22-26 


February 24-25 


Registration for spring quarter 


February 23-24 


March 20 


Winter quarter ends 
Spring 


March 19 


March 30 


Classes begin 


March 29 


April 7 


Last day to add a course 


April 6 


April 10-13 


Easter recess 


April 2-5 


May 18-22 


Reading week 


May 17-21 


June 3 


Spring quarter ends 


June 2 



Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
1997-98* 



1998-99 





Fall 




August 28, September 1-2 


Registration for fall semester August 


28, 31, September 1 


September 1 


Classes begin 


August 3 1 


October 28 


Day of prayer 




November 26-30 


Thanksgiving recess 


November 25-29 


December 19 


Fall semester ends 
Spring 


December 18 


January 12-13 


Registration for spring semester 


January 11-12 


January 12 


Classes begin 


January 1 1 


February 28-March 10 


Spring recess February 27-March 1 9 


March 18 


Day of prayer 




April 9-12 


Easter recess 


April 1-4 


May 8 


Spring semester ends 


May 5 


* Change to semester calendar 







39 



INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE LISTINGS 

Organization and Abbreviations Used 

In the following section the courses of the ACTS schools and of SCUPE are listed for each 
quarter according to an outline of these major areas of study: Biblical Studies, Historical 
Studies, Theological Studies, Ethical Studies, Religion and Society Studies, World Mis- 
sion Studies, History of Religions, and Ministry Studies. Each area is subdivided further 
(see the complete outline on p. 118). In each unit of the outline, courses are listed in 
alphabetical order of the initials of the institutions as follows: 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

M/L Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

MS Mundelein Seminary 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

NETS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

NCTI Northside Chicago Theological Institute 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

SCUPE Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 

S-WTS Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
All courses listed in this catalog are open for cross-registration. The catalog includes 
only a selection, however, of the course offerings of Mundelein Seminary and Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. For complete listings of those courses, contact the registrars 
of the two schools. 

An H suffix in a course number indicates that the course is taught in Spanish, and the 
course description is given in Spanish. Courses taught in Korean are indicated by a K 
suffix in the course number. 

P following a course description indicates that students need to obtain permission of 
the instructor to enroll in the class; L denotes a course with limited enrollment. D denotes 
a course using distance learning technology. 

The abbreviations M, T, W, Th, F, Sa, Su are used for days of the week. TBA indicates 
that the professor or time for a course remains to be arranged. (See the note regarding the 
updating of course listings in the section on cross-registration below.) 

All courses are equivalent to three quarter hours of credit, unless otherwise indicated. 

Explanation of Course Numbers 
CTS 

Fields of study Levels of courses 

CH Christian Heritage 300-399 Introductory. 

TEC Theology, Ethics, 400-499 Intermediate 

and Contemporary Culture 500-599 Advanced 

CM Christian Ministries 600-699 Doctoral 

40 



CTU 



Fields of s 


tudy 


B 


Biblical Studies 


C 


Cross-Cultural Studies 


D 


Doctoral Studies 


E 


Ethical Studies 


H 


Historical Studies 


I 


Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 


M 


Ministerial Studies 


MP 


Ministry Related to Pastoral Theology 


MW 


Ministry Related to Word and Worship 


S 


Spirituality Studies 


W 


Word and Worship Studies 


GETS 




Fields of study 


11 


Old Testament 


12 


New Testament 


13 


Church History 


21 


Theology 


22 


Ethics and Society 


31 


Preaching, Worship, and Church Music 


32 


Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 


33 


Christian Education 


34 


Church Administration, Evangelism, and 


35 


Religion and Media 


40 


Interdisciplinary 


LSTC 




Fields of study 


B 


Biblical Studies 


H 


Historical Studies 


T 


Theological Studies 


E 


Ethical Studies 


W 


World Mission Studies 


M 


Ministry Studies 


I 


Interdiscipl inary /Integrative Studies 


M/L 




Fields of s 


tudy 


B 


Biblical Studies 


H 


Historical Studies 


T 


Theological Studies 


E 


Ethical Studies 


W 


World Mission Studies 


HR 


History of Religions 


M 


Ministry Studies 



Levels of courses 

300-399 Introductory or foundational 
400-499 Intermediate 
500-599 Advanced 
600-699 Doctoral 



Levels of courses 

501-599 Foundational 
601-699 Advanced 



Spiritual Formation 



Levels of courses 

300-399 Introductory 
400-499 Intermediate 
500-599 Advanced 
600-699 Doctoral 



Levels of courses 

300-399 Introductory 
400-499 Intermediate 
500-599 Doctoral 



Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 



MS 



Fields of study 

BI Sacred Scripture 

SY Systematic Theology 

MO Christian Life 

HI Church History 

WO Worship 

PL Pastoral Life 



Levels of courses 

200-299 Required 

300-399 Intermediate/Elective 

400-499 Advanced, requiring research 



41 



MTS 




Fields of study 


B 


Biblical Studies 


H 


Historical Studies 


T 


Theological Studies 


E 


Ethical Studies 


W 


World Mission Studies 


M 


Ministry Studies 


I 


Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 


NETS 




Fields of study 


BL 


Biblical Languages 


BS 


Biblical Studies 


CH 


Church History 


CN 


Counseling 


CT 


Context 


DR 


Doctoral 


ED 


Christian Education 


IN 


Integrative/Interdisciplinary 


ME 


Missions and Evangelism 


MN 


Pastoral/Parish Ministry 


NT 


New Testament Studies 


OT 


Old Testament Studies 


PC 


Pastoral Care 


RS 


Religion and Society 


SM 


Supervised Ministry 


TE 


Ethics 


TH 


Theological Studies 


UR 


Urban Ministry 


NPTS 




Fields of study 


BIBL 


Bible 


CEDF 


Christian Education and Formation 


HIST 


History 


MNST 


Ministry 


SPFM 


Spiritual Formation 


THEO 


Theology 


S-WTS 




Fields of study 


01 


Old Testament 


02 


New Testament 


03 


Church History 


04 


Religion and the Arts 


05 


Theology 


06 


Spirituality 


08 


Ethics and Moral Theology 


09 


Liturgies 


10 


Religion in the United States 


11 


Church Music 


12, 13 


Christian Ministries 


14 


Christian Education 


15 


Practica 


16 


Theological Bibliography 


17 


Preaching 



Levels of courses 

300-399 Introductory 
400-499 Intermediate 
500-599 Advanced 
600-699 Doctoral 



Levels of courses 

300-399 Introductory 
400-499 Intermediate 
500-599 Advanced 
600-699 D.Min. 



Levels of courses 

5 1 00-5 1 99 First-year core or introductory 
6200-6299 Second-year core or elective 
7300-7399 Third-year core or elective 



Levels of courses 

500-599 Introductory 



600-699 



700-799 



Intermediate; prerequisites 
or permission required 
Advanced; permission 
required for nondoctoral students 



42 



TEDS 








Fields of s 


tudy 


Levels of courses 


OT 


Old Testament and Semitic Studies 


500-599 


Introductory 


NT 


New Testament Studies 


600-699 


Intermediate 


CH 


Church History 


700-799 


Advanced 




and the History of Christian Thought 


800-849 


Mainly Th.M. and doctoral 


ME 


Missions and Evangelism 


850-994 


Doctoral only 


ST 


Biblical and Systematic Theology 






PR 


Philosophy of Religion 






CC 


Christianity and Contemporary Culture 






CE 


Christian Education 






PC 


Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 






H 


Homiletics 






PT 


Pastoral Theology 







How Cross-Registration Works 

Students of any of the ACTS schools may take courses from any of the other member 
schools directly and with no added charges. Cross-registration into courses of the ACTS 
Urban Clinical Pastoral Education Program, SCUPE, or Spertus Institute of Jewish Stud- 
ies (see pp. 20, 25) may involve different procedures and payment from each ACTS school; 
students are responsible to determine what particulars apply at their own schools. 

Exceptions to the process of cross-registration exist (1) during the summer quarter 
when tuition is normally paid to the school offering the course; (2) for D.Min. courses 
other than Pastoral Care and Counseling and for those students in the ACTS D.Min. in 
Preaching Program; and (3) in certain courses with limited enrollment. Each school in 
ACTS reserves the right to limit enrollment in certain courses for pedagogical reasons and 
to set its own policies for the admission of students from other schools to such courses. 

A student who cross-registers is subject to the policy for incompletes at the school into 
which he or she cross-registers. 

It should be noted that, although the following listings were accurate when published, 
each school issues a list of changes and corrections just prior to registration for each quarter. 
Students should consult these lists through the registrar of each school before registering for 
courses. 



43 



COURSES 



FALL 1997 
Biblical Studies 

CTU 547 
Biblical Methods 

Seminar investigates several methods currently 
used to interpret biblical texts. The methods, 
with their presuppositions and possibilities, will 
be applied to various texts and evaluated for their 
effectiveness in opening up the meaning of 
Scripture. L 
Bergant M 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU BC490x 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

(For course description see World Mission 

Studies.) 

Lenchak MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

LSTC B-333 

The Bible: Its Message and Content 

The course is intended for students needing a 

basic introduction to the Bible and its content. 

Reading of the Bible will be supplemented with 

information on biblical times, geography, and 

history. 

Krentz M 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

LSTC B-443 
Scripture by Heart 

How to interpret biblical stories, learn them by 
heart, and give them as oral presentations for 
Bible study, worship, preaching, teaching, spiri- 
tual discipline, and other aspects of congrega- 
tional life. 
Rhoads T 6-9 p.m. Fall 

MTS B-300 

Introduction to Biblical Studies 

An overview of content and approaches to Scrip- 
ture that are responsible to church and academy. 
Exegesis of texts from Hebrew Bible and New 
Testament. Special attention to literary types, 
historical contexts, methods, and resources for 
understanding. 
Brawley/Hiebert MW 10-11:50 Fall 



MTS B/E-460 

The Bible, the Family, and Contemporary 

Culture 

Attempt to analyze, understand, and evaluate 
family images in contemporary culture and the 
Bible, in order to bring these images into dis- 
cussion about family values. Attention to social 
realities of biblical and contemporary worlds. 
Case studies. 
Hiebert/Livezey W 6-8:50 p.m. Fall 

S-WTS 01/02-503S 

Introduction to Biblical Languages 

The course is designed to provide a very basic 
understanding of biblical Greek and biblical 
Hebrew, as they are located within their lan- 
guage families. The alphabets, some vocabulary, 
and other appropriate exegetical tools will be 
studied. 
Deeley TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

Old Testament 

I. Introductory 

CTS CH301 

People and Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the 
historical, literary, and theological interpretation 
of the Hebrew Scriptures. Special attention 
given to Pentateuch and narrative history 
(Joshua-2 Kings). 
Stone T 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTU B300f 

Introduction to the Old Testament 

A study of the traditions and literature of an- 
cient Israel against their historical and cultural 
background. Attention will also be given to some 
of the literary and theological issues involved 
in biblical interpretation. 
Okoye MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Okoye T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

GETS 11-51 If 

Old Testament Interpretation 

A comprehensive introduction to the legal, his- 



44 



Old Testament 



torical, poetic, and prophetic books of the Hebrew 
Scriptures, with emphasis on the order and con- 
tents, cultural settings, literary forms, religious 
themes, and interpretive approaches. L 
Duncan TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

Duncan Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

MW 5:30-7:30 p.m. 



II. Canonical Corpus 

CTS CH400 

Selected Passages from the Pentateuch 

An in-depth inquiry into the setting, meaning, 
theology, and personal application of key pas- 
sages in Books 2-5 of the Pentateuch. 
Schaalmann Th 9-12 Fall 



LSTC B-310f 

Pentateuch and Historical Books 

Designed to be the introductory course in the 
field. Studies in literary, historical, and theo- 
logical questions arising in the interpretation of 
these books in the Old Testament. (Winter/ 
Spring session is a distance learning course.) 
Fuerst MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Klein MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Klein Winter-Spring 

F 6-9 p.m. + S 9-12 
Feb. 13-14, Mar. 13-14, April 10-11, 
May 8-9, June 12-13 (Chicago- Apple ton) 

LSTC B-311A 

Old Testament Methods of Study 

Introducing students to the methods used in Old 
Testament exegesis. Hebrew will not be re- 
quired, but students who can use it will be af- 
forded the opportunity. 

Fuerst Th 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

meets at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, St. Charles 



NBTS OT301 
The Pentateuch 

An introduction to the critical, historical, and 
theological study of the Pentateuch with special 
attention given to the major themes of the 
Pentateuch. L 
Mariottini T 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 

NPTS BIBL6120 
Old Testament Faith I 

An introduction to the Torah and Former Proph- 
ets of the Old Testament in the context of the 
ancient Near East. Includes an introduction to 
major OT narrative genres and the principles 
for properly interpreting them. 
TBA Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 Th 6:15-9:10 p.m. 



CTU B405 
Deuteronomistic History 

A general study of the formation, function, and 
the theological themes of the Deuteronomistic 
historical work. The features are further illus- 
trated through a more detailed study and exege- 
sis of sections of the Book of Joshua. 
Okoye MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

G-ETS 11 -601 A 
Pentateuch: Genesis 

Advanced study of literary units and theologi- 
cal themes. Emphasis on analytical and synthetic 
interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511. L 
Bird TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 



G-ETS 11-602 
Historical Books: Judges 

Advanced study of literary units and theologi- 
cal themes. Emphasis on analytical and syn- 
thetic interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511 or 
equiv. L 
Duncan F 9-12 Fall 

NBTS OT302H 

Los profetas anteriores 

Una introduction al estudio critico, historico, y 
teologico de los libros de Josue, Jueces, Samuel, 
y Reyes. 
Horning Th 2:30-5:10 Fall 



NBTS OT304 
The Major Prophets 

An introduction to the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, 
and Ezekiel. This class will also emphasize the 
historical, political, social, and religious situa- 
tions that are an integral part of the message of 
the Major Prophets. 
Mariottini T 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



45 



Old Testament 



NBTS OT417 
The Book of Daniel 

A historical and theological introduction to 
Daniel, with special attention to the apocalyp- 
tic movement and the complex background that 
gave rise to the book. 
Mariottini Th 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 

NBTS OT463 

The Book of Jeremiah 

This class will offer an exegetical and theologi- 
cal study of the book of Jeremiah. Special em- 
phasis will be given to his life, his ministry, and 
his personal struggles with God. Prereq: a pre- 
vious course in OT. L 
Mariottini Sa 9:30-12:15 Fall 

NPTS BIBL 6220/MNST 6220 

Biblical Preaching: The Book of Proverbs 

Practice in moving from biblical text to sermon 
with a focus on Proverbs. Issues related to 
preaching from the biblical genre represented 
will be discussed as students prepare and de- 
liver sermons. 2 hours. 

Koptak Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 Th 6-10 p.m. 

III. Topics in Old Testament 

CTS CH601 

Contemporary Hermeneutical Strategies 

Advanced seminar exploring a range of emerg- 
ing hermeneutical strategies (literary, social-sci- 
entific, liberationist, feminist, Afrocentrist, 
womanist, deconstructive, psychoanalytic) with 
attention to impact of global and post-Holocaust 
consciousness. 
Stone Th 9-12 Fall 

CTU B415 

Later Prophecy 

A study of selected texts from exilic and 
postexilic prophets. Emphasis on the relation- 
ship of prophecy to ancient Israel's social and 
religious institutions. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
Hoppe W 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

CTU B415H 

Later Prophecy in Hebrew Text 

A study of selected texts from exilic and 



postexilic prophets. Emphasis on the relation- 
ship of prophecy to ancient Israel's social and 
religious institutions. Prereq: B 325 or equiv. 
Hoppe MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

LSTC B-640 

Graduate Biblical Seminar III 

An ongoing seminar on the Old Testament. 
Theme for 1998: biblical Hebrew poetry in the 
service of exegesis. (For post-M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Michel T 12:30-3:45 Fall 

NBTS OT462 

Preaching from the Old Testament 

This class will help students to acquire the ba- 
sic knowledge and skills necessary for interpret- 
ing the Old Testament in its literary, historical, 
and theological contexts as preparation for 
preaching. Prereq: one 300-level OT class. L 
Mariottini TTh 9:30-10:50 Fall 

IV. Hebrew Language 

LSTC B-300 
Biblical Hebrew I 

An introduction to the grammar of Hebrew, de- 
signed to equip students to use the language in 
exegetical work. Credit is given for this course 
alone, but the grammar cycle is completed in 
Biblical Hebrew II. 
Klein Sept. 2-19 Fall Preterm 

M-F 8:30-11:30 
Michel MWTh 1-2:15 Fall 

MTS B-321 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis I 

First part of a nondivisible, two-quarter se- 
quence. Hebrew grammar, translation, and ex- 
egesis of primarily prose portions of Hebrew 
Bible, fundamentals of text criticism, and gen- 
eral principles of interpretation. Credit only upon 
completion of B-322. 
TEA Sept. 9-20 TBA Fall Preterm 

MTS B-322 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis II 

Completes the sequence begun in B-321; see 

course description above. 

TBA TF 10-1 1:50 Fall 



46 



New Testament 



NPTS BIBL6100 
Beginning Hebrew I 

A survey of the rudiments of Biblical Hebrew 
including basic grammar concepts and the strong 
verb. A special emphasis on vocabulary building. 
Bruckner Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 TTh 8-9:20 

NPTS BIBL6102 
Intermediate Hebrew 

To assist students in developing a greater facil- 
ity with the Hebrew language, various texts from 
the Hebrew Bible are selected for reading and 
discussion. Prereq: BIBL 6100 and 6101. 1 hour. 
Koptak Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 TEA 



New Testament 



LSTC B-332 

The Life and Letters of Paul 

Study of the unique character and thought of Paul 
in the context of the first-century world. Stu- 
dents will interpret Paul's letters and explore 
themes in his theology and ethics. 
Rossing T 6-9:50 p.m. Fall 

Krentz MW 8:15-9:50 Fall 

NPTS BIBL 5111 

Introduction to New Testament Greek 
Exegesis 

Procedures and tools used in exegetical process, 
textual criticism, translation, syntax, theologi- 
cal applications, application to ministry. Expe- 
rience gained through exegesis of a New Testa- 
ment book. Prereq: BIBL 5109 and 5110 (Be- 
ginning Greek). 

Belleville Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 TTh 10:30-11:50 



I. Introductory 

G-ETS 12-501f 

New Testament Interpretation: Matthew- 
Acts 

Theory and practice of exegesis in relation to 
selected passages, including textual, literary, 
form, and redaction criticism, and the use of pro- 
grammed instruction. Exploration of the theol- 
ogy of the evangelists. Lectures and section 
meetings. L 

Vena MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

Vena Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

W 9-10:50 + F 9-11:50 



LSTC B-331f 

Jesus and the Gospels 

A study of the four Gospels and the way each 
author structured and edited the tradition to re- 
spond to the specific needs of the church. Intro- 
duction to current reconstructions of the life of 
Jesus. (Fall/Winter session is a distance learn- 
ing course.) 

Rossing Fall/Winter 

F 6-9 p.m. +S 9-12 
Sept. 26-27, Oct. 10-11, Nov. 14-15, 
Dec. 12-13, Jan. 9-10 (Chicago- Appleton) 

Krentz MW 1-2:50 Spring 

Rhoads MW 1-2:50 Spring 



NPTS BIBL 5150 

Interpreting the New Testament I 

In this introductory treatment of the Gospels, 
attention is given to hermeneutics, critical stud- 
ies, the characteristics and message of each of 
the Gospels, and Jesus' proclamation of the 
Kingdom. 

Snodgrass Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 TTh 8-9:20 

NPTS BIBL5151f 

Interpreting the New Testament II 

This course is a survey of Acts through Revela- 
tion with special emphasis on the interpretive 
issues, historical context, distinctive content, 
theological peculiarities, and contemporary rel- 
evance of Acts and the NT letters. 
Phelan Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 M 6: 15-9: 10 p.m. 

Belleville Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April30 M 1:50-4:45 

II. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B440 

The Gospel According to John 

A study with attention to this Gospel's distinc- 
tive style and theology, overall structure, and 
content. Key sections used to highlight such 



47 



New Testament 

major Johannine motifs as religious symbolism, 
sacraments, community, and spirituality. Prereq: 
B 305 orequiv. 
Senior M 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

CTU B457 

The Shorter Pauline Letters 

In-depth study of four Pauline letters in their 
historical, social, literary, and theological con- 
text. Prereq: B 305 or equiv. 
Osiek TTh 11:30-12:45 Fall 

G-ETS 12-601 
The Gospel of John 

Exegetical study of the fourth Gospel. Explora- 
tion of the theology of the evangelist in relation 
to problems of his times; attention to its under- 
lying thought world. Prereq: 12-501. L 
Vena TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

MTS B-447 
Luke- Acts 

Focus on development of interpretive skills with 
use of historical, literary, and sociological ex- 
egetical methods. Attention to nature of the lit- 
erature and Lucan theology. 
Brawley TTh 10-11:50 Fall 



criticism, study of Luke in relation to the other 

Gospels, and recent analyses of Lucan theology. 

Discussion sections for both Greek and English 

texts. 

Pervo TTh 1-2:50 Fall 

TEDS NT 725 
Revelation 

Intensive historical, doctrinal, and critical study 
of the Apocalypse; interpretation of its messages 
and visions, with consideration of the preterist, 
historic, idealist, and futurist positions. Prereq: 
reading knowledge of Greek or permission. 
Osborne Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 

III. Topics in New Testament 

CTS CH429 

Romans: A Theological/Political Reading 

Course emphasizes social, political, and theo- 
logical dimensions of the themes of justice (righ- 
teousness), legality (law), and loyalty (faith) 
crucial to Paul's argument. Dialogue with theo- 
logical exegesis (Luther, Barth) will inform our 
discussion. 
Jennings T 2-5 Fall 



MTS B-472H 

Las cartas pastorales 

Estudio de las cartas pastorales ( 1 and 2 Timoteo 
y Tito) en su contexto historico, literario, y so- 
cial. Estudiaremos las cartas en el contexto del 
desarrollo del cristianismo primitivo y 
postpaulino. Requisito: B-300 o su equivalente. 
Cortes-Fuentes Th 6-8:50 p.m. Fall 

NPTS BIBL5165 
Ephesians 

The analysis of this letter focuses on its teach- 
ing about salvation, life in Christ, and the church. 
The relation of Ephesians to Colossians is also 
considered. 2 hours. 

Snodgrass Fall Semester, Quad B 

Oct. 20-Dec. 4 TTh 3:15-5:05 

S-WTS 02-60 IS 

The Gospel According to Luke 

Interpretation of the third Gospel in its histori- 
cal context. Major emphasis will include form 



CTS CH435 

Parables in the New Testament 

The parables of Jesus will be examined in terms 
of their original context and the present context. 
Snyder M 9-12 Fall 

CTU B525 

Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus' Jewish 

Background 

Designed to deepen the student's understand- 
ing of the relationship of early Christianity to 
rabbinic Judaism and to develop a capacity to 
interpret Jewish sources from Talmud and 
Midrash, this course examines the nature of rab- 
binic Judaism. 
Perelmuter T 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU BW465 

Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

An overview of worship forms in the contempo- 
rary American synagogue with special reference 
to the common thread and variations in the Jew- 



48 



Historical Studies 



ish denominations and to historical backgrounds. 
(This course is sponsored by the Jewish 
Chautauqua Society.) 
Perelmuter MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

G-ETS 12-613 

The Thessalonian Correspondence 

Study of redaction and situation of two letters 
to Thessalonica; emphasis on questions of au- 
thenticity, sequence, and modern interpretation. 
Relation between Paul's message in these ear- 
liest letters and problems of modern congrega- 
tions. Prereq: 12-502. L 
Yeo T 6-9 p.m. Fall 

LSTC B-660 

Graduate Biblical Seminar V: Rhetoric and 

the Minor Pauline Epistles 

1 Thessalonians. Galatians, Philippians, and 
Colossians in the light of rhetorical analysis. 
Readings in ancient rhetorical texts and mod- 
ern rhetorical analysis. (For post-M.Div. students; 
admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Krentz Th 1-4:30 Fall 

NPTS BIBL6251 

The Ministry and Teachings of Jesus 

Dominant themes and perspectives of Jesus' 
ministry and teachings, including fatherhood of 
God, Jesus' self-consciousness, kingdom of God, 
miracles, parables, the Law, the church, ethics 
of the kingdom, marriage and divorce, and 
Christ's return. 2 hours. 

Belleville Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 TTh 3:15-5:05 

IV. New Testament Greek 

CTU B320 
Biblical Greek I 

A basic introduction to the grammar and vocabu- 
lary of the Greek New Testament. 
Osiek MTWTh 8:30-9:30 Fall 

G-ETS 12-641 
Elementary Greek I 

Essential forms and principles of New Testa- 
ment Greek. Two-unit course; credit for 12-641 
upon satisfactory completion of 12-642. 
Stegner TWThF 8-8:50 Fall 



LSTC B-307 
Biblical Greek I 

An introduction to Greek, designed to equip stu- 
dents to use the language in exegetical work. 
LSTC M.Div. students are required to complete 
the Greek sequence with B-308 Biblical Greek II. 
Holloway MWTh 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC B-309f 

Greek Readings: The Lectionary Lessons 

Yearlong class meeting weekly. Students attend 
the scheduled one-hour practicum on the Greek 
lessons, do weekly assignments, and meet oc- 
casionally with the instructor. 
Choi T 12-12:50 Fall 

Choi M 12-12:50 Winter 

Choi M 12-12:50 Spring 

NBTS BL350L 

New Testament Greek I 

This course, together with BL 35 1 L New Testa- 
ment Greek II, is a basic introduction to the 
grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Tes- 
tament. Skills for translation are developed. 
Taught bilingually in Spanish and English. 
Horning TTh 1-2:20 Fall 

NPTS BIBL5109 

Beginning New Testament Greek I 

A survey of the rudiments of biblical Greek. The 
focus is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the 
development of reading skills. 
Katter Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 MWF 1-2:15 

NPTS BIBL5112 

New Testament Greek Readings 

The course is designed to increase the facility of stu- 
dents to read and translate New Testament Greek. 
Pass/fail. Prereq: BBBL 5109 and 51 10. 1 hour. 
Belleville Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 TBA 

Historical Studies 

I. Introductory 

CTS CH344 

History of Christian Thought I: Foundations 

A survey of significant theological, social, and 



49 



Historical Studies 



political movements of the early Christian 
church through the late Middle Ages, focusing 
on the Western church. 
Thistle thwaite T 9-12 Fall 

CTU H307 

The Middle Ages and the Reformation 

Council of Chalcedon (451) to the Council of 
Trent ( 1 545-1 563), focusing on development of 
the medieval church, relations between East and 
West, history of theology, breakdown of the 
medieval synthesis, and the significance of the 
major reformers. 
Madigan T 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

GETS 13-50 If 
History of Christianity I 

A survey of the life, thought, and development 
of Christianity from the post- Apostolic period 
to the Great Schism (a.d. 1054). L 
Ruether TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

TBA Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 8:30-10:50 

GETS 13-503f 

History of Christianity HI 

Key events, people, and concepts in the 19th 
and 20th centuries. Attention to theological, ethi- 
cal, and institutional formulations, power struc- 
tures, and contributions of the black church, 
women, and Third World Christians. Discussion 
section required. L 

Murphy MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

TBA TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTC H-310 

Early and Medieval Church History 

A basic introduction to Christian history and 
theology until the Reformation. Lectures and 
discussions of primary sources by both men 
and women of the early and medieval peri- 
ods. 

Mclntyre MTh 10:45-12 Fall 

Nelson Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 

meets at ELCA, 8765 W. Higgins Rd. 

MTS H-300f 

Transformations of Christianity: A 

Foundational Course 

Survey of the history and transformations of 



Christianity by exploring the formation and de- 
velopment of major epochs: early, medieval, 
Reformation, modern. 

Daniels TTh 10-11:50 Fall 

Rodriguez-Diaz MW 6-7:50 p.m. Spring 

MTS H-412 

The Reformation Era 

Historical and theological overview of European 
Christianity in 16th and 17th centuries from later 
medieval Catholicism through divisions of the 
Thirty Years War, including Lutheran, 
Zwinglian, Calvinist, radical reformers, and the 
English Reformation. 
Sawyer M 1-3:50 Fall 

NBTS CH301 

Early and Medieval Christianity 

An examination of issues and developments in 
Christian life and thought from the end of the 
1st century to the end of the 15th century. 
Weber T 2:30-5:10 Fall 

NPTS HIST 6210 

Christian Tradition and Mission 

This introductory course surveys the history 
of Christian life and thought from the early 
church to the present. Focusing on persons, 
events, and developing traditions, the course 
also examines the missional life of the Chris- 
tian church. 

Anderson/Graham Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 M 1:50-4:45 

S-WTS 03-50 IS 

The Early Church (100-^00 C.E.) 

A survey of church history from the time of the 
Apostolic Fathers to that of St. Gregory the 
Great, with emphasis upon the development of 
ecclesial and theological traditions. 
Pervo MW 1-2:50 Fall 

II. History of Particular Traditions 

CTU DC576f 

Black Theology in Dialogue 

Critical examination of historical roots, mean- 
ing, methods, content, and development of black 
theology in the U.S. and its dialogue with Afri- 
can, Latin American, and feminist liberation 



50 



theologies. Implications for church's mission and 

ministry. 

Phelps T 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

Phelps T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



CTU H430 

Vatican II and the Aftermath 

Part one of the course concentrates on the is- 
sues of Vatican II: liturgy, collegiality, laity, re- 
ligious life, ecumenism and religious liberty, 
revelation. The second part examines key issues 
in the modern church to see if Vatican II responds 
to them. 
Ross W 1:15-4 Fall 



MTS H-421 

20th-century Christianity: Global 

Pentecostalism 

A comparative study of the emergence and de- 
velopment of global Pentecostalism as an indig- 
enous Christian movement in North America, 
Africa, and South America. Includes classical 
Pentecostalism, charismatic renewal, and Afri- 
can indigenous churches. 
Daniels T 6-8:50 p.m. Fall 



Historical Studies 
IV. American Church History 

G-ETS 13-642 

Topics in American Religious History: 

Religion and the City 

Examination of significant issues, movements, 
and persons. Prereq: 13-50 1 , 502, 503, or equiv. 
Murphy WF 9-10:50 Fall 

NBTS CH360 

History of the African American Religious 

Experience in America 

This course seeks to trace the development and 
history of the African American religious expe- 
rience and church in America from the African 
Diaspora to the present. 
Butler Th 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 

TEDS CH736 
American Church History 

Transition of European churches to America and 
their involvement with theological, liturgical, 
social, and political issues; Puritanism, separa- 
tion of church and state; revivals; social con- 
cern; liberalism, fundamentalism, neoorthodoxy, 
evangelicalism. 

Woodbridge Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 



S-WTS 03-52 IS 

Origins and Development of Anglicanism 

An exploration of the beginnings of Anglicanism 
as both a series of events and a broader spiri- 
tual movement. Follows the development of 
Anglicanism from the English Reformation 
through the late 1 8th century, when it became a 
global communion. 
Barker WF 9-10:50 Fall 



TEDS CH742 
Patristic Age 

Introduction to Christian life and thought be- 
tween close of the New Testament canon and 
beginnings of medieval period under Pope Gre- 
gory I (ca. 600) with emphasis on the major 
church fathers through primary and relevant sec- 
ondary sources. 

Nettles Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 



V. Topics in Church History 

CTU CH525x 

Early Christianity in Asia 

(For course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Kaserow T 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU DS554 

Vatican II and a Spirituality for Family 

and the World of Work 

Vatican II defines the church as the "People of 
God" and locates this people in the modern 
world. This seminar will explore several ele- 
ments of this teaching that contribute to a spiri- 
tuality for family and the world of work. 
Linnan M 1-3:45 Fall 

MS HI381 

The Catholic Church in Totalitarian Societies 

The experience of totalitarian and authoritarian 
regimes had enormous influence on Catholic life. 



51 



Theological Studies 



This course examines the intellectual, theologi- 
cal, and political life in these societies in order 
to assess the Church's response. 
Hennessey MTh 8:25-9:55 Fall 



Theological Studies 

I. Introductory and Foundational 

CTS CH344x 

History of Christian Thought I: Foundations 

(For course description see Historical Studies I.) 
Thistlethwaite T 9-12 Fall 

CTS TEC 500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of theologi- 
cal interpretation aiming at developing skills in 
relating theological perspectives to the concrete 
human situation. (Permission required for non- 
CTS students.) 
Edgerton T 9-12 Fall 

CTU D295 

Philosophical Foundations of Catholic 

Theology 

Survey of major streams of Western philosophi- 
cal tradition and their contribution to develop- 
ment of Catholic theology; designed to assist 
students in integrating their studies in philo- 
sophical and intellectual history. 
Linnan T 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU D325f 

Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and meth- 
ods of theology worked out from a study of sev- 
eral case histories. Special emphasis on histori- 
cal revelation in Christianity and the develop- 
ing awareness of faith in relation to shifting 
horizons. 

Hayes TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

Bevans TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

GETS 21-500f 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contempo- 
rary Theology 

Introduction to cross-cultural study of system- 
atic theology. Examines factors affecting the 



Euro-American context in relation to African, 
Asian, and Latin American contexts and philo- 
sophical and cultural developments affecting 
theological method. 

Will TTh 3:30-5:20 Fall 

D. Vogel MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

GETS 21-501f 
Systematic Theology I 

The meaning and methods of systematic theol- 
ogy; Christian understanding of God, Trinity, 
creation, persons and history, and eschatology. 
Prereq: three foundational courses in Bible and 
history and 21-500. 

Young TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

Will Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

T 6-9:30 p.m. 

LSTC T-301 
Unity and Diversity 

Exposes students to classic theological state- 
ments in Catholic Christianity and in the 
Lutheran tradition. Also addresses the global and 
multicultural mission of the church and how 
Christian and Lutheran identity is defined by 
context. Double course. 

Jiirisson/Perry/Fuerst/Westhelle Fall Preterm 

Sept. 2-19 M-F 8:30-12:30 

+ a weekend 

LSTC T-311 
Christian Theology I 

The first of a three-course sequence providing a 
survey of the basic doctrines of the Christian 
faith, helping students develop their own theo- 
logical perspectives. Topics in first term include 
the doctrines relating to the First Article of the 
Creed. 

Hiitter W 6-9 p.m. Fall 

Westhelle MTh 10:45-12 Fall 



MTS 1-478 

Seminar on Research Methods 

For master's students. Teaches "how to" of ef- 
fective argumentation; examines and critiques 
models of methodologies from the various fields. 
Students will develop and refine research pro- 
posals. Prereq: coursework in three fields. 
TEA F 9-11:50 Fall 



52 



NBTS IN 301 
Faith and Theology 

This course introduces the student to the major 

loci in theological construction. Historical and 

traditional engagements with theological issues 

will be correlated with the student's confession 

of faith and the foundations for the practice of 

ministry. 

Sharp W 2:30-5: 10 Fall 

NBTS IN301H 

Fe, teologfa, y religion desde el reverso de 
la historia 

Analisis historico-teologico de diferentes 
maneras de "hacer teologia" en e! mundo 
nortatlantico y sus desarrollos en relacion a 
condicionamientos historicos. Se consideraran 
teologias contextuales como expresiones de 
hacer teologia desde "el reverso. " 
Mottesi TBA, intensive Fall 

NPTS MNST5100 

Resources for Theological Education 

Introduction to basic research methodology and 
the basic print and electronic reference tools of 
theological bibliography including Internet re- 
sources. Experience with a wide variety of ref- 
erence tools. 1 hour. 

Snodgrass/Sutton Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 M 8-9:50 

NPTS THEO5200 

Introduction to Theological Method 

An introduction to theology with the goal of giv- 
ing students the tools necessary to benefit from 
the subject matter of subsequent courses in sys- 
tematic theology. 2 hours. 
Bray Fall Semester, Quad B 

Oct. 20-Dec. 4 M 8-12:50 

NPTS THEO6330 
Theological Foundations 

This is the study of the foundation of human 
existence, salvation, and hope (the Triune 
God) as seen by Christian faith, and of the 
central expression of the Christian faith, the 
personwork of Jesus Christ as attested in 
Scripture. 

Weborg Fall Semester 

Aug.25-Dec.4 TTh 10:30-11:50 



Theological Studies 
II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

CTS TEC 410 

Ken Wilber: Integrating Spirituality and 

Transpersonal Psychology 

The ideas of meditator, philosopher, and psy- 
chologist Ken Wilber provide an elegant link 
between contemporary psychology and spiri- 
tuality. The seminar will investigate the theo- 
logical and psychological implications of his 
work. 
Cairns M 2-5 Fall 

CTU D521 

The Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx 

A seminar on the main lines in the thought of 
Edward Schillebeeckx, emphasizing his under- 
standing of the relation of God and the world 
and questions of hermeneutics. 
Schreiter W 1-3:45 Fall 

GETS 21-612 
Theology of Paul Tillich 

An assessment of the theological use of exis- 
tential themes in the theology and sermons of 
Paul Tillich. L 
Will MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

GETS 21-630 
Black Theology 

A seminar course for reading, discussing, and 
writing on themes of theology from the perspec- 
tive of the black experience. 
Young TTh 3:30-5 Fall 



GETS 21-642 

Judaism in the Early Christian Period 

Examination of the postbiblical literature of 
Judaism, with emphasis on the Talmud — its 
structure, history, and theology; thought currents 
in the centuries paralleling early Christianity. 
One-half unit. 
Schaalmann T 3:30-5 Fall 



LSTC T-602 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Kierkegaard 

The seminar will concentrate on the ethical and 
religious writings of S0ren Kierkegaard as a lens 



53 



Theological Studies 



through which to view issues in 19th-century 

Protestant theology. P 

Busse T 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 



NPTS THE0 5143 
The Evangelical Church 

A study of the theology, practice, and variety of 
American evangelicalism with special attention 
given to current issues and contemporary fig- 
ures. 2 hours. 

Bray Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 T 6-10 p.m. 



the oppressed, God's "Name," models of God. 
This tie thwaite W 9-12 Fall 

CTU D430f 

Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

Analysis of why God has become problematic 
for contemporary society, followed by critical 
review of representative Christian attempts to 
respond. The course helps students evaluate their 
experience and respond intelligently to the mod- 
ern problem of God. 

Linnan MW 10-11:15 Fall 

Hayes MW 10-11:15 Winter 



S-WTS 05-61 OS 
Anglican Theology 

The course will explore the question of what is 
distinctive about Anglican identity by a close 
reading and assessment of selected Anglican 
thinkers such as Hooker, Taylor, Butler, Wesley, 
Maurice, Kirk, and Temple. 
TBA Th 9-11:50 Fall 



III. Topics in Theology 

CTS CH429x 

Romans: A Theological/Political Reading 

(For course description see New Testament III.) 
Jennings T 2-5 Fall 

CTS TEC 437 

The Psychology of the Oppressed and 

Liberation Theologies 

Course will consider the experiences of race, 
class, and gender oppression. Phenomenologi- 
cal positions will be critiqued psychologically 
to understand liberative theological motivations. 
Works from Latin American, womanist, femi- 
nist, and black theology. 
Butler T 2-5 Fall 



CTU DC 442 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral 
Ministry 

Studies Jesus the Christ revealed through Scrip- 
ture, traditions, and theological scholarship, to 
help students understand the meaning of Jesus 
Christ for their personal life, for contemporary 
society, and as ground for mission or pastoral 
practice. 
Phelps TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU DH524 

Roman Catholic Theology in an Age of 

Revolution 

This seminar will study the conflicts within 
Roman Catholic thought in the context of the 
intellectual, cultural, and political upheavals of 
19th-century Europe. 
Hayes W 10-12:45 Fall 

GETS 21-638 

Theology and Film: Joy of Viewing/ 

Teaching Movies 

Analysis of classic theology and film. Develop- 
ing strategies that will increase understanding 
of contemporary movies. 
S. Vaux T 6-9 p.m. Fall 



CTS TEC462x 

Issues in Pastoral Theology 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Butler Th 9-12 Fall 



CTS TEC 511 
Doctrines of God 

The Trinity, creation and providence, God and 



LSTC M-488 

Theology, Culture, and the Creative Arts 

Students will come to understanding of a "the- 
ology of culture" from models presented by Karl 
Rahner, Karl Barth, and Paul Tillich. Further 
reflection on theologies at work today in North 
American culture. Project on an aspect of popu- 
lar culture. 
Jensen TTh 1-2:15 Fall 



54 



M/L TS305 

Formative Figures in Practical Theology 

and Religious Education 

Exploration of formative figures from Social 
Gospel movement, American pragmatism, lib- 
eration theology, and other movements who in- 
fluenced development of religious education 
theory and practice. Attention to contemporary 
theorists and emerging issues. 
Harlow TBA Fall 



MTS T-319 

Theology in the 20th Century: Unanswered 

Questions 

A retrospective survey of 20th-century Chris- 
tian theology to highlight broadening and con- 
verging trends that raise problems and open new 
vistas for theology in the 21st century. Read- 
ings will focus on major representative theolo- 
gies and movements. 
Parker M 1-3:50 Fall 



MTS T-404 
Doctrine of Christ 

Considers the doctrine of the person and work 

of Jesus Christ as the basis for Christian faith 

in God. Particular attention to problems of the 

uniqueness and the universality of Jesus Christ 

vis-a-vis other bases of faith. Prereq: T-300 or 

equiv. 

Parker TTh 10-11:50 Fall 



Theological Studies 

el desarrollo, las fuentes, metodos, hermeneutica 
y una muestra de teologos/as protestantes y 
catolicos latinos. 
Rivera-Rodriguez W 9-11:50 Fall 



NETS TH470 

Thinking about Revelation 

Assesses a variety of views of revelation from 
the standpoint of their historical and theologi- 
cal origins and their influence on subsequent 
theological formulation. Attention given to for- 
mulation of doctrinal statements and their epis- 
temological claims. 
Sharp Sa 9:30-12:10 Fall 



NCTI Seminar I 

(=G-ETS 40-NCTI, MS SY429, 

NPTS THEO 6279, S-WTS CTI/FALL97, 

TEDS PT 675) 

The Church and Its Mission 

Explores the views of several major Christian 
communions on the nature of the church and its 
mission with lectures by representatives from 
these denominations and field trips by student 
teams to congregations of each communion. 
Meets at various locations. 
Butler et al. Fall 

Oct. 1 W 7-9 p.m. 
+ 2 weekends (Oct. 17-18, Nov. 7-8) 



MTS T-430 

God, Suffering, and Evil 

If God is good and all-powerful, why is there so 
much suffering and evil in the world? Various 
attempts to answer the question will be consid- 
ered and evaluated as we explore the theologi- 
cal problems that the question raises. Prereq: 
T-300 or equiv. 
Case-Winters W 9-11:50 Fall 



MTS T-437H 

Temas de la teologia hispana en Estados 

Unidos 

El curso explora los temas y representantes 
claves de la emergente teologia hispana/latina 
en los Estados Unidos. Se analiza el contexto, 



S-WTS 05-634S 

The Holy Spirit and Grace 

A study of the history and significance of the 
doctrine of the Holy Spirit and its relationship 
to grace in the Christian life. 
Griffiss TTh 3-4:50 Fall 



TEDS PR 611 

History of Philosophy of Religion I 

Religious and theological issues in the princi- 
pal thinkers of the Western philosophical tradi- 
tion in the ancient and medieval periods such 
as Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Augustine, 
Avicenna, Anselm, Aquinas, Scotus, and 
Ockham. 

Ware Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 



55 



Ethical Studies 

Ethical Studies 

I. Moral Theology 

CTS TEC 321 

Christian Ethics 

Course examines moral codes, divine command- 
ments, and legal proscriptions that influence the 
development of Christianity, and how the his- 
torical expressions of these systems in various 
communions have led to competing moral theo- 
ries in Christian thought. 
Terrell M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTU E370f 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

This course is an introductory study of the 
basic themes of Christian ethics. Particular 
attention will be paid to the Roman Catholic 
moral tradition, including such topics as the 
virtues, natural law, moral decision making, 
and narrative. 

Nairn T 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

Wadell TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU E500 

The Making of Moral Theology 

This course will be an overview of the develop- 
ment of Catholic moral theology from the 
Patristic period to the present. Special attention 
will be given to the directions and concerns of 
Catholic morality since the Second Vatican 
Council. L 
Nairn/Wadell M 8:30-11:15 Fall 

LSTC E-310f 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the sources, structure, and dynamics 
of Christian ethics, with reference to current 
problems of personal and public life. (Not open 
to first-year students.) 

Hutter TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Hutter TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 



ment of happiness, charity, the passions, the vir- 
tues, and the gifts of the Spirit. 
Wadell TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU E590 

Sustaining Life: Ethical Challenges 

An examination of the major global issues of 
our time, including food, energy, environmental 
preservation, and homelessness. Ethical frame- 
works for responding to these issues will be 
developed out of both ecclesiastical and secular 
materials. 
Pawlikowski Th 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU EC 402 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics 

A study of the relevance of some Western and 
non-Western natural law traditions in view of 
arriving at a vision of a universal common good 
that can generate a Christian ethical discourse 
capable of intercultural and interreligious com- 
munication. 
Fornasari MW 1-2:15 Fall 

GETS 22-503 
Theological Ethics 

A foundational course in theology and ethics. 
The formulation and implementation of ethical 
norms derived from faith commitments, based 
on the study of theory and practice (cases); de- 
velopment of a self-conscious methodology. 
Prereq: 21-500. 
K. Vaux T 6-9 p.m. Fall 

GETS 22-507 
Life and Death 

How does biblical faith conceive of life's pas- 
sages? How do we face ethical challenges from 
birth to death? We will study theological, ethi- 
cal, and pastoral texts as we seek to estab- 
lish our own theoretical and practical phi- 
losophy. 
K. Vaux Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 



II. Topics in Ethics 

CTU E456 

The Ethics of Thomas Aquinas 

This course is a study in the moral theology of 
Aquinas. Particular attention is given to his treat- 



M/L E338f 

Democratic Public Theology and Ethics 

The religious, ethical, and political content of 
the democratic faith as a distinct structure of 
belief and action in world history. Course held 
in cooperation with the M/L and Unitarian Uni- 



56 



World Mission Studies 



versalist Association consultation on theology 
and racism. 

Engel Jan. (1 week TBA) M-F 9-5 Winter 
Fall registration required for January intensive 

M/L E439 

Ecology, Religion, Ethics 

An introduction to the primary contending per- 
spectives in the field of environmental ethics and 
the cultural, religious, and philosophical traditions 
that ground them. Study of initiatives to make 
Chicago region ajust and sustainable community. 
Engel F 1:30-4 Fall 

MTS E/B-460 

The Bible, the Family, and Contemporary 

Culture 

(For course description see MTS B/E-460 in 

Biblical Studies.) 

Hiebert/Livezey W 6-8:50 p.m. Fall 

NBTS CHTE401H 

Etica social I: Una perspectiva historica 

tercermundista 

Una inquisicion — desde la perspectiva de los 

pobres — de los mas importantes movimientos y 

pensadores etico-sociales desde la tradicion 

judeo-cristiana y el Nuevo Testamento hasta el 

Renacimiento. 

Mottesi T 2:30-5:10 Fall 



Religion and Society 
Studies 

CTU 1607 

Alternative Social Orders 

A seminar that explores the discussion about 
finding alternative social orders to the one be- 
ing established by neoliberal capitalism in the 
wake of the collapse of the bipolar world. 
Schrieter/Riebe-Estrella Fall 

M 7-9:45 p.m. 

G-ETS 35-634 

American Religion and the News Media 

This course will examine the interactive rela- 
tionship between American religious institutions 
and traditions and the American news media 
(print and electronic). 
Larson Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 



LSTC M-370f 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

A consideration of the church's involvement in 
the public realm. Emphasis will be placed on 
the importance of developing one's ethical 
framework for responding to issues selected by 
the class. 

Perry W 2:30-5:30 Fall 

Perry W 2:30-5:30 Winter 



MS H1381x 

The Catholic Church in Totalitarian 

Societies 

(For course description see Historical Studies V.) 
Hennessey MTh 8:25-9:55 Fall 

NBTS CT303 

Building Multicultural Communities 

This course will promote cultural sensitivity 
through exposure to a variety of cultural tradi- 
tions. A reflection-action approach will betaken 
to examine theological and philosophical pre- 
suppositions that inform heterogeneous commu- 
nity formation. 
Price M 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



TEDS CC701 

Christianity and Contemporary Culture I: 

Critical Assessment 

Critique of contemporary culture from perspec- 
tive of biblical writings. Biblical themes (idola- 
try, cosmos, kingdom, and conformed vs. trans- 
formed minds) provide basis for examining con- 
temporary emphases such as individualism, utili- 
tarianism, pluralism. 

Netland Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 

World Mission Studies 

CTU BC490 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

The attitude of the biblical communities to the 
nonbiblical world will be investigated for di- 
rection in the global mission of the contempo- 
rary church. Material from both of the Testa- 
ments will be studied. 
Lenchak MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 



57 



World Mission Studies 



CTU C410 

Mission: The Contemporary Challenge 

What are the implications of the call to mission 
for every Christian? This course examines mis- 
sion at the limits of our own cultural and reli- 
gious experience, calling for transformation and 
conversion. 
Gittins W 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU C460f 

Training for Cross-Cultural Mission and 

Ministry 

Designed to prepare for cross-cultural and glo- 
bal ministry, using Paulo Freire's methodology 
to provide theological, spiritual, and experien- 
tial dimensions and ecumenical/interfaith dia- 
logue. Optional field trip to Lakota Reservations 
in South Dakota. 

Barbour/Doidge M 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

Schroeder/Doidge M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



CTU DC442x 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral 

Ministry 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Phelps TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU EC402x 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Fornasan MW 1-2:15 Fall 

CTU/LSTC/MTS W-414 

CCGM 1997 Cross-Cultural Quarter 

Two-day orientation (Aug. 21-22); 3-week im- 
mersion at 1 of 4 sites: Appalachia, Ghana, in- 
ner-city Chicago, or South Dakota/Native 
American reservations (Aug. 28-Sept. 20); 2- 
day reorientation (Sept. 23-25); several reflec- 
tion sessions in fall quarter. 
Bliese TEA Fall 



CTU C575f 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar 

An integrating seminar for those returning from 
missionary, cross-cultural, or overseas training 
placements (OTP). L 

Barbour W 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

Schroeder W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU CH525 

Early Christianity in Asia 

This course investigates the earliest contacts of 
Christians with Asian traditions. It distinguishes 
facts, hypotheses, and legends as a framework 
for assessing the significance of such contacts. 
Kaserow T 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU CMP541x 

Marriage and Family in Cross-Cultural 

Context 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Gittins/ Anderson Th 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU CS400 

Discovering Global Spirituality 

The mature forms of spirituality in all the reli- 
gions have common practical, experiential, mys- 
tical elements. This course explores these and 
seeks to formulate what this emerging move- 
ment means for the future of the religions. 
Teasdale MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 



GETS 34-634 
Introduction to Missiology 

Indigenous missional concepts emerging from 
Asia, Africa, and Latin America challenge the 
traditional Western perspective of mission. 
Definition, origin, and development of 
missiology and its relevance for the church 
universal today. 
Alphonse TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

NPTS MNST5150 
Introduction to Missions 

Biblical and theological foundations of the mis- 
sion of the church. History and overview of the 
expansion of Christianity worldwide. Missions 
policy, call, qualifications, and missionary life 
issues. 2 hours. 

Weld Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 T 6-10 p.m. 

NPTS MNST6273 

Christian Encounter with Religious 

Pluralism 

An overview of the major world religions and 
worldviews. Sociological and theological analy- 
sis of contemporary religious movements, popu- 
lar spirituality, and spiritual warfare. Ecumenics, 
apologetics, and dialogue. 2 hours. 
Carlson/Weld Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 M 8-9:50 



58 



Ministry Studies 



TEDS ME 641 

Missionary Anthropology and Sociology 

Application of anthropological and sociological 
insights to problems of missiology; attention to 
fundamentals of culture, differences in structure 
and organization of various societies, the study 
of change and the missionary as a change agent. 
Hiebert Fall Semester 

Sept. I -Dec. 19 TEA 

History of Religions 

LSTC W-428 

Toward Understanding Islam 

This course introduces the student to the ori- 
gins of Islam, the Qufan, Muslim worship, and 
characteristics of Muslim life in the modern 
world, as well as the challenges presented for 
Christian witness. 
Vogelaar TTh 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC W-453 

The Finality of Jesus and Religious 

Pluralism 

Analysis of theological history leading to judg- 
ment by some that Christian theology can no 
longer assert the finality of the "normativeness 
of Jesus Christ." Exploration of resources for 
possible responses to this theological and 
missional challenge. 
Thomsen Th 2:30-5:30 Fall 

LSTC W-529 

Jesus and Muhammad in History and in 

Faith: Rumor and Reality 

Examination of historical descriptions of the 
"other." While clear differences and perceived 
caricatures will be noted, focus is on what Jesus 
and Muhammad may have in common and 
whether such commonality can deepen Chris- 
tian-Muslim conversation today. 
Aasi/Vogelaar MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

Ministry Studies 

I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

CTS CM 300 

The Practice of Christian Ministry 

A course to assist the student in experiencing 



and initiating a style of pastoral and theological 
reflection and to provide perspective on the na- 
ture, history, and practice of ministry in Chris- 
tian vocation. P 
Edgerton W 2-5 Fall 

CTS CM 464 

Family Values from a Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/ 

Transgender Perspective 

Emphasis given to the history of same-sex 
unions, biblical and anthropological notions of 
kinship, the creation of ritual in blessing queer 
unions, and expanding the Christian definition 
of families. 

West/Goss 3 weekends Fall/Spring 

Oct. 10-11, Feb. 6-7, April 24 25 

GETS 34-508 

Congregational Development/Redevelopment 

Designed to empower ministers entering new 

churches to assess the capacities and needs 

of the local churches and communities and 

to create strategies for effective mission and 

outreach. 

Scott TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

GETS 34-628 
Theology of Evangelism 

The gospel as envisaged by the New Testament 
and transmitted by the early church. Its redis- 
covery in the modern period. A review of cur- 
rent debates on evangelism, its meaning and 
relevance to contemporary society. 
Alphonse WF 9-10:50 Fall 

G-ETS 40-675 

Pastoral Effectiveness in a Multicultural 

Context 

Provides a structured learning environment to 
enable students to maximize their cross-cultural 
experiences, helping them to integrate their 
cross-cultural exposure into their theological 
understanding and philosophy of ministry. Two- 
quarter course. 
Codman-Wilson Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 

LSTC M-450 

Senior Seminar: Theology and the 

Church's Ministry 

An integrative course dealing with the role of 
theology in pastoral formation and functioning, 



59 



Ministry Studies 



and based on experiences and problems encoun- 
tered in internship. 

Kleingartner T 2:30-5:30 Fall 

Rodriguez TTh 1 0:45-1 2 Fall 

M/L M308f 

Church Administration 

Considers theories and practice of church orga- 
nizational development, program administration, 
working with volunteers, membership, growth, 
and financial management from systems and 
religious perspectives. L 
TBA Jan. (I week TEA) Winter 

M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required for January intensive 



act? What cultural and religious assumptions are 
brought by clergy and laity? Exploration of reli- 
gious authority in practical context as concep- 
tualized by sociology, psychology, theology, an- 
thropology. 
Cooley/ Gibbons TBA Fall 

MTS M-330 

Introduction to the Hispanic Church and 

Community 

Seminar will provide basic understanding of 
Latino church and community and address is- 
sues in practice of ministry among people of 
color, particularly in the Latino context. 
Rodriguez-Diaz W 2-4:50 Fall 



M/L M358 

Field Education for Eco-Justice Ministry 

Students work with organizations seeking a uni- 
fied approach to environmental and social is- 
sues (toxic waste, land use, transportation) as 
they bear on human welfare and ecological in- 
tegrity. Part of Chicago Program on Ecology, 
Justice, and Faith. Practicum. 
Shadle TBA Fall 

M/L M365 

Introduction to Arts of Ministry: Leadership 

The first of three courses in theory and practice 
of ministry. Practical and theoretical introduc- 
tion to cultural and historical context of religious 
leadership, its purposes and roles. Students 
frame working drafts of their vocational cov- 
enants. 
Bentley/Evison W 9:30-12 Fall 



MTS M-371 

Making a Church Grow: Urban Evangelism 

This course will explore the unique facets of 
doing evangelism in an urban setting. We will 
consider cultural contexts, demographics, avail- 
able evangelism resources, evangelism theolo- 
gies, and evangelism methods. 
Wendorf W 6-8:50 p.m. Fall 

NPTS MNST5172 
Understanding the Congregation 

Using sociological and anthropological perspec- 
tives, this course seeks to analyze and under- 
stand the dynamics of congregational life. A real 
congregation will be used as a learning labora- 
tory. Two hours. 

Carlson Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 T 3:15-8:10 p.m. 



M/L M413f 

Leadership Theory and Practice 

The roles of the liberal religious leader in vari- 
ous contexts. Varieties of leadership styles, 
group dynamics, and development and conflict 
management will be considered. Theoretical and 
practical aspects will be addressed. L 
TBA Jan. (1 week TBA) Winter 

M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required for January intensive 

M/L M430 

Sources of Authority in Ministry 

Out of what authority does a religious leader 



NPTS MNST7375 
Stewardship 

This course focuses on the dimensions of whole- 
life stewardship, becoming a steward in one's 
personal life, and leading congregations in faith- 
ful stewardship. 1 hour. 

Carlson Fall Semester, Quad B 

Oct. 20-Dec. 4 M 6:20-8:10 p.m. 



TEDS PT731 

Pastoral Duties and Church Administration 

Exploration of the whole concept of the minis- 
try and the minister's duties with emphasis on 



60 



Ministry Studies 



church organization, administration, pastoral 
service, and parliamentary procedure. 
Olsen Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 Th 6:30-10 p.m. 

IL Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

CTS CM 565 

Topics in World Spirituality 

Study of scope of world spiritual traditions, cur- 
rent attempts to facilitate communication be- 
tween them, and the challenge of assisting them 
in cooperating on critical life-and-death issues 
that face our species and planet. 
Moore Th 9-12 Fall 



CTS TEC410x 

Ken Wilber: Integrating Spirituality and 

Transpersonal Psychology 

(For course description see Theological Studies II.) 
Cairns M 2-5 Fall 



sic"; examines issues in the historical study of 

spirituality. L 

Lescher Th 8:30-11:15 Fall 

CTU S506 

Issues in Spiritual Formation 

An overview of models and issues involved in 
formation processes, whether they take place in 
the parish, in religious communities, or in free- 
standing programs. 
Lescher T 8:30-11:15 Fall 

G-ETS 34-606 

Prayer in Christian Ministry 

Identifying, exploring, and participating in di- 
verse forms of prayer and meditation, grounded 
in Scripture and tradition. Attention to personal 
spiritual formation and to integration of prayer 
with the functional roles of pastor and Chris- 
tian educator. 
Troxell TTh 3:30-5 Fall 



CTU CS400x 

Discovering Global Spirituality 

(For course description see World Mission Stud- 
ies.) 
Teasdale MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 



CTU DS554x 

Vatican II and a Spirituality for Family 

and the World of Work 

(For course description see Historical Studies V.) 
Linnan M 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU S410 

Introduction to Spiritual Companionship 

History of the notion of spiritual direction; quali- 
ties of the director; aims of the experience; and 
different types and forms of the spiritual dialogue. 
Students will engage in role-playing various col- 
loquies and share in evaluating the experiences. 
Cahill T 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 



M/L TS300 

Models of Contemporary Spirituality 

Critical introduction to contemporary spiritual 
theology in context of practice of ministry. Fig- 
ures covered include Gutierrez, Hahn, Fox, 
Moore. Consideration of development of per- 
sonal spiritual practice and an examination of 
its role in ministry. 
Evison TEA Fall 

MTS M-428 

Prayer Tradition in the African American 

Tradition 

An overview of prayer in the ecumenical Afri- 
can American Christian church context. A look 
at prayer forms; biblical imagery; individual, 
corporate, and communal prayer concerns; and 
the role of African American gospel and sacred 
song in prayer. 
Edwards F 9-11:50 Fall 



CTU S505 

Foundations for the Study of Spirituality 

Defines spirituality as a field of study; explores 
the relationship between spiritual praxis and 
research in spirituality; surveys research meth- 
ods; evaluates the notion of a "spiritual clas- 



NBTS IN 310 

The Art of Interpretation in Ministry 

Formation 

An introductory integrative course aimed at the 
evoking and writing of personal identity narra- 
tives in order to identify strengths and weak- 



61 



Ministry Studies 

nesses in ministry and to set an agenda for theo- 
logical education. 
Nelson Sa 9:30-12:10 Fall 

NBTS MN412 

Readings in Contemporary Spirituality 

A study of the practices of spiritual formation 
such as daily quiet time, reflective reading of 
Scripture, journaling, spiritual direction, retreat, 
and contemplative prayer, as seen in contempo- 
rary writers. 
Clemmons Sa 9:30-12:10 Fall 

NPTS MNST 6207 and 6208 
Discipleship Practicum I and II 

Seeks to prepare students in both theoretical and 
practical dimensions of discipleship as the bibli- 
cal pattern of training leaders is applied to 
discipling in today's church. Students will do actual 
discipling. 1 hour/semester; must enroll for year. 
Reed TEA Fall/Spring Semesters 

NPTS MNST 7306 
Discipleship/Mentoring for Christian 
Growth and Ministry 

Course seeks to provide a comprehensive un- 
derstanding of mentoring with particular empha- 
sis given to discipling. Biblical basis for 
discipling examined and applied to contempo- 
rary Christian living and ministry. Small group 
discipleship encounters. 1 hour. 
Reed Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 M 6:30-9:30 p.m. 

NPTS SPFM5101 

Spiritual Formation: Spiritual Journey 

The spiritual life grows by direction and disci- 
pline. The journal, prayer life, devotional read- 
ing, time management, and simplicity are modes 
of discipline and direction that are examined in 
this course. One-half hour. 
Weborg Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 T 1-3:05 

NPTS SPFM5102 

Spiritual Formation: Life of Prayer 

Presentations and discussion provide intro- 
duction to the scope and variety of the prayers 
and practices of the Christian tradition. Small 
groups provide for further discussion and 



time for prayers with each other. One-half 
hour. 

Carlson Fall Semester, Quad B 

Oct. 20-Dec. 4 T 1-3:05 

III. Pastoral Care 

CTS CM 534 

Advanced Pastoral Care: Pastoral Care of Men 

An advanced seminar in pastoral care focused 
on selected human problems of particular inter- 
est to the student. Seniors, D.Min., Ph.D. stu- 
dents only. 
Moore M 2-5 Fall 

CTS TEC410x 

Ken Wilber: Integrating Spirituality and 

Transpersonal Psychology 

(For course description see Theological Studies II.) 
Cairns M 2-5 Fall 

CTS TEC437x 

The Psychology of the Oppressed and 

Liberation Theologies 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Butler T 2-5 Fall 

CTS TEC 462 

Issues in Pastoral Theology 

Course will explore the issues of theological 
anthropology as they relate to the search for 
human wholeness, justice, and love. Particular 
attention will be given to the categories of spiri- 
tuality and physicality. 
Butler Th 9-12 Fall 

CTU CMP 541 

Marriage and Family in Cross-Cultural 

Context 

"Marriage" and "family" are building blocks of 
the Christian community, but across cultures 
there are diverse forms and patterns. Pastoral 
care and anthropology combine, hoping to un- 
cover new insights and applications for pastors 
and missionaries. 
Gittins/ Anderson Th 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU MP360f 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Focuses on ( 1 ) the many contexts of care; (2) 



62 



Ministry Studies 



principles and dynamics of pastoral care; (3) 
skills in empathic listening and responding to 
various human situations. Time is required out- 
side the class in practice sessions with peers 
and instructors. L 

Anderson MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

Anderson TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

G-ETS 32-501f 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including a study of hu- 
man development, growth, crisis, and pathol- 
ogy; the development of skills in integrating the- 
ology and the practice of ministry with an un- 
derstanding of human growth and interpersonal 
relationships. 

Hinkle Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 

Poling Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. 
Hogue TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 32-609 

The Working Brain and the Work of Theology 

Knowledge of the way the brain works — 
neuropsychological^ — helps us to understand 
the human condition in historical and theologi- 
cal expressions. This changed way of under- 
standing God and ourselves enhances ministe- 
rial practice and human functioning. 
Lee TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

G-ETS 32-620 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling 

Students must have access to pastoral care/coun- 
seling cases. Students will explore the interac- 
tion between culture and personality, as they 
develop pastoral care skills, understandings, and 
strategies. Full-year course; one unit for three 
quarters. L P 
Hinkle TEA Fall/Winter /Spring 

G-ETS 32-631 

Pastoral Counseling: The Pastor as Counselor 

Exposure to theory and practice of pastoral coun- 
seling for the prospective parish pastor. Empha- 
sis on counseling skill development as well as 
theological, cross-cultural, and psychological 
models of interpretation. 
Hinkle F 9-12 Fall 



GETS 32-642 

Older Adults and Persons with Disabling 

Conditions 

Becoming an older and/or disabled adult raises 
profound theological questions about the mean- 
ing of the body, mental and physical health, the 
nature of community, spirituality, and the end 
and goal of human life in God's creation. 
Poling TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

G-ETS 32-643 

The Psychology of Sin and Transformation 

in Feminist Theologies 

Exploration of the psychological concepts of 
motivation, self, gender, and change as these are 
expressed in the theological counterparts of sin 
and transformation in feminist theologies. Im- 
plications for the practice of ministry are con- 
sidered. 
Rector F 9-12 Fall 

MTS M-311 
Pastoral Counseling 

Introduction of basic concepts and models for 
effective pastoral counseling, including initial 
assessment, establishing counseling relation- 
ship, maintaining caring and helpful relation- 
ships, referrals, and techniques for various situ- 
ations. 
Ashby MW 8-9:50 Fall 

MTS M-349K 

Transformation through Care: Evangelism 

and Membership Care (Taught in Korean) 

Through basic understanding of evangelism and 
membership care in the local church, students 
will prepare an integrated program of evange- 
lism and new-member assimilation based on the 
Reformed faith. 
Han M 1-3:50 Fall 



NBTS CN301H 

Teorias de la personalidad en el contexto 

hispano 

Este curso es un estudio de varias teorias de la 
personalidad y su relacion al entendimiento 
cristiano de la persona. Tambien se estudiaran 
aquellos aspectos de la personalidad que 
determinan y afectan la conducta. 
Schipani F 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 



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Ministry Studies 

NBTS CTPC401 
Pastoral Theology 

An exploration of the integration of theology with 
the practice of pastoral care through the use of 
case studies presented by the participants. Prereq: 
foundational courses in Bible and theology. L P 
Justes W 9:30-12:10 Fall 

NBTS INPC301 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including the develop- 
ment of skills in integrating theology and the 
practice of ministry with an understanding of 
issues in interpersonal relationships. L 
Justes TTh 9:30-10:50 Fall 

NBTS PC403H 

Consejo Pre- y Neo-Marital 

Estudio de temas y dinamicas en la relacion de 
pareja previa al matrimonie, y en los primeros 
tiempos de la vida conyugal. 
Schipani F 9:30-12:10 Fall 

NPTS MNST5125 

Ministry to Substance Abusers 

Lecture, discussion, and guest presentations will 
develop a biblical, theological, and psychologi- 
cal basis for the ministry of the church to those 
struggling with substance abuse and various 
addictions. 2 hours. 

Jackson Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 M 6-10 p.m. 

TEDS PC 737 

Ethics and Issues in Counseling 

Basic tenets of the ethical standards of the pro- 
fessional counseling associations, including the 
National Association of Counseling and Devel- 
opment and the American Association of Mar- 
riage and Family Therapists. Ethical issues of 
counseling practices. 

Stark Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 



IV. Liturgy and Worship 

CTU BW465x 

Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

(For course description see New Testament III.) 
Perelmuter MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 



CTU MW475 
Worship Practicum I 

Practicum designed for priesthood candidates to 
develop competency in leadership of sacramen- 
tal rites, including initiation, weddings, wakes, 
and funerals. Emphasis on Eucharist. Open to 
students in their final year. Prereq: W 350, W 
450, and W 455. 
Ostdiek T 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU W350f 
Introduction to Liturgy 

Basic issues and elements of Christian liturgy 
with special attention given to the liturgical 
documents of the Roman Catholic church. Re- 
quired lab sessions on dates announced at the 
beginning of the quarter. 

Fragomeni MW 10-12:45 Fall 

Ostdiek M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU W450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

Study of origins and development of eucharistic lit- 
urgy and theology with particular emphasis on the 
eucharistic prayer. Theological reflection on its de- 
velopment will prepare for discussion of contempo- 
rary issues in eucharistic theology and practice. L 
Foley TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU W455f 

Becoming a Catholic Christian: The Rite of 

Christian Initiation of Adults 

Historical, theological, and pastoral reflection 
on the experience and sacraments of Christian 
initiation, with particular focus on the Rite of 
Christian Initiation of Adults as the norm for 
initiatory practice. 

Francis TTh 11:30-12:45 Fall 

Fragomeni MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU W537 
Liturgical Theology 

This seminar is designed to examine the litur- 
gical event as an expression and source of Chris- 
tian theology. 
Francis W 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

CTU W550 

The Liturgical Year 

This seminar will trace the development of li- 



64 



Ministry Studies 



turgical feasts and seasons and their theological 
implications. Historical studies will prepare both 
for reflection on the current shape of the liturgi- 
cal year and discussion of its celebration. L 
Foley W 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU W563 

Shaping Places for Worship 

Using a range of media and methods, this semi- 
nar will examine liturgical, spatial, artistic, and 
pastoral issues involved in shaping places for 
worship, with special attention to the process of 
building/renovating churches. 
Ostdiek W 8:30-11:15 Fall 

G-ETS 31-51 If 
Christian Public Worship 

The importance of worship in the life and work 
of the minister and the congregation. Increasing 
competence in the understanding, theology, plan- 
ning, and leadership of worship. L 

(A) Duck MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

(B)Duck M 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

+ T 1:30-3:20 



Brugh Jan. 5-16 

MF8-12 + TWTh 8-11 



Winter 



LSTC M-493 

The Word in Worship 

Nature of aurality, meditating the liturgy, pub- 
lic prayer in the assembly, pericopal systems and 
the church year, and the homily in the liturgy. 
Emphasis on cross-referencing and creatively 
using the symbols, images, and metaphors of 
church year cycles. 
Bangert MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 



M/L M314f 

Worship Theory and Liturgy in the Liberal 

Tradition 

Study of worship theory in terms of congrega- 
tional life and the uses of worship in varied con- 
texts and with different age cohorts. The arts 
and the meaning of components of worship will 
be considered. L 
Gibbons Jan. (1 week TBA) Winter 

M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required for January intensive 



NPTS THEO7202 

The Church, Liturgy, and Sacraments 

The study of worship, contextualized in 
ecclesiology, is the study of God's service to the 
church (word and sacrament) and the church's 
service to God (praise, prayer, proclamation, and 
ritual). 

Weborg Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 M 1:50-4:45 

S-WTS 09-504S 

Principles of Liturgical Worship 

A survey of the essentials of Christian worship, 
the nature of ritual and symbol, and the mean- 
ing of worship in the life of the Christian com- 
munity. 
Meyers WF 9-10:50 Fall 



V. Preaching and Communication 

CTS CM 305 

Preaching from an African American 
Perspective 

The genius of the black preaching tradition is 
its ability to celebrate the gospel. A look at this 
tradition's rootage in the "good news" and a 
search for ways celebration can enhance preach- 
ing of today's gospel. Students of all traditions 
welcome. 
Thomas Th 5-8 p.m. Fall 



CTU MW450f 

Introduction to Liturgical Preaching 

This practicum examines the homily as a litur- 
gical action within the Christian assembly. Par- 
ticipants consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural, 
and practical dynamics of preaching and effec- 
tive communication skills. L 
Fragomeni T 8:30-11:15 Fall 

Fragomeni T 1-3:45 Winter 



CTU MW458 

Preaching the Sunday Lectionary: Cycle C 

Considers the homily in the Sunday assembly. 
Participants will study the lectionary cycle, 
preach several homilies, and survey the entire 
cycle of readings. Prereq: MW 450 or equiv. L 
TBA T 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 



65 



Ministry Studies 



GETS 3 1-50 If 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

The growth of the sermon from text and idea 
through presentation and evaluation. Delivery 
of sermons by each student in class. The course 
may not be taken during a student's first year or 
its part-time equivalent. L 



(A) Chatfield 

(B) Chatfield 


TTh 6-7:50 p.m 
WF 9-10:50 


Fall 
Fall 


Chatfield 


Jan. 26-Mar. 20 
TTh 1:30-3:50 


Winter 


(A) Chatfield 

(B) Duck 


TTh 1:30-3:20 
WF 9-10:50 


Spring 
Spring 



NBTS MN382 
Principles of Preaching 

This introductory course in preaching is de- 
signed to acquaint the student with the basic 
knowledge and skills necessary for effective 
preaching. Special attention will be given to 
the exegesis of Scripture and sermon organi- 
zation. L 
Butler T 2:30-5:10 Fall 



NPTS MNST5109 
Human Communication 

Examines theories of communication as tools 
for understanding and improving skills in inter- 
personal and group settings. Dimensions of com- 
munication related to culture and gender are 
explored with special focus on listening skills. 
1 hour. 

Koptak Fall Semester, Quad B 

Oct. 20-Dec. 4 Th 1:50-3:40 



NPTS MNST 6220/BIBL 6220 
Biblical Preaching: The Book 
of Proverbs 

Practice in moving from biblical text to sermon 
with a focus on Proverbs. Issues related to 
preaching from the biblical genre represented 
will be discussed as students prepare and de- 
liver sermons. 2 hours. 

Koptak Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 Th 6-10 p.m. 



NPTS MNST 7310 
Advanced Proclamation 

Students will consider recent developments in 
the field of homiletics and prepare and deliver 
sermons using a variety of methods that may 
enhance their effectiveness in the local church. 
2 hours. 

Noren Fall Semester 

Aug. 25-Dec. 4 M 8-9:50 

TEDS H751 

Expository Preaching: Pastoral Epistles 

Focus on the faithful movement from the writ- 
ten Word to the spoken word, using Paul's pas- 
toral letters. Following lectures addressing is- 
sues critical to the success of this enterprise, 
concentration will be on hands-on 
hermeneutical/homiletical work. 
Bui I more Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 

VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-506 

Theological Education in the Parish 

Task of the pastor and educator as theological 
educators in the parish. Interplay of theology and 
teaching methods within the life and mission of 
the community of faith. 
Seymour/Dori Baker T 6— 9 p.m. Fall 

GETS 33-643 

Teaching Justice/Teaching Justly 

Teaching justice is not only a matter of content; 
it also requires that the processes of teaching be 
just. This class will consider both the "hidden" 
curriculum of classes and institutions and re- 
sources for teaching about justice issues. 
Morris Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 

LSTC M-360 

Educational Ministry: Teaching and Learning 

Students will study the theological and devel- 
opmental foundations of Christian education and 
put them into practice by teaching at four age 
levels, using four different teaching-learning 
models. Part of the Teaching Parish experience. 

(A) Conrad MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

(B) Conrad Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 



66 



Ministry Studies 



M/L M309 

Formative Figures in Practical Theology 

and Religious Education 

(For course description see M/L TS305 in Theo- 
logical Studies III.) 
Harlow TBA Fall 

M/L M415f 

Religious Education Curriculum 

Explores theoretical foundations for curriculum 
development and instruction in religious edu- 
cation settings. Attention to probing critical is- 
sues, articulating principles for evaluation, and 
exploring methods appropriate for various pur- 
poses and contexts. 

Harlow Jan. (1 week TBA) M-F 9-5 Winter 
Fall registration required for January intensive 

MTS M-401 

The Pastor as Educator 

A pastor's role as educational leader represents 
an important theological, educational, spiritual, 
and ecclesiological approach to ministry. Course 
will identify and give opportunities for practice 
of skills essential to the role of educator. 
Smith M 9-11:50 Fall 

NBTS ED321H 

Jesus, el Maestro 

Estudio del ministerio educativo de Jesus, segun 
los cuatro Evangelios, y su pertinencia para hoy. 
La doble meta del curso es apreciar el significado 
del ministerio de Jesus como discipulador y 
mejorar asi nuestraensefianza a la luz de tal modelo. 
Schipani Th 6:30-9:10 p.m. Fall 

NBTS ED 402 

Educational Ministry with Children 

An exploration of opportunities and age-appro- 
priate strategies for teaching and learning with 
children, with special attention to crucial issues 
and crisis points. 
McGinnis-Gillispie W 2:30-5:10 Fall 

NPTS CEDF5101 

History and Theology of Christian Educa- 
tion and Formation 

Religious education as presented in the Old and 
New Testaments and developed throughout the 
history of the church will be surveyed. Particu- 



lar attention paid to the impact of various the- 
ologies on Christian education in the last hun- 
dred years. 1 hour. 

Bramer Fall Semester, Quad B 

Oct. 20-Dec. 4 Th 1-3:05 

NPTS CEDF5104 
Human Development 

The processes of human development and char- 
acteristics of the various stages in the physical, 
intellectual, psychosocial, moral, and spiritual 
dimensions will be outlined. Some applications 
to Christian education and ministry will be ex- 
plored. 1 hour. 

TBA Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 M 11-12:50 

NPTS CEDF6211 

Philosophy of Children's Ministry 

A framework for ministry to and with children 
will be developed by examining biblical foun- 
dations, current needs, and effective models of 
ministry. (First in a series of five.) 1 hour. 
TBA Fall Semester, Quad A 

2 Saturdays Sept. 20, Oct. 4 TBA 

NPTS CEDF6213 

Christian Formation of Children 

Exploration of formal and informal experiences 
and instruction for children that will lead to their 
meaningful participation in the life of the home 
and congregation. Includes spiritual disciplines 
like worship, stewardship, witness, and service. 
1 hour. 

TBA Fall Semester, Quad B 

2 Saturdays Nov. 8, 22 TBA 

NPTS CEDF6216 
Philosophy of Youth Ministry 

A framework for ministry to and with youth will 
be developed by examining Biblical foundations, 
current needs, and effective models of ministry. 
(First in a series of five.) 1 hour. 
TBA Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 T 6:20-8:10 p.m. 



NPTS CEDF6217 

Programming and Resources in Youth Ministry 

Designing programs, service education, retreats, 



67 



Ministry Studies 

leadership development, and support systems 
for youth as well as surveying current resources 
for youth ministry will be the concerns of this 
course. 1 hour. 

TBA Fall Semester, Quad B 

Oct. 20-Dec. 4 T 6:20-8:10 p.m. 

NPTS CEDF7200 

Christian Education and Formation in the 

Church 

This course will include perspectives, principles, 
methods, and programs of Christian education 
and formation in the local church, with atten- 
tion to teaching skills, learning processes, hu- 
man stages of development, and the role of the 
pastor. 2 hours. 

Bramer Fall Semester, Quad A 

Aug. 25-Oct. 13 TTh 3:15-5:05 

TEDS CE500 

Educational Ministry of the Church 

Introduction to local church administration and 
teaching, focusing on the aims, principles, or- 
ganization, and development of a local church 
educational program; and on the aims, methods, 
media, and evaluation of the teaching process. 
Downs Fall Semester 

Sept. 1-Dec. 19 TBA 



VII. Polity and Canon Law 

CTU MW421f 
Church and Structure 

An introductory course treating the nature, role, 
and history of canon law; church structures; 
Eastern rites; ministries and holy orders; cleri- 
cal discipline; the teaching office; acts of 
nonsacramental worship; sacred places and 
times; general norms. 

TBA MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

TBA MW 1-2:15 Spring 

S-WTS 13-505S 
Canon Law 

Introduction to the history of Christian canoni- 
cal legislation, with particular emphasis on the 
canonical structures of the Episcopal Church, 
and to the use of canon law in pastoral ministry. 
One-half unit. 
Amadio W 6:30-8:50 p.m. Fall 



68 



Old Testament 



WINTER 1998 

(Includes Spring Semester and 
Spring Quad A courses at NPTS and TEDS) 

Biblical Studies 

LSTC B-455 

Preparing Your First Sermons 

Biblical exegesis and practical preaching helps 
for Pentecost "C" lectionary texts, designed for 
seniors and others preparing for their first 
months in a parish. Student sermons will focus 
on texts from Mark, Ephesians, Hebrews, and 
the Old Testament. 
Krentz TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

LSTC M-429x 

The Bible and Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Billman/Rossing W 2:30-5:30 Winter 

MTS B/M-426 
Teaching the Bible 

(For course description see MTS M/B-426 in 

Ministry Studies VI.) 

Caldwell/Tanzer MW 2-3:50 Winter 



LSTC B-310w 

Pentateuch and Historical Books 

(Distance learning course; for course descrip- 
tion see Fall.) 

Klein Winter-Spring 

F 6-9 p.m. +S 9-12 

Feb. 13-14, Mar. 13-14, April 10-11, 

May 8—9, June 12-13 (Chicago- Appleton) 

LSTC B-311 

Old Testament Methods of Study 

Introduces students to the methods of interpret- 
ing Old Testament texts, using the Hebrew lan- 
guage. Special attention will be given to the 
Psalms and wisdom literature. 
Fuerst MTh 10:45-12 Winter 

Michel W 6-9 p. m Winter 

NPTS BIBL5149 

Old Testament Faith: Writings 

A survey of the literature and message of the 
third section of the Hebrew canon, the Writings. 
The course places special emphasis on Israel's 
traditions of worship and wisdom and their im- 
plications for contemporary church life. 2 hours. 
Koptak Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April30 M 6: 15-8: 1 5 p.m. 



Old Testament 

I. Introductory 

CTS CH302 

People and Faith of Israel II 

An introduction to the historical, literary, and 
theological interpretation of the prophetic, po- 
etic, and wisdom texts of the Hebrew Scriptures. 
Stone T 9-12 Winter 



CTU B300w 

Introduction to the Old Testament 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Okoye T 7-9:45 p.m. 



G-ETS 1 1-511 w 

Old Testament Interpretation 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Duncan Jan. 26-Mar. 20 

MW 5:30-7:30 p.m. 



Winter 



Winter 



NPTS BIBL6121 
Old Testament Faith II 

An introduction to the Hebrew Prophets with 
particular attention to their rhetorical forms and 
main themes. The course incorporates an intro- 
duction to Hebrew poetry and the principles for 
properly interpreting it. 

Hubbard Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-Apnl30 TTh 10:30-11:25 

TEDS OT769 
Syriac 

Introduction to Syriac grammar with limited read- 
ing of the Peshitta text of the New Testament. 
Magary Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 

II. Canonical Corpus 

CTU B410 
Early Prophecy 

A study of eighth-century prophecy in Israel, 



69 



Old Testament 



particularly Amos and Hosea. A transcultural 
approach will give attention to form and con- 
tent as well as to the transfer of meaning to 
today's context. 
Okoye MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU B425 

Wisdom Literature 

A study of the wisdom theology with its empha- 
sis on human behavior. Primary focus will be 
on the themes of creation, suffering, birth and 
death, retribution, and immortality as found 
within the wisdom literature. Prereq: B 300 or 
equiv. 
Bergant MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

G-ETS 11 -60 IB 
Pentateuch: Joseph 

Advanced study of literary units and theologi- 
cal themes. Emphasis on analytical and synthetic 
interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511. L 
Roth Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

MW 5:30-7:30 p.m. 

MTS B-405 
Yahwist Revolution 

A study of Israel's antecedents, birth as a people, 
early life as a nation, focusing on Genesis- 1 
Samuel. Attention to appropriate critical meth- 
ods for content and theology of Israel's epic tra- 
dition, law, and oldest poetry. 
Hiebert MW 10-11:50 Winter 

NBTS OT302 

The Former Prophets 

An introduction to the critical, historical, and 
theological study of the books of Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, and Kings. Special attention will be 
given to the historical, political, religious, and 
social events that shaped Israelite society. L 
Mariottini T 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 

NBTS OT305H 

Los profetas menores 

Esta clase es una introduction a los doce profetas 
menores. La clase dara atencion especial a la 
situation hist6rica, social, politica, y religiosa 
del ministerio de los doce profetas menores. 
Mariottini Th 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 



S-WTS 01-606S 

Studies in Israelite Wisdom and Hymnody: 

The Psalms of Israel 

An examination of the Psalm categories, of their 
possible settings and uses, and of the Old Tes- 
tament traditions seen in the Psalms; consider- 
ation of the use of the Psalms in public worship 
and private devotions. 
Deeley TTh 9-10:50 Winter 

HI. Topics in Old Testament 

CTS CH413 

Sex, Gender, and Kinship in the Hebrew 

Bible 

An interdisciplinary study of the relations among 
sex, gender, and kinship in the Hebrew Bible. 
Attention to the sociohistorical matrix of the 
texts and to contemporary hermeneutical issues. 
Stone W 9-12 Winter 

CTU B506 
Messianic Expectations 

A seminar on messianism as it developed in 
ancient Israel and early Judaism in light of the 
Christian confession of Jesus as the Messiah. L 
Hoppe Th 10-12:45 Winter 

GETS 11/12-630 

The Old Testament and the Gospels 

Exploration of NT as "haggadic" recreations of 
narrative patterns and sections of Hebrew Scrip- 
tures. Introduction to Jewish ways of preserv- 
ing Holy Writ in ethics and theology; study of 
one Gospel. Prereq: foundational course in OT 
or NT. One-half unit. 

Roth Jan. 5-16 Winter 

MF 8-12 + TWTh 8-11 

LSTC B-502 

New Looks at Biblical Exegesis 

The course will feature extensive engagement 
with problems of Old Testament theology and 
their connection with theological issues today. 
Fuerst W 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

LSTC B-620 

Graduate Biblical Seminar I: The 

Pentateuch 

An ongoing seminar on the Pentateuch materi- 



70 



New Testament 



als. Theme for 1998: the Priestly document in 
the Pentateuch. (For post-M.Div. students. Ad- 
mission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Klein M 12:30-3:45 Winter 

TEDS OT845A-94 

Synoptic Passages in Old Testament 

Theology 

This course seeks to translate many of the syn- 
optic parallels from the Old Testament as a 
means of attempting to isolate and identify tex- 
tual and syntactic clues that signify and convey 
theological intentionality on the part of the bib- 
lical writers. 

Beitzel/Magary Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 

IV. Hebrew Language 

CTU B325 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I 

This is the first part of a two-quarter course 
which studies the grammar and vocabulary of 
biblical Hebrew in order to prepare students to 
work with the Hebrew text. 
Hoppe MTWTh 3:45-4:45 Winter 

G-ETS 11-641 
Elementary Hebrew I 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 
(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 
prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. Two-unit 
course; credit for 11-641 upon satisfactory 
completion of 11-642. 

Bird Jan. 5-23 Winter 

TWThF 8:30-10:30 + TWTh 2-4:30 

G-ETS 11-642 
Elementary Hebrew II 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 
(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 
prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. Course contin- 
ues and completes sequence begun in 1 1-641. 
Bird Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

MTTh 3:30-5:10 

LSTC B-301 
Biblical Hebrew II 

A continuation of Biblical Hebrew I taught in Fall. 
Michel MW 1-2:15 Winter 



MTS B-430 

Hebrew HI: The Book of Genesis 

A reading of selected sections of book of Gen- 
esis with attention to the grammar, syntax, and 
style of Pentateuchal narrative. Literary, histori- 
cal, and theological aspects of the exegesis of 
Genesis will be examined. Prereq: B-32 1/322 
and B-300 or equiv. 
Hiebert MW 2-3:50 Winter 

NPTS BIBL6101 
Beginning Hebrew II 

Follow-up study of the Hebrew verbal system 
with special emphasis on the significance of 
grammar for interpretation. The course incor- 
porates a preliminary introduction to Hebrew 
syntax through study of biblical texts. Prereq: 
BIBL6100. 

Bruckner Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April 30 TTh 8-9:20 

NPTS BIBL6103 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description see Fall NPTS BIBL 
6102.) 

Koptak Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April 30 TBA 

S-WTS 01-521GS 
Elementary Biblical Hebrew I 

Will enable students to approach the Hebrew 
Bible in its own language with some basic con- 
fidence and competence. Includes an introduc- 
tion to the elements of grammar and syntax. 
Prereq: Introduction to Biblical Languages and 
Exegesis. 
TBA MTWTh 4-4:50 Winter 



New Testament 

I. Introductory 

CTS CH321 
Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the origin, interrelationship, and in- 
tent of the three synoptic Gospels. Special at- 
tention is given to the form and function of a 
gospel. 
TBA TBA Winter 



71 



New Testament 

CTU B305w 

New Testament Introduction 

The New Testament writings in their historical, 
cultural, religous, and social context. Introduc- 
tion to methodological tools employed in New 
Testament research and to the diverse theolo- 
gies that comprise the New Testament witness 
to Jesus of Nazareth. 

Osiek MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

Reid T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 12-501w 

New Testament Interpretation: Matthew- 
Acts 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Vena Jan. 26— Mar. 20 Winter 

W 9-10:50 + F 9-11:50 

G-ETS 12-502w 

New Testament Interpretation: Romans- 
Revelation 

Theory and practice of exegesis of selected epis- 
tolary texts, with attention to the history of early 
Christianity. Exploration of the theology of Paul, 
Acts, and late New Testament writings. Lectures 
and exegetical section meetings. L 
Yeo Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 8:30-10:50 
Yeo T 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC B-335 

New Testament Methods of Study 

Introduction to the tools and methods for inter- 
preting the New Testament with practice in so- 
cial analysis, historical investigation, word stud- 
ies, literary criticism, and liberation exegesis. 
Greek prerequisite for LSTC M.Div. students. 
Krentz TTh 2:30-4:30 Winter 

Rossing MTh 1-3 Winter 

NPTS BIBL 5151s 

Interpreting the New Testament II 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Belleville Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April30 M 1:50-4:45 

II. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B432 

The Gospel According to Mark 

A study of the Gospel of Mark with attention to 



its structure, major themes, and key theological 
motifs, especially the link between the Passion 
of Jesus and Christian discipleship. Prereq: B 
305 or equiv. 
Osiek W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

GETS 12-610 

The Revelation to John 

Analysis of form, content, and function, in light 
of the genre of the book. Exploration of mean- 
ing on the basis of interaction of text with his- 
torical setting and guidance in differentiating 
appropriate from inappropriate use. Prereq: 12- 
502 or equiv. L 
Hansen TTh 8:30-10:50 Winter 

LSTC B-650 

Graduate Biblical Seminar IV: The Gospel 

of John 

An exegetical course focusing on the theology, 
stylistic features, and rhetoric of John's narra- 
tive. M.Div. students with Greek are encour- 
aged to register. (For post-M.Div. students; ad- 
mission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Rhoads T 1-4:30 Winter 

MTS B-402 

The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the Gospel in its sociohistorical and 
literary contexts. Emphasis on ways Matthew 
deals with Hebrew Scripture and earlier Chris- 
tian traditions in the literary composition of the 
Gospel and its theological and hermeneutical 
implications. 
Cortes-Fuentes TTh 10-11:50 Winter 

MTS B-403 
Epistles of Paul 

Introduction to the seven Pauline letters most 
scholars agree are authentic to Paul, and to prob- 
lems, methods, resources of understanding Paul, 
his letters, and his theology. Prereq: B-300. 
Mitchell MW 8-9:50 Winter 

NBTS NT308H 

Lectura critica de Colosenses y Efesios 

Reconstruccion de los distintos contextos 
historicos y teol6gicos de cada carta, decisivos 
para entender el cristianismo neotestamentario, 
para generar asi una predication y labor pasto- 



72 



New Testament 



ral bien informadas y pertinentes al contexto 

hispano contemporaneo. 

Weiss Jan 5-9 M-F 9-4:30 Winter 

NPTS BIBL6254 

The Parables of Jesus 

An analysis of the individual parables of Jesus 
will draw on both ancient and modern literary 
discussions in order to understand his teaching. 
Explicit attention will be given to preaching from 
the parables. 2 hours. 

Snodgrass Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 TTh 3:15-5:05 



S-WTS 02-603S 
The Fourth Gospel 

The study of the Gospel of John in the context 

of its historical environment. 

Pervo TTh 3-4:50 Winter 



TEDS NT 706 
Romans 

Stress on theology of Paul, with consideration 
of distinctive emphases of the epistle: Paul's 
teaching on Judaism, salvation history, the power 
of sin, righteousness, the Holy Spirit, and the 
future of Israel. Prereq: reading knowledge of 
Greek. 

Moo Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 



III. Topics in New Testament 

CTU B532 

Seminar: The Passion Narratives 

A comparative study of the Passion narratives 
of the four Gospels, demonstrating various ap- 
proaches to biblical interpretation. 
Senior W 10-12:45 Winter 



MS BI358 

New Testament Miracles (G) (SG) 

The course examines the questions that modern 
culture has about the phenomena of miracles and 
then focuses on the form, function, and place of 
the stories of the Gospel narratives. L 
Lodge MTh 2:40-4 Winter 

NBTS BL471H 

Exegesis biblica: Hebreos 

Estudio de Hebreos dando atencion especial a 
los metodos, las herramientas, y los recursos 
exegeticos. Se pondra atencion al contexto 
historico, literario y social. Ademas habra 
enfoque sobre el mensaje y su pertinencia en la 
iglesia actual. 
Horning Th 2:30-5:10 Winter 

NPTS BIBL6225 

Apocalyptic Literature 

Old Testament, early Jewish, and New Testa- 
ment apocalyptic eschatology is studied in this 
seminar with the life of the church and contem- 
porary interpretations of prophecy always in 
view. 2 hours. 

Phelan Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 M 6-10 p.m. 

TEDS NT 761 

History of New Testament Interpretation 

Survey of history of criticism of New Testament 
from late 18th century to present. Particular 
emphasis placed on development of critical 
methodologies, relationships between critical 
approaches and worldview, and evangelical re- 
sponses to key movements. 
Yarbrough Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 



G-ETS 12-606 

The Parables of Jesus 

Contemporary parable research as a way of dis- 
covering the meaning of the parables in the mes- 
sage of the early church and in the teaching of 
Jesus. Attention to form and Jewish background 
of the parables. Prereq: 12-501. 
Stegner Jan. 5-18 Winter 

MF 8-12 + TWTh 8-11 



IV. New Testament Greek 

CTU B321 
Biblical Greek II 

A continuation of B 320, introduction to the 
grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Tes- 
tament. Students will begin to read portions of 
the New Testament text in Greek with intro- 
ductory attention to exegesis. 
Osiek MTWTh 8:30-9:30 Winter 



73 



New Testament 



GETS 12-642 
Elementary Greek II 

Essential forms and principles of New Testa- 
ment Greek. Course completes sequence begun 
in 12-641. 

Stegner Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

MTTh 3:30-5: JO 

LSTC B-308 
Biblical Greek II 

A continuation of Biblical Greek I. Completion 
of Greek grammar. Extensive reading in New 
Testament texts. 
Holloway MTh 10:45-12 Winter 



NPTS BIBL5113 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description see Fall NPTS BIBL 
5112.) 

Belleville Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April 30 TBA 

S-WTS 02-52 1GS 
Elementary Greek 

An introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and 
translation of the Greek language as it is em- 
ployed in the New Testament and early Chris- 
tian texts. Prereq: Introduction to Biblical Lan- 
guages and Exegesis. 
TBA MTWTh 4-4:50 Winter 



LSTC B-309w 

Greek Readings: The Lectionary Lessons 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Choi M 12-12:50 Winter 

MTS B-324 

Introduction to Greek Exegesis I 

The first part of a nondivisible two-quarter se- 
quence. An introduction to the principles of 
Greek grammar and vocabulary and to exegeti- 
cal resources for studying the New Testament 
in its original language. Credit only upon 
completion of B-325. 

Tamer MTh 10-1 1:50 Winter 

TBA TF 10-11:50 Winter 

NBTS BL351L 

New Testament Greek II 

This course, together with BL 350L, New Tes- 
tament Greek I, is a basic introduction to the 
grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Tes- 
tament. Skills for translation are developed. 
Taught bilingually. 
Horning TTh 1-2:20 Winter 

NPTS BIBL 5110 

Beginning New Testament Greek II 

Follow-up study of the rudiments of biblical 
Greek. The focus continues to be on basic gram- 
mar, vocabulary, and the development of read- 
ing skills. 

Katter Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April 30 MWF 1-2:15 



Historical Studies 

I. Introductory 

CTS CH345 

History of Christian Thought II 

From the Reformation through the 20th century. 
A survey of significant theological movements, 
with attention to their social context. (This 
course may be elected independently of History 
of Christian Thought I.) 
TBA TBA Winter 

CTU H300 

History of Early Christianity 

The Christian movement to Chalcedon. Chris- 
tian self-identification vis-a-vis the non- 
Christian world, developing institutional church 
structures and practice, and theological and doc- 
trinal developments. 
Madigan TTh 10-1 1:15 Winter 

GETS 13-501w 
History of Christianity I 

(For course description see Fall.) 
TBA Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 8:30-10:50 

GETS 13-502w 
History of Christianity II 

Major issues, ideas, events, and persons in the 
history of the church from the 1 1th century through 
the 17th century; emphasis on late medieval 



74 



Historical Studies 



Christianity and origins of Protestantism. L 
Stein Jan. 5-16 Winter 

MF8-12 + TWTh 8-11 
TBA Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC H-330 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and modern 
church history outside America, designed to 
show in broad perspective the movements which 
have shaped world Christianity in our time. Lec- 
tures and discussion of selected source readings. 
Juris son MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

Killinger T 6-9 p.m. Winter 

meets at ELCA, 8765 W. Higgins Rd. 

MTS H-418 

The Church of Antiquity 

Study of emergence of Christian church in its 
first millennium with primary emphasis on pe- 
riod before Gregory I. Close attention to devel- 
opment of major dogmatic decisions of the Chris- 
tian community within social and institutional 
structures of this era. 
TBA Th 1-3:50 Winter 

NBTS CH302 

Reformation and Modern Christianity 

An examination of the major issues and devel- 
opments in Christian life and thought from the 
16th century to the present. 
Weber T 2:30-5:10 Winter 



II. History of Particular Traditions 

CTU CD465x 

Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church 

(For course description see World Mission Stud- 
ies.) 
Riebe-Estrella M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU CH424 

Sub-Saharan African History 

A study will be made of Roman Catholic Church 
"implantation" and African socioreligious re- 
sponse contributing to the formation of Chris- 
tian identity in sub-Saharan Africa, from 1860 
to the present. 
Perry TTh 1-2:15 Winter 



CTU DC576w 

Black Theology in Dialogue 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Phelps T 7-9:45 p.m. 



Winter 



CTU H401 
Patristics 

A study of the theological perspectives of major 
writers of the early church. Prereq: H 300, H 
302, or CH 325 or equiv. 
Madigan MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU HD517 

Structures of Reform: Gregory VII, 

Lateran, Trent, and Vatican II 

Attempt to discern paradigms for ecclesial re- 
form in 16th- and 17th-century Roman Catholic 
theological movements and schools of spiritual- 
ity to show how these structures of reform illumi- 
nate contemporary issues in Roman Catholicism. 
Linnan M 1-3:45 Winter 

G-ETS 13-674 

History of the Evangelical Movement 

Course examines multiple streams of Christian 
tradition that constitute what historians have 
deemed Protestant Evangelicalism and focuses es- 
pecially on the impact the evangelical tradition has 
on the church and public life in the U.S. today. 
B. Smith Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

F 8:30-12 

MTS H-422 

Reformation in Spanish-Speaking Lands 

Survey of Spanish Reformation thought. Atten- 
tion to Juan de Valdes, Francisco de Enzinas, 
Juan Perez Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, and 
Cipriano de Valera. 
Rodriguez- Diaz T 9-11:50 Winter 

NPTS HIST 7300 

History and Theology of the Covenant 

Church 

Study of the evangelical and pietistic tradition 
within which the Evangelical Covenant Church 
stands. Attention to Reformation and to historic and 
theological development of Pietism in Sweden 
and North America in 19th and 20th centuries. 
Anderson Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April30 M 1:50-4:45 




75 



Historical Studies 

III. History — Individuals 

G-ETS 13-608 

Theology of Martin Luther 

Introduction to Luther's life and theological con- 
tribution through study of his sermons, treatises, 
and letters. Prereq: 13-501, 502, 503, or equiv. 
L 
Stein 



Jan. 26-Mar. 20 
W 9-10:50 + F 9-11:50 



Winter 



MTS H-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

Study of development of Calvin's thought in 
various editions of the Institutes. A look at his 
associations with other reformers to discern con- 
tours of his theology and aspects of continuity/ 
differences between him and later forms of Cal- 
vinism. 
Sawyer M 1-3:50 Winter 



IV. American Church History 

LSTC H-350B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A course focusing on Lutheranism in the United 

States and especially on the problem of unity 

and polarization among the various Lutheran 

traditions. The historical development is viewed 

against the broad background of Christianity in 

America. 

Jiirisson T 2:30-5:30 Winter 

MS HI398 
Chicago Catholicism 

A study of the Chicago Catholic Church lead- 
ers, parishes, and institutions, as well as the 
people from many different nations who have 
contributed to its rich diversity. 
Sorvillo TBA Winter 



V. Topics in Church History 

LSTC H-460 

A History of the Relationships between Art 

and Religion 

An overview of the history of religious expres- 
sion in visual art, discussing a wide range of 
religious beliefs but focusing on Christianity 



(early church to present). Discussion of the ef- 
fect historical models have on worship space and 
practice. 

Caemmerer Feb. 16-Mar. 12 Winter 

MTTh 7-9:50 p.m. 

S-WTS 03-504S 

The Modern Church (1648-) 

A survey of the life and thought of Catholic, 
Protestant, and Orthodox churches from the 1 7th 
century on, with special attention to the mis- 
sionary and ecumenical movements and to the 
new context of a pluralistic society. 
Harrold WF 9-10:50 Winter 



Theological Studies 

I. Introductory and Foundational 

CTS CH345x 

History of Christian Thought II 

(For course description see Historical Studies I.) 
TBA TBA Winter 



GETS 21-501w 
Systematic Theology I 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Will Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

T 6-9:30 p.m. 

G-ETS 21-502w 
Systematic Theology II 

Christian understanding of Jesus the Christ, sal- 
vation, the Holy Spirit, church, ministry, and 
sacraments. Prereq: 21-501 or equiv. 
Young Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

MW 5:30-7:30 p.m. 
Will TTh 3:30-5:20 Spring 

LSTC T-312 
Christian Theology II 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence see LSTC T-31 1, Christian Theology I 
(Fall). The second course in the sequence deals 
with the human condition (including sin and 
evil) and the person and work of Christ. 
Hefner T 6-9:30 p.m. Winter 

Westhelle MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 



76 



MTS T-300w 

Introduction to Christian Theology 

Introduction to contents, methods, and resources 
of coherent and responsible Christian thinking. 
Attention to understanding and interpreting ba- 
sic Christian doctrines. 

Case-Winters/Chun MW 8-9:50 Winter 

Parker /Rivera-Rodriguez Spring 

TTh 6-1 7 :50 p.m. 

NBTS IN 303 
Research Methodology 

An introduction to the variety of methodologies 
for doing research in areas of theological study. 
Mainelli W 9-12:30 Winter 

NBTS TH302 

Problems in Faith and Theology 

This course introduces the student to theologi- 
cal construction, engagement with the histori- 
cal and traditional sources of theology, and the 
practice of ministry. 
Sharp TBA, intensive Winter 

NBTS TH302H 

Teologia contextual: Una perspectiva 
praxeologica 

Analisis de los mas importantes acercamientos 
metodologicos en teologia (protestante clasico, 
liberal, neoortodoxo, politico, catolico clasico, 
liberation, carismatico) al articular la fe. 
Mottesi TBA, intensive Winter 

NBTS TH401 

God, Humanity, and Sin 

A study of the doctrine of God (the divine na- 
ture, attributes, triune relationship, and work of 
creation) and the doctrine of humanity (human 
nature, sin, destiny) to which is appended the 
doctrine of angels. 
Grenz Jan. 13-17 9-4 Winter 



S-WTS 05-510S 
Systematic Theology 

A historical and systematic study of basic Chris- 
tian doctrine as it has been understood within 
the Anglican tradition; attention to the develop- 
ment of a theological methodology for pastoral 
and homiletical ministry. 
Griffiss TTh 1-2:50 Winter 



Theological Studies 

II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

CTS TEC 504 

Augustine, Niebuhr, and Malcolm X 

We will review the ideas of these three highly 
influential thinkers about the nature of sin in 
human existence and those qualities of human 
beings requiring redemption, giving special at- 
tention to the theme of sin as pride and sensual- 
ity. 
Terrell M 9-12 Winter 

CTS TEC 531a 

Paul Tillich on Theology, Ethics, and the 

Human Sciences 

An advanced seminar on the thought of Paul 

Tillich. 

Moore M 9-12 Winter 

CTU D444 

Priesthood in the Roman Catholic Tradi- 
tion 

A study of the origins of ordained ministry in 
the early church, its gradual transformation as 
the church becomes a political power, its refor- 
mation in the 16th century, its image from the 
17th to the 20th century, and its renewal at 
Vatican Council II. 
Bevans TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU DCS575x 
Black Spirituality 

(For course description see Ministry Studies II.) 
Phelps MW 10-11:15 Winter 

LSTC T-436/NPTS THEO-174 
Studies in Bonhoeffer 

An intensive study/reflection on three texts from 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer: The Cost of Discipleship, 
Life Together, and Letters and Papers from 
Prison. Newly translated and updated versions 
of the texts will be used, as available. 
Bliese/F. B. Nelson W 6-9 p.m. Winter 

meets at ELCA, 8765 W. Higgins Rd. 

LSTC T-461H 

La fe que confesamos 

Este curso presentara de manera introductoria 
un examen de aquellos pronunciamientos de fe 
que, al remontarse a los origenes de la tradition 



77 



Theological Studies 

cristiana y continuar con su vitalidad en el 
presente, ayudan a entender el caracter 
confesante de la fe. 
Rodriguez T 1-4 Winter 

M/L TS336 

Theologies of the Liberal Churches 

Course aims to develop understanding of basic 
currents of thought in liberal churches and fel- 
lowships, with a focus on minister's role as theo- 
logian, facilitator of theological discourse, and 
leader in church's effort to build transformative 
ministry. 
Evison et al. 



TBA 



Winter 



MTS T-402 

The Reformed Tradition 

This course explores the history and theol- 
ogy of the Reformed tradition with a view to 
understanding its origins and development 
and its contemporary manifestations and rel- 
evance. 
Case-Winters T 2-4:50 Winter 

NBTS TH432 

Theological Concepts in the Literature of 

African American Experience 

This course seeks to identify African American 
dimensions of certain theological concepts com- 
municated through the medium of African 
American literature. L 
Butler Th 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 

S-WTS 05-655S 

The Cappadocians and Friends 

This course will study the great fourth-century 
Eastern church fathers: St. Basil the Great, St. 
Gregory the Theologian, and St. Gregory of 
Nyssa, along with the works of some of their 
contemporaries, such as St. Athanasius and St. 
John Chrysostom. 
The odor op oul os W 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 

TEDS PR 761 

Philosopher of Religion: Kierkegaard 

An in-depth consideration of the philosophy of 
Kierkegaard. 

J. Feinberg Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 



III. Topics in Theology 

CTS TEC 401 
Creation and Fall 

What can theology contribute to the human sci- 
ences regarding an understanding of the basic 
character of human existence? Study of funda- 
mental themes of a theological anthropology: 
creatureliness. the image of God, the fall, and 
original or universal sin. 
Jennings T 2-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 496 
Good and Evil 

Exploration of contemporary struggles with is- 
sue of violence in revolutionary situations, in 
American peace movement, in women's move- 
ment, and in the Third World. Special reference 
to use of political violence in struggle for lib- 
eration. 
Thistlethwaite W 9-12 Winter 

CTS TEC 605 

20th-century Theology 

Seminar for advanced degree students covering 
significant developments in theology in the 20th 
century. Focus on the emergence of new voices 
and the theological precedents for them. Per- 
mission required for non-CTS students. L 
Jennings Th 9-12 Winter 

CTU D430w 

Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hayes MW 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU D440 
Christology 

A study of the foundational questions of 
Christology in the light of the critical, historical 
study of the Scripture and the theological tradition. 
Hayes TTh 10-11:15 Winter 



CTU D445 

Theology of the Church and Its Ministry 

A theology of the church and its ministry in the 
light of their historical development from semi- 
nal beginnings in the apostolic age to various 
syntheses offered by post-Vatican II theologians. 
Linnan TTh 10-12:45 Winter 



78 



Theological Studies 



CTU D568 

Womanist Theology in Dialogue 

Study of how the integral dynamics of sexism, 
racism, and classism influence biblical and theo- 
logical understandings and interpretations of the 
major themes in systematic theology in the work 
of womanist, feminist, mujerista, and Asian fe- 
male theologians. 
Phelps T 7-9;45 p.m. Winter 

CTU DC 441 

Christology and Cultures 

A study of how the confession of Jesus Christ 
interacts with cultural processes. Special atten- 
tion is given to the New Testament and Patristic 
periods and also to contemporary movements in 
the world church today. 
Schreiter T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU DC 448 

Marian Theology, Symbols, and Inculturation 

Faith can be expressed only in the symbols of 
differing ages and cultures. Mary of the Gos- 
pels and tradition must be understood in our situ- 
ation. This course studies traditional and present 
symbols of the faithful. 
Brennan TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU DC 610 

Theological Anthropology: Cross-Cultural 

Perspective 

A seminar exploring the challenges to classical 
themes in theological anthropology raised by the 
variety of cultures in the world church. 
Schreiter Th 10-12:45 Winter 



LSTC T-456 

The Epic of Creation: Scientific and 

Religious Perspectives on Our Origins 

The scientific story of the origin and evolution 
of the universe, life, and humans; ancient Near 
Eastern and Greco-Roman concepts of creation; 
creation stories and themes from the Old and 
New Testaments and theological interpretations 
of the stories. 
Gilbert M 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

LSTC T-549 

Evil and the Human Condition 

A discussion of both the relationship between 



sin and evil and the classical problems of 
theodicy. An overview situates the debate since 
biblical times, including naturalistic and de- 
monic explanations. Contemporary theological 
positions examined. 
Westhelle M 1-4 Winter 



LSTC T-603 

Graduate Theological Seminar: Concepts 

and Methods 

For graduate students in Christian theology. The 
emphasis is on methodology, introducing basic 
concepts and issues that will help students clarify 
their own methodological styles. P 
Hefner T 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

MS SY317 

Christology in a Pluralistic Age 

The purpose of this course is to study contem- 
porary Christian attitudes toward the signifi- 
cance of Jesus Christ in the encounter with other 
world religions and to reflect upon relationship 
between interreligious dialogue and Christology. 
Lefebure MTh 2:40-4 Winter 

MS SY491 

Christian Faith in Some Great Literature 

In this course, literary works will be read in or- 
der to show how true humanism and true Chris- 
tianity are related. They will be interpreted in 
light of some New Testament passages. 
van Beeck TF 9: 55-11:15 Winter 



MTS T-415 

Between Hospitality and Hostility: Theo- 
logical Issues of Immigration 

Course reviews economic, political, and cultural 

debate on immigration in the U.S. with focus 

on Hispanic immigration; explores and assesses 

responses of Christian theologians and churches, 

including representatives from ethnic minority 

communities. 

Rivera-Rodriguez W 2-4:50 Winter 



NETS URTH405 

Toward a Theology of Urban Ministry 

Students in this seminar will read and ana- 
lyze recent efforts to articulate a theology for 



79 



Theological Studies 

urban ministry or confront basic theological 
issues raised by the urban environment. 
Dayton W 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 

NPTS THEO7350 
Doctrinal Topic 

Each year a doctrine of the Christian faith will 
be selected for study in depth. The student will 
select another doctrine for study in depth and cor- 
relate the two, showing their interconnectedness 
and mutual conditioning. 
Weborg Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April 30 TTh 8-9:20 

S-WTS 16-502S 
Theological Bibliography 

A systematic examination of bibliographies in 
biblical studies, church history, liturgies, and 
pastoral ministry. Attention will be given to clas- 
sification and subject headings in theological li- 
braries. One-half unit. 
N. Smith F 9-10:50 Winter 

SCUPE M304 
Christology and Culture 

Introduces Christology from a global, cultural, 
and liberational perspective and its significance 
for urban missiology. Examines issues such as 
racism, advocacy, and human rights emerging 
from life and mission of the church. Fees may 
apply; see p. 43. 

Forbes Winter 

Classes: Jan. 30-31, Feb. 19-21 
Experiential learning: Feb. 2-18 



Ethical Studies 

I. Moral Theology 

CTU E370w 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Wadell TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 



CTU E375w 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

An exploration of the basic texts that illumi- 
nate how the Christian community has under- 
stood and shaped its response to the social con- 



cerns of its time. Emphasis is given to founda- 
tional texts of the Roman Catholic tradition. 
Nairn M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

Pawlikowski TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

LSTC E-310w 
Christian Ethics 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hutter TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

LSTC E-512 

Classics of Western Christian Ethics: 

Augustine, Aquinas, Luther 

Explores thought of the three most crucial theo- 
logians of Western Christianity on the Christian 
life. Focus on relevance of law for Christian ethics 
and how this relates to Christian freedom as life in 
the Spirit. Illuminates contemporary moral issues. 
Hutter Th 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

MTS E-300w 

Introduction to Contemporary Christian 

Ethics 

Introduction to content and methods of Chris- 
tian ethical thought. What is Christian ethics? 
What are ways of doing Christian ethics, and 
what are its primary sources? How are methods 
and sources used in analyzing ethical problems? 
Livezey W 6-8:50 p.m. Winter 

Livezey TTh 8-9:50 Spring 

NPTS THEO7220 

Christian Ethics and the Church 

A study of biblical-theological foundations for 
the Christian ethical life. Role of congregation 
and other church structures in the pursuit of jus- 
tice in society is examined. Five issues confront- 
ing the church and society treated contextually. 
2 hours. 

Nelson Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 T 1-5 

TEDS ST 715 
Christian Ethics 

Biblical perspectives on contemporary ethical 
issues facing the church and minister: divorce, 
abortion, euthanasia, genetic control, sex, war, 
racism, ecology, personal lifestyle, and the 
church's social responsibilities. 
J. Feinberg Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-Mav 8 TBA 



80 



Ethical Studies 



II. Topics in Ethics 

CTS TEC 434 

Womanist Ethics 

Explores ethical implications of three aspects 
of the emergent discipline of womanist ethics — 
survivalism, liberation, and self-expression — 
through engaging some of the lived-world 
struggles and specific life contexts of African 
American women. 
Terrell W 2-5 Winter 

CTU E432 

Ethical Implications of the Holocaust/ 

Genocide 

Examines the annihilation of the Jews as well 
as the slaughter of the incapacitated, the Gyp- 
sies, the Poles, gay persons, and others in WWII 
and considers the churches' ethical responses 
during that period; also treats the broader issue 
of genocide. 
Pawlikowski TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU E444 

Ethical Issues in Economics and Business 

The relationship between Christianity and the 
origins of modern capitalism; a Christian cri- 
tique of capitalism; the corporate responsibility 
movement; international economic issues; eth- 
ics in business. 
Pawlikowski W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU EC 545 

Seminar on Politics and Christian Con- 
science 

Explores relation of Christian life to political life, 
investigating the origin and role of conscience in 
both. Relates conscience to historical realities of 
community and traditions and to the unity of 
theory and practice proper to political conscience. 
Fornasari T 1-3:45 Winter 

CTU EC 570 

Revolution/Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

An examination of various interpretations of 
revolution/liberation in classical Western politi- 
cal philosophy, Third World thought, and 
present-day theological and ethical literature. 
Special attention will be given to Latin Ameri- 
can liberation theology. 
Pawlikowski T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



G-ETS 22-643 
War and Peace 

Examines conflicts in the modern world involv- 
ing technological ethics. Particular focus on those 
domestic and global conflicts where religion 
undergirds ideology, antagonism, and reconciliation. 
K. Vaux Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. 

M/L E338w 

Democratic Public Theology and Ethics 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Engel Winter 

Jan. (1 week TEA) M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required 

MTS E/M-301 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

Readings, case studies, and projects develop 
understanding of and capacities for public min- 
istry. Emphasis on role of church, analysis of 
public issues, and theological/ethical resources. 
Students plan, carry out, and evaluate action on 
a public issue. 
Livezey TTh 10-11:50 Winter 

NBTS CHTE402H 

Etica social II: Una perspectiva historica 

tercermundista 

Una inquisicion — desde la perspectiva de los 
pobres — de los mas importantes movimientos y 
pensadores etico-sociales en la tradicion 
cristiana desde la Reforma hasta los recientes 
desarrollos de la doctrina social catolica. Prereq: 
CHTE 40 1H or permission of instructor. 
Mottesi T 3-6:30 p.m. Winter 

NPTS THE0 6275 

Living Issues in Covenant Life and Thought 

This seminar, primarily for orientation students, 
undertakes in-depth studies of selected contem- 
porary issues being encountered by the Evan- 
gelical Covenant Church (for example, doctrine, 
liturgy, polity, social ethics). 2 hours. 
Nelson Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 Th 6-10 p.m. 

S-WTS 08-603S 
Problems in Ethics 

Moral arguments will be evaluated, with a fo- 
cus on specific moral problems. Assessments of 



Religion and Society Studies 

theological assumptions, practical moral reason- 
ing, use of technical data, and understandings 
of the task of the church. 
TBA TTh 9-10:50 Winter 



Religion and Society 
Studies 

CTS TEC496x 
Good and Evil 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
This tie thwaite W 9-12 Winter 

CTU EC 425 

World Poverty, Development, and Life's 
Liberation 

Investigates and assesses the world's division 
into rich and poor countries. Studies poverty, 
development, and liberation in the light of Scrip- 
ture and Catholic social teaching, using today's 
kairos for Christian communities as focus. 
Fornasari MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU EC545x 

Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Fornasari T 1-3:45 Winter 

G-ETS 22-502 

The Church and Social Systems 

Outline of stances taken by churches toward 
society in different contexts. Types of social sys- 
tems, e.g., patriarchy, racism, liberal democracy. 
Formulation of ethical principles for Christian 
relations to these social systems and models for 
ministry. 

Ruether Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 1:30-3:50 

G-ETS 22-504 

Church and Community 

Analyzes local churches' interaction with their 
communities in city, suburb, and small town as 
basis for ministry in evangelism, counseling, 
social service, and action for social change. 
Theological options, use of social theory and 
data, case studies. 

Tholin Jan. 5-16 Winter 

TWTh 1:30-4:30 + MTWTh 6:30-9 p.m. 



GETS 40-647 
Anthropology of Religion 

Examination of problems and contributions of 
religion and symbolism with an emphasis on 
understanding the function of religion as a cul- 
tural system. 

Thomas Jan. 26— Mar. 20 Winter 

T 6-9:30 p.m. 

LSTC M-370w 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Perry W 2:30-5:30 Winter 



NBTS CT310 

Church and Society: A Cross-Cultural 

Approach 

This course considers theological presupposi- 
tions about the relation of church and society 
and analyzes the U.S. socioeconomic-political- 
cultural situation as a reality in conflict. Stu- 
dents develop paradigms for the church's life 
and mission. L P 

Mottesi Jan. 5-9 Winter 

M-F 9-4 



NPTS MNST5181 

Understanding Church and Culture 

Insights from social sciences for mission of the 
church. Ethnography and ethnotheology, 
indigeneity and syncretism, cross-cultural con- 
flict and communication, modernism and 
postmodernism. Case studies in cultural expres- 
sions of Christianity. 2 hours. 
Carlson/Weld Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April30 TTh 10:30-11:25 



TEDS CC 702 

Christianity and Contemporary Culture II: 

Constructive Engagement 

Examination of biblical basis for engagement 
with contemporary culture. Biblical mandates 
for involvement in social change considered, as 
are means for changing individuals and com- 
munities (prayer, education, personal conver- 
sion, example, etc.) 

Kilner Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 



82 



History of Religions 



World Mission Studies 

CTS TEC 390 

Mission across Cultures 

Exploration of evolving definitions and rel- 
evance of cross-cultural mission, within the U.S. 
and internationally. A diverse selection of lit- 
erature and experience will catalyze the reflec- 
tion and analysis. Reading assignments due at 
first session. L 

C. and T. Montgomery-Fate Winter-Spring 

Sa 9-4:30 

Feb. 21, Mar. 14, April 4, May 2 

CTU C460w 

Training for Cross-Cultural Mission and 

Ministry 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Schroeder/Doidge M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU C 575w 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Schroeder W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU C594 

Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of 

Human Rights Abuses 

Combines theory and field placements with three 
Chicago agencies working with survivors of 
human rights abuses. How does the process of 
accompanying survivors on their journey to heal- 
ing and reconciliation inform our theology, min- 
istry, and spirituality? L 
Barbour M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU CD 465 

Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church 

This course will explore the particular role of 
the Hispanic community as Church in the United 
States by analyzing its sociopolitical context and 
incipient ecclesiology in dialogue with tradi- 
tional ecclesiological sources. 
Riebe-Estrella M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



CTU DC441x 

Christology and Cultures 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Schreiter T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



CTU DC610x 

Theological Anthropology: Cross-Cultural 

Perspective 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Schreiter Th 10-12:45 Winter 

LSTC W-432 

World Religions and the Christian Mission 

Course begins with survey of religions most 
present and active in North American context 
of religious pluralism. How does one do minis- 
try faithfully with neighbors from other tradi- 
tions, and how does religious pluralism change 
Christian theologizing? 
Bliese MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

NPTS MNST7361 

Leadership and Empowering Laity for 

Church Growth 

Examination of nature and issues of leadership 
in the church. Such elements as leadership style, 
team development, change management, spiri- 
tual gifts, and working with volunteers consid- 
ered as they relate to clergy and laity leading 
for church growth. 

Bramer/Carlson/Reed Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-April 30 M 8-12:50 

TEDS ME 721 

Social Science Research in Mission 

This course will introduce students to the phi- 
losophy, logic, and methods of social science 
research. Special attention will be given to de- 
veloping skills in ethnographic field work. 
McKinney Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 

TEDS ME 751 

History of Missions in the Modern World 

A study of the expansion of Christianity from 
Pentecost to the present. 
Tucker Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 

History of Religions 

LSTC W-530 

History of the Development of Religious 

Thought in Islam 

Schisms in Islam caused Muslim thinkers to ask: 



83 



Ministry Studies 

What is Islam? Who is a Muslim? Can God be 
limited? The class will explore some of these 
historic, intellectual, and theological movements 
within Islam. 
Vogelaar TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

LSTC W-531 

The Bible and the Qur'an 

In-depth examination of texts sacred to Chris- 
tians and Muslims. Study of events that pro- 
duced them, their reception and interpretation. 
Reflection on what is common ground, what is 
distinct, and what interfaith conversation re- 
quires. 
Aasi/Vogelaar W 9-12 Winter 



For D.Min. students and graduating seniors; 
others by permission. 

Anderson/ Linnan Sa 9-4 Winter 

Jan. 17; Feb. 7, 21; Mar. 7 

GETS 34-503 

Equipping the Church for Mission and 

Evangelism 

Responsibilities of pastor. Christian educator, 
and laity in leading and empowering the con- 
gregation for mission and evangelism. Theol- 
ogy of church and ministry; congregational 
analysis; styles of leadership and evangelism; 
administrative practices. P 
Alphonse/Scott Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 1:30-3:50 



Ministry Studies 

I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

CTS CM 365 

Global Sensitivity in Ministry 

The learning objectives of this course are to 
improve an understanding of and a responsive- 
ness to social movements, cultural variety, and 
global issues. 
TBA TBA Winter 

CTS CM590zx 
Ministry with Families 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Ulrich Th 1-4 Winter 



G-ETS 34-676 

Chicago — An Asian Immersion Experience 

This immersion intensive will explore issues of 
Christian ministry through felt needs, their com- 
munity dynamics, and their religous and cultural 
heritage. 

Codman-Wilson Jan. 5-23 Winter 

ThF 9-12 + SaSu 9-9 

M/L M308w 

Church Administration 

(For course description see Fall.) 
TBA Jan. (1 week TBA) Winter 

M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required 



CTS TEC 447 

Congregation as Earthen Vessel 

Provides a new means for understanding the 
dynamics of a congregation by considering cur- 
rent thinking in church organizational studies 
as well as the social sciences, selected case stud- 
ies, and strategies for transformative congrega- 
tional change. 
Thompson T 5:30-8:30 p.m. Winter 



M/L M366 

Introduction to Arts of Ministry: Public 

Ministry 

Addresses the role of the liberal church and 
ministry in the world: What is public ministry? 
What and how might all churches and ministers 
best contribute to justice making and the en- 
hancement of public life? 
Engel/Harlow W 9:30-12 Winter 



CTU MP 533 

Pastoral Leadership in the Third Millennium 

Exploration of personal qualities and pastoral 
skills required for leadership in the emerging 
church. Focus on leadership in groups and over- 
sight of ministries and programs of the church. 



M/L M413w 

Leadership Theory and Practice 

(For course description see Fall.) 
TBA Jan. (1 week TBA) 

M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required 



Winter 



MTS M-350K 

Korean Ministries in North American 

Contexts (Taught in Korean) 

Students will reflect critically on themselves as 
persons; examine their models of ministry and 
prepare improved direction/models; review their 
own cultural contexts to equip themselves for 
cross-cultural issues or conflicts. 
Yoon M 1-3:50 Winter 

MTS M-437 

Managing Church Conflicts 

Intensive in three time blocks. First involves 
process for managing church conflicts; second 
uses videotape to practice assertive management 
plans; third is for clarifying remaining concerns. 
Halverstadt Winter 

Jan. 9, 1-9 p.m.; Jan. 10, 9-4; 

Feb. 13, 1-7 p.m.; Feb. 14, 9-4; 
Mar. 6, 1—6 p.m. 

MTS M-453H 

Ministerio hispano y desarrollo 
congregacional 

El curso tiene como enfoque la iglesia latina, 
sus relaciones denominacionales, el contexto de 
lacomunidad y el impacto cultural/religioso que 
los paises de origen tienen en la membresia. 
Rodriguez- Diaz Th 9-11:50 Winter 

MTS M-461 

The Church and Money 

Students learn the many ways to raise money 
for a ministry or congregation. Theologies of 
stewardship, stewardship campaign resources, 
art and talent of grant writing, trials and rewards 
of community fundraising, and availability of 
technical resources. 
Wendorf Th 9-11:50 Winter 

MTS M/E-301 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

(For course description see MTS E/M-301 in 

Ethical Studies II.) 

Livezey TTh 10-11:50 Winter 



NPTS MNST5160 
• Evangelism and Church Planting 

A study of evangelism in its personal and cor- 
porate dimensions. The student will examine the 



Ministry Studies 

biblical basis for evangelism and its present- 
day applications with special emphasis given to 
church planting as an evangelistic strategy. 2 
hours. 

Reed Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 M 8-12:50 



SCUPE M305 

Dimensions and Dynamics of Ministry 

Explores models of effective urban ministry and 
the transformative leadership that contributes 
to their sustained value and vision. Opportunity 
to develop skills and assess leadership poten- 
tial for urban ministry. 4 hours. Fees may ap- 
ply; see p. 43. 
Frenchak Jan. 5-16 Winter 

TEDS CE754 

Change, Power, and Conflict Management 

A study of the process of change, power, and 
conflict management particularly as pertaining 
to a Christian context of ministry. Lectures and 
discussions enhanced with case studies and 
guest instructors in pastoral and management 
roles. 

Benson Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 



II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

CTS CM 415a 

Prayer as the Heart of Religious Leadership: 

Opening the Heart through Centering 

Prayer 

This course focuses on the practical dimensions 
of prayer and religious leadership using sources 
within the Christian tradition and contemporary 
psychology. Thomas Keating' s work is used as 
a model. (Nondivisible 2-quarter course.) L 
Cairns W 9-12 Winter 

CTU B585 

Integrating Seminar: Biblical Spirituality 
Program 

Meets weekly to integrate experience in Israel 
and courses at CTU, ministerial background and 
personal ideals, and contemporary questions for 
a holistic biblical spirituality. Restricted to 



85 



Ministry Studies 

participants in any of the CTU Israel programs. 
Reid/Race T 3-6 p.m. Winter 

CTU DCS 575 

Black Spirituality 

This seminar will engage students in a critical 
examination of the African roots, development, 
and characteristics of the spirituality of African 
Americans forged in the redemptive suffering 
of slavery and black life in the United States. 
Phelps ' MW 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU S402 

Introduction to the Christian Spiritual Life 

Surveys traditional and contemporary practices 
of prayer, community, service, discernment, and 
spiritual guidance, with the aim of assisting 
development of an integrated vision of the Chris- 
tian spiritual life. 
Lescher MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU S414 

Theology and Practice of Prayer 

With the "dwelling places" of Teresa of Avila 
as a guide, this course offers the student a theo- 
logical and practical introduction to the Chris- 
tian life of prayer. 
LaChance MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU S524 
Women's Spirituality 

This course in practical theology explores the 
characteristics and themes of women's spiritu- 
ality with attention to personal spiritual prac- 
tice, historical development, and cultural con- 
text. 
Cahill T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU S529w 

History of Spirituality: Trent to Vatican II 

An overview of significant persons and move- 
ments in the history of spirituality from the 16th 
to the 20th century. 

Lescher W 1-3:45 Winter 

Lescher TEA Spring 

CTU S540 

Group Spiritual Process 

Participants will practice and study a group re- 
flective process for spiritual formation. Students 



may subsequently form and lead a group of their 
own as part of the Supervised Leadership Train- 
ing (D.Min.) or another ministry practicum. P L 
Luther W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

M/L I300w 

Spiritual Journey Workshop 

An immersion into the process of our own spiri- 
tual journeying, employing a method of theo- 
logical reflection as developed by E. Whitehead, 
T. Groome, H. R. Niebuhr, and others, with ap- 
plication for personal and institutional use. One- 
half credit. P L 

Gerdes T 4-5:30 Winter 

Gerdes T 4-5:30 Spring 

NPTS SPFM5103 

Spiritual Formation: Spiritual Disciplines 

The course offers instruction and practice in a 
variety of ways in which the disciplines help to 
foster and sustain faith, hope, and love in the 
life of the believer. One-half hour. 
Weborg Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 T 1-3:05 

S-WTS 06-50 IS 
Spirituality for Ministry 

An introduction to types of spirituality and spiri- 
tual disciplines, resources for personal and pro- 
fessional formation, and the role of spirituality 
in the practical life of the church. 
Barker MW 1-2:50 Winter 



III. Pastoral Care 

CTS CM 335 

African American Pastoral Psychology 

Course considers the African American approach 
to human nature, personality theory, and key 
concepts. Biblical texts will be woven with the 
psychological theories to encourage a pastoral 
approach to psychotherapy. 
Butler W 2-5 Winter 

CTS CM 430 

Short-term Pastoral Counseling 

Course will focus on effective management and 
prevention of crises as well as on effective in- 
terventions through the development of coun- 



86 



Ministry Studies 



seling skills and techniques. Videotaped roles 

will be one learning tool. 

Butler M 2-5 Winter 

CTS CM590z 
Ministry with Families 

Examining multigenerational perspectives on 
family development and family-oriented minis- 
try, cross-cultural influences, and family-systems 
theory and therapy modalities for pastoral care. 
Doctoral course; permission required for 
nondoctoral students. 
Ulrich Th 1-4 Winter 



CTU MP360w 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Anderson TTh 8:30-9:45 



G-ETS 32-501w 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Poling Jan. 26-Mar. 20 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. 



Winter 



Winter 



practice of biblical scholarship contributes to the 

theology and practice of pastoral care, and vice 

versa. 

Billman/Rossing W 2:30-5:30 Winter 

LSTC M-484 

Ritual and Pastoral Care 

Explores the interface between pastoral care and 
the occasional services of the church. How does 
the church's liturgical life meet the many hu- 
man needs that attend baptism, marriage, con- 
firmation, services of healing, or Christian fu- 
nerals? 

Bangert/Billman Winter 

T 1-2:15 + Th 2:30-3:45 

MS PL374 

Race and Pastoral Practice 

What are some of the obstacles and opportuni- 
ties that arise in a parish or diocese regarding 
racial differences? What are effective pastoral 
strategies that might be implemented? What is 
the role of the minister? 
McOuaid W 1:15-4 Winter 



GETS 32-611 
Pastoral Theology 

Exploration of integration of theology with prac- 
tice of pastoral care and counseling through use 
of clinical and parish case studies presented by 
participants. Level II and III students. L 
Hogue Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 8:30-10:50 



MTS M-310 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Course leads students toward basic understand- 
ing of meaning and practice of pastoral care and 
helps students acquire skills necessary for field 
education, clinical pastoral education, and pas- 
toral ministry. L 
Ashby W 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 



GETS 32-617 

Emotional and Spiritual Empowerment for 

Ministry 

Provides a foundation to enable transformation 
of "negative" feelings and impulses into spiri- 
tually powerful sources of motivation and 
strength by developing an informed perspective 
on, and praxis with regard to, various human 
emotions and impulses. 

Hinkle Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. 

LSTC M-429 

The Bible and Pastoral Care: 

Hermeneutical Challenges 

This course explores how the understanding and 



MTS M-323 

Domestic Violence, Pastoral Care, and the 

Church 

Examination of traditions of pastoral care and 
of social conditions that have influenced domes- 
tic violence. Development of models of care to 
enable the church to be agent of change, heal- 
ing, reconciliation. Special attention to African 
American community. 
Ellis Th 6-8:50 p.m. Winter 

NBTS PC 415 

Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 

A course that will enable students to define the 
relationships between spiritual direction and 
pastoral care. The emphasis will be on develop- 



87 



Ministry Studies 

ing skills for spiritual direction within the con- 
text of pastoral care. 
Justes W 9:30-12:30 Winter 

NPTS MNST6120 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Case method, role play, demonstrations, read- 
ings, and lecture impart strategies and skills to 
equip the pastor for working with the congrega- 
tion and providing an effective ministry to per- 
sonal and family needs. 2 hours. 
Jackson Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 M 8-12:50 

S-WTS 12-512S 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

The course will expose prospective parish priests 
to the theory and practice of pastoral care. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the development of 
pastoral skills, as well as theological, cross-cul- 
tural, and psychological models of interpreta- 
tion. 
Ikenye M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 

TEDS PC 674 

Child and Adolescent Counseling 

Analysis of the reciprocal influences between 
the family and the child in the context of other 
socializing influences. The biological, cognitive, 
affective, and social-personal domains of devel- 
opment are analyzed from a systemic perspective. 
Greggo Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TEA 



IV. Liturgy and Worship 

CTS CM 314 

The Worshiping Congregation 

Meaning and practice of congregational worship 
with special attention to pastoral dimension of 
worship and role of worship leader. The liturgi- 
cal year will provide basic structure, but study 
will include marriage, funeral, and occasional 
services. 
Edgerton T 2-5 Winter 



CTU W355 

Sacraments: Theology and Celebration 

A basic course in sacraments to explore the hu- 
man religious experience of the faith commu- 
nity and its expressions in sacramental celebra- 
tion. The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults 
will serve as a basis for examining new sacra- 
mental models. 
Hughes W 2:30-5:15 Winter 

CTU W561 

Of Magic and Miracles: Medieval Worship 

The Middle Ages helped determine the shape 
of Christian worship. This seminar will provide 
a historical introduction to the period and ex- 
plore some of its key liturgical practices (bene- 
diction, pilgrimages, profession rites, and ven- 
eration of relics). 
Foley M 10-12:45 Winter 

CTU W615 

A Theology of Word and Sacrament 

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the 
unity and interaction of word and sacrament in 
liturgical celebration. It joins together histori- 
cal interpretation with theological reflection and 
pastoral considerations. 
Fragomeni W 10-12:45 Winter 



CTU W652 
Language of Prayer 

This seminar will explore the ways in which 
liturgical language functions in Christian wor- 
ship. Students will examine the structure, style, 
and content of various genres of liturgical prayer 
with particular attention to contemporary litur- 
gical texts. 
Hughes T 10-12:45 Winter 



GETS 31-511 w 
Christian Public Worship 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Brugh Jan. 5-16 Winter 

MF8-12 + TWTh 8-11 



CTU W350w 
Introduction to Liturgy 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Ostdiek M 7-9:45 p.m. 



Winter 



GETS 31-515 
Hymnody in Worship 

An overview and analysis of congregational song 
in the context of worship, with special attention 



88 



to patterns of worship, the church year, celebration 

of the sacraments, and the use of the Psalter. L 

Duck Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

W 9-10:50 + F 9-1 J: 50 

G-ETS 31-607 

Gender, Language, and Worship 

The intersection of theological perspectives re- 
lated to gender issues with reflective and cre- 
ative worship, preaching, and liturgical lan- 
guage. L 

Duck Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

W 9-10:50 + F 9-11:50 



Ministry Studies 

LSTC M-484x 

Ritual and Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 

Bangert/Billman Winter 

T 1-2:15 + Th 2:30-3:45 

M/L M314w 

Worship Theory and Liturgy in the Liberal 

Tradition 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Gibbons Jan. (1 week TBA) Winter 

M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required 



G-ETS 31-634 

Healing and Reconciliation in Christian 

Worship 

Explores healing and reconciliation through 
theological reflection and the study and design 
of worship services. Emphasis is on divine love 
and power at work restoring physical, emotional, 
spiritual well-being and right relationships 
through worship. 
Duck/Hogue Jan. 5-23 TBA Winter 

G-ETS 31-635 

Seminar in Liturgical Theology 

An investigation of contemporary liturgical the- 
ology through works of Protestant, Catholic, and 
Orthodox scholars. Students present results of 
research to the class. L 

D. Vogel Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

T 6-9:30 p.m. 

LSTC H-460x 

A History of the Relationships between Art 

and Religion 

(For course description see Historical Studies V.) 

Caemmerer Feb. 16-Mar. 12 Winter 

MTTh 7-9:50 p.m. 

LSTC M-380 
Worship 

A focus on pastoral and presidential leadership 
of the Lutheran liturgy, liturgical theology, over- 
view of Christian worship, the arts and music 
in the liturgy, communication skills, and plan- 
ning for worship. 
Bangert MW 1-2:15 Winter 

+ sec. Th 1-1:50 
Bangert MW 7-8:45 p.m. Winter 



MTS M-307x 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and 

Worship in the Presbyterian Church 

(U.S.A.) 

(For course description see Ministry Studies 

VII.) 

Smith T 5-7:50 p.m. Winter 

S-WTS 09-6 19S 

Sacramental Theology of the Reformation 

Exploration of the sacramental teaching of re- 
formers in the Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, 
and Anabaptist traditions. 
Meyers TTh 1-2:50 Winter 

TEDS PT770 
Christian Worship 

The importance, basic meaning, and historical 
background of Christian worship with attention 
to principles, plans, methods, and resources for 
worship planning. 

Bullmore Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TBA 



V. Preaching and Communication 

CTU MW450w 

Introduction to Liturgical Preaching 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Fragomeni T 1-3:45 Winter 



G-ETS 31-501w 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Chatfield Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 1:30-3:50 



89 



Ministry Studies 

LSTC B-455x 

Preparing Your First Sermons 

(For course description see Biblical Studies.) 
Krentz TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

LSTC M-340 
Preaching 

The aim of the course is to help students de- 
velop a holistic view of preaching which does 
justice to four factors: the preacher, the listener, 
the message, and the churchly context, so as to 
establish sound practice in sermon design and 
delivery. 

Jensen T 10:45-12 Winter 

+ sec: M 10:30-12:15; 1:30-3:15; 

T 8-9:45; 1-2:45 

Jensen Th 7-9:50 Winter 

meets at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, St. Charles 

M/L M324 
Advanced Preaching 

Course aims to help students find their own 
voices in preaching. Extensive experience in 
preaching; videotaping and group exercises. Stu- 
dents will develop a personally and theologi- 
cally grounded statement concerning role of 
preaching in their ministry. 
Evison TEA Winter 

MTS M-324 
Introducing Preaching 

This course brings together in acts of preaching 
the life of God's people in Scripture with the 
life of God's people today. Preparation of two 
sermons from exegesis through delivery. Taught 
by a multicultural preaching team. 
TEA + team MW 10-11:50 Winter 

NBTS ME 314 

Evangelism in the Local Church 

An examination of various local church-based 

approaches to evangelism. 

Price M 1-4:30 Winter 

NPTS MNST5110 
Public Communication 

Practice of skills necessary for communicating 
the Christian faith in various public settings. 
Exercises in telling stories, reading Scripture, 



and leading worship develop awareness of 
speaking environments, nonverbal language, 
voice production. 1 hour. 
Koptak Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 Th 1:50-3:40 



TEDS H762 
Evangelistic Preaching 

Preparation and presentation of sermons for vari- 
ous evangelistic and conference occasions. 
Larsen Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TEA 



VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

CTS CM 322 

The Church's Ministry with Youth 

Offering three distinct youth ministry models, 
course emphasizes team and peer ministry, lead- 
ership styles, understanding one's own adoles- 
cence, developmental ly based retreats, covenan- 
tal discipline, symbol making, and centrality of 
sacred space. 
Myers T 9-12 Winter 

GETS 33-611 

Youth, Culture, and the Church 

Design of strategies for the church's ministry 
with youth and young adults. Issues relating 
rhythms of young people's lives with dynamics 
of family, school, church and peer groups, e.g., 
disaffected youth, pressures for achievement, 
media, and gangs. L 

Donald Baker Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. 

GETS 33-635 

History and Theories of Christian Education 

Examines the development of Christian religious 
education as an academic discipline and minis- 
try in church and society in the 19th and 20th 
centuries and helps students formulate their own 
stance in educational ministry. Prereq: 2 courses 
in Christian education. L 
Seymour Jan. 5-16 Winter 

MF 8-12 + TWTh 8-11 



90 



Ministry Studies 



LSTC M-460 
Ministry with Youth 

This course deals with the theological and de- 
velopmental principles guiding a ministry with 
youth, examining the resources available from 
a variety of groups and exploring the settings 
and strategies that can be employed. 
Conrad Th 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 



M/L M415w 

Religious Education Curriculum 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Harlow Jan. (1 week TEA) Winter 

M-F 9-5 
Fall registration required 

MTS M/B-426 
Teaching the Bible 

Issues include use of seminary language/bibli- 
cal study for teaching in the church; critical 
evaluation of curricula that focus on biblical 
content; appropriate methods for use in teach- 
ing youth and adults modeled in classroom ses- 
sions. Prereq: B-300. 
Caldwell/Tanzer MW 2-3:50 Winter 



NPTS CEDF5102 

Theories of Christian Education and 

Formation 

A model of the elements in Christian education 
will be developed followed by the examination 
of contemporary approaches to Christian reli- 
gious education and including such themes as 
faith development, community, and praxis. 1 
hour. 

Bramer Spring Semester, Quad A 

Jan. 12-Mar. 9 T 3:15-5:05 



NPTS CEDF6212 

Programming and Resources in Children's 

Ministry 

This course will focus on ways of helping chil- 
dren learn and apply the biblical story. Partici- 
pants will examine the scope and sequence of 
curriculum and appropriate teaching techniques. 
1 hour. 

TEA Spring Semester, Quad A 

2 Saturdays Jan. 31, Feb. 14 TEA 



NPTS CEDF6218 
Teaching Confirmation 

Theological and pedagogical issues in teaching 
confirmation will be discussed. There will be 
an orientation to the confirmation materials and 
support literature used in the Evangelical Cov- 
enant Church. 1 hour. 

TEA Spring Semester, Quad A 

2 Saturdays Jan. 24, Feb. 7 TEA 

TEDS CE671 

Youth Ministry Strategies: Contemporary 

Church 

Principles of parachurch- or church-based youth 
ministry. Biblical/theological foundations for 
understanding adolescents and building a phi- 
losophy of evangelism, methodologies for con- 
tacting students, personal evangelism, outreach 
in groups, discipling. 

Senter Spring Semester 

Jan. 12-May 8 TEA 

VII. Polity and Canon Law 

CTU MW422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of the canon 
law regulating baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, 
penance, anointing of the sick, and marriage. 
TEA M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

GETS 40-673 

United Methodist Studies: 20th Century 

Developments within 20th-century United 
Methodism, as related to the ecumenical move- 
ment, denominational unification, world mis- 
sion, personal evangelism, and social justice. 
Evolution of polity, nature of ministry, and de- 
nominational structure. 

Troxell Jan. 26-Mar. 20 Winter 

TTh 1:30-3:50 

MTS M-307 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship 

in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 

Preparation for thinking and acting effectively 
in various church structures. Special attention 
given to relation between polity, politics, lead- 
ership, and church life. 
Smith T 5-7:50 p.m. Winter 



91 



Biblical Studies 

SPRING 1998 
Biblical Studies 

CTU BW574 

Feminist Hermeneutics and Worship 

Exploration through reading, discussion, and 
ritual of how women's changing experience is 
transforming their faith and faith expressions. 
Hughes/Osiek Spring 

Apr. 3-4, 24-25, May 15-16 
F 7-9:45 p.m.; Sa 9-4:30 

CTU SB 480 

Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The religions of Israel and early Christianity are 
investigated not only in their historical and bib- 
lical setting but also in their impact on Chris- 
tian life and ministry. 
Bowe MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

MTS B-506 

Biblical Field Seminar: The Historical 

Jesus 

This course will focus on critical evaluations of 
the quest for the historical Jesus, with emphasis 
on the nature of history and its relationship to 
faith. Prereq: B-300. Biblical languages desirable. 
Bible Field (Brawley, convenor) Spring 

F 9-11:50 

NBTS BS302 

Methods of Biblical Interpretation 

A course designed to provide students with skills 
to interpret biblical texts. Students will focus on one 
book from each testament with a view toward ex- 
position for teaching, preaching, and prayer. 
Mainelli W 2:30-5:10 Spring 

Old Testament 

I. Introductory 

LSTC B-313 
Israel's Prophets 

Studies in the literature of the prophetic tradi- 
tion, including detailed exegesis of selected 
passages. Knowledge of Hebrew presupposed. 
Michel MTh 10:45-12 Spring 

Fuerst Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 



II. Canonical Corpus 

CTS CH410 

The Festival Scrolls: Ruth, Song of Songs, 

Ecclesiastes, Lamentations, Esther 

A consideration of the Megillot, five biblical 
books traditionally read at Jewish festivals. At- 
tention given to literary structure, sociohistorical 
context, and history of interpretation. 
Stone W 2-5 Spring 

CTS CH414 

Major Themes in Psalms 

A study of the Psalms, seeking major themes of 
theological, liturgical, and historical conse- 
quence. 
Schaalmann Th 9-12 Spring 

CTU B400 
Pentateuch 

A study of the structure and themes of the 
Pentateuch viewed as narrative. The main is- 
sues in each book will be examined. Some in- 
troduction is given to the documentary hypoth- 
esis and to trends in Pentateuch research. 
Okoye MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

CTU B420 
Psalms 

Studies psalms from each literary or liturgical 
category for language, form, and theology. Ex- 
plores their presence in the traditions of Israel 
and the New Testament. Helpful for students 
of liturgy and spirituality. Prereq: B 300 or 
equiv. 
Bergant MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

G-ETS 11-603 
Prophetic Books: Hosea 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes. Emphasis on analytical and synthetic 
interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511 or equiv. L 
Bird MW 5:30-7:30 p.m. Spring 

GETS 11-607 

Psalms and Wisdom: Ecclesiastes 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes. Emphasis on analytical and synthetic 
interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511 or equiv. L 
Duncan TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 



92 



Old Testament 



MTS B-406 

From David to Daniel: History, Literature, 

Theological Ferment 

Study of the Israelite and Jewish literature from 
2 Samuel to 1 Maccabees, giving in-depth at- 
tention to representatives of each canonical di- 
vision and literary category. Prereq: B 300 or 
equiv. 
TBA MW 10-11:50 Spring 

NETS OT303 
Wisdom Literature 

An introduction to the critical, historical, and 
theological study of the books of Job, Psalms, 
Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the concept of 
Wisdom in the Ancient Near East and Israel. L 
Mariottini T 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

NPTS BIBL5142 
The Book of Joshua 

An inductive study of Joshua, focusing on its 
literary forms, cultural background, and theo- 
logical perspective. Particular attention to book's 
practical implications, especially the nature of 
God and the problems of war and cultural con- 
quest. 2 hours. 

Hubbard Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 M 6-10 p.m. 

S-WTS 01-610S 
Studies in the Pentateuch 

The formation of Israel as the covenanted people 
of God, specifically attending to the nature of 
God and the role of the human moral agent as 
model for leadership, as well as the concepts of 
covenant, commitment, law, and ritual. 
Deeley WF 9-10:50 Spring 



III. Topics in Old Testament 

CTS CH403 

Apocalyptic Literature in Judaism and 

Christianity 

An introduction to apocalyptic texts with con- 
sideration of literary genre, sociohistorical ma- 
trix, relation to prophetic books, and reception 
by later religious communities. 
Stone T 9-12 Spring 



CTU BC555 

Prophecy in Cross-Cultural Perspective: 

Approaches to Old Testament Prophecy 

Criteria are established for studying prophetic 
activity across faiths and cultures and between 
ancient and modern times. Case studies of mod- 
ern prophetic activity in various continents are 
studied. OT prophecy is reread from this per- 
spective. 
Okoye W 10-12:45 Spring 

CTU SB629x 

Jewish Mysticism, Messianism, and 

Spirituality 

(For course description see Ministry Studies II.) 
Perelmuter W 8:30-1 1:15 Spring 

LSTC B-516 
Arguing with God 

Thorough study of the Book of Job in a literal 
translation (provided by instructor) based on 
1 929 archaeological discoveries; introduction to 
"arguing with God" tradition in Bible; sugges- 
tions for teaching and preaching in this impor- 
tant area. 
Michel T 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC B-630 

Graduate Biblical Seminar II 

An ongoing seminar on the Old Testament. 
Theme for 1998: Studies in Jeremiah with fo- 
cus on watershed political and theological events 
in late 7th and early 6th centuries B.C. (For post- 
M.Div. students. Admission of others by con- 
sent of instructor.) 
Fuerst M 12:30-3:45 Spring 

MTS B-413 

The Prophet and Society 

A study of the role of the Old Testament prophet 
(ecstatic, foreteller, social critic), the prophet's 
relation to society (its political and religious 
institutions), and the relevance of the prophetic 
role for modern ministry. 
Hiebert MW 8-9:50 Spring 

NBTS OT515 

Prayer in the Old Testament 

A study of the different forms of prayer in the 
Old Testament. This course will introduce stu- 



93 



Old Testament 



dents to Old Testament spirituality and the place 

of prayer in Israelite piety. 

Mariottini Th 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

IV. Hebrew Language 

CTU B326 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II 

This is the second part of a two-quarter course 

which studies the grammar and vocabulary of 

biblical Hebrew in order to prepare students to 

work with the Hebrew text. Prereq: B 325 or 

equiv. 

Hoppe MTWTh 3:45-4:45 Spring 

GETS 11-643 
Intermediate Hebrew 

Rapid reading of prose and poetry, review of 
grammar and vocabulary, introduction to text 
criticism. Prereq: 1 1-641/642 or equiv. 
Duncan F 9-12 Spriing 

S-WTS 01-522GS 
Elementary Biblical Hebrew II 

A sequel to Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (pre- 
requisite for this course), designed to develop 
one's ability to handle the original text through 
grammar and vocabulary and translation of as- 
signed portions. 
TBA MTWTh 4-4:50 Spring 



New Testament 

I. Introductory 

CTU B305s 

New Testament Introduction 

(For course description see Winter.) 

Reid T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 12-502s 

New Testament Interpretation: Romans- 
Revelation 

(For course description see Winter.) 

Yeo T 6-9 p.m. Spring 



NBTS NT 302 
Paul and His Letters 

This course is a general introduction to the let- 
ters and theology of Paul. Special attention is 
given to recent Pauline scholarship and to is- 
sues of method in the interpretation and use of 
Paul today. 
Cosgrove Sa 1:30-4:10 Spring 

S-WTS 02-502GS 

New Testament Interpretation II: Romans- 
Revelation 

Builds on the work done in New Testament In- 
terpretation I and focuses particular attention on 
first-century Judaism, primarily on St. Paul and 
New Testament books outside the Gospels. 
TBA MW 1-2:50 Spring 

II. Books of the New Testament 

CTS CH424 

The Theology of John 

An exegetical study of the Gospel of John with 
the intent of seeing Christian reality from the 
point of view of the author of the fourth Gospel. 
Special emphasis is placed on its particular style. 
Snyder M 9-12 Spring 

CTU B430 

The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the context, structure, and major 
motifs of the Gospel of Matthew. Particular at- 
tention will be given to the evangelist's role as 
an interpreter of tradition and history for a com- 
munity in transition. Prereq: B 305 or equiv. 
Senior W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU B453 

Paul: The Corinthian Correspondence 

A study of Paul and his theology with special 
focus on 1-2 Corinthians, the primary letters in 
which to see Paul's pastoral theology and spiri- 
tuality at work. 

LaVerdiere Spring 

Sa 9-3 April 18, 25; May 2, 9, 16 



LSTC B-331s 

Jesus and the Gospels 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Krentz MW 1-2:50 

Rhoads MW 1-2:50 



Spring 
Spring 



G-ETS 12-625 
Luke- Acts 

Study of the main themes of Luke- Acts through 
an exegetical and historical analysis of selected 
passages. Attention given to genre and the rhe- 



94 



torical devices that mediate the theology of the 

author. L 

Vena WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTC B-470 

The Strange World of Mark 

Exploring cosmos, angels and demons, illness, 
time and space, honor and shame, purity and 
defilement, kinship, gender, kingdom and soci- 
ety, economy and politics, and more, in the Gos- 
pel of Mark. 
Rhoads M 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC B-548 

The Book of Revelation and Its Interpreters 

A study of the book of Revelation's visionary 
imagery and structure, its message of hope and 
judgment, its prophetic setting in communities 
of first-century Asia Minor, and its interpretive 
life in art, film, literature, and recent liberation 
movements. 

Rossing W 6-9 p.m. Spring 

meets at ELCA, 8765 W. Higgins Rd. 

MTS B-407 
The Gospels 

Introduction to the four canonical Gospels with 
special focus on the unique portrait of Jesus each 
presents. Major issues and methods for study of 
Gospel literature. Central emphasis on 
I Christology; minor attention to the historical 
Jesus. Prereq: B-300. 
Tanzer MW 2-3:50 Spring 

MTS B-418 

The Revelation to John 

What kind of literature is Revelation, and what 
does it have to say? This exegetical course will 
focus on the genre of the Apocalypse and its sig- 
nificance for contemporary faith. Prereq: B-300. 
Brawley TTh 10-11:50 Spring 

MTS B-438 
1 Corinthians 

Examination of Paul's letter of reconciliation to 
the church at Corinth, with particular attention to the 
"practical ecclesiology" it expounds. Churches, 
both ancient and modern, have a powerful need 
for unity, yet its costs are inescapable. L 
Mitchell T 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 



New Testament 

NBTS NT404H 

El Evangelio de Juan 

Este curso intenta una compresion clara del 
cuarto evangelio y de la comunidad de fe donde 
se lo forjo. Se analizara dos veces: primero en 
procura de temas centrales, y segundo siguiendo 
la narrativa del evangelio. 
Weiss Th 6:30-9:10 p.m. Spring 

NPTS BIBL5171 

The Pastoral Letters: 1-2 Timothy and 

Titus 

Analysis of local church ministry as reflected in 
1-2 Timothy and Titus. Focus on problems faced 
in pastoral ministry (e.g., heresy, worship order 
and roles, leadership qualifications, finances) 
with view to developing models for ministry 
today. 2 hours. 

Belleville Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 TTh 3:15-5:05 



III. Topics in New Testament 

CTU BW466 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

The Liturgy of the High Holy Days (Rosh 
Hashana, Yom Kippur, and Sukkot) and its theo- 
logical implications. In addition to examining 
the core structure, the course will give special 
attention to the Piyyutim (religious poetry). 
Perelmuter MW 1-2:15 Spring 

G-ETS 12-619 

New Testament Interpretation through 

Cross-Cultural Eyes 

An exercise in cross-cultural hermeneutics. As 
the students work exegetically through some key 
New Testament passages, four different ap- 
proaches to the Bible will be spelled out: Afri- 
can American, feminist/womanist, Asian, and 
Hispanic. L 
Vena TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 



LSTC B-666 

Graduate Biblical Seminar VI: The 

Apocalypse of John 

Advanced exegesis of book of Revelation: lan- 
guage, literary structure, apocalyptic background 



95 



New Testament 



(Jewish, Greco-Roman), prophetic critique of 
Rome, lst-century setting. (For post-M.Div. stu- 
dents; others by consent. Willingness to read 
Greek texts necessary.) 
Rossing T 1-4:30 Spring 



MS BI353 

Passion Narratives (G) 

An exhaustive look at the passion and resurrec- 
tion narratives in an attempt to see how they 
were put together and what they tell us about 
the communities that put together earliest rec- 
ollections of Jesus' life. 
Mc I I hone MTh 2:40-4 Spring 

IV. New Testament Greek 

CTU B441 

Gospel of John from the Greek Text 

A study of the Gospel of John with attention to 
its distinctive style and theology and to its over- 
all structure and content. Prereq: elementary 
Greek. L 
Bowe TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 



Historical Studies 

I. Introductory 

GETS 13-502s 
History of Christianity II 

(For course description see Winter.) 
TBA Th 6-9 p.m. 



GETS 13-503s 

History of Christianity III 

(For course description see Fall.) 
TBA TTh 1:30-3:20 



Spring 



Spring 



MTS H-300s 

Transformations of Christianity: A 

Foundational Course 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Rodriguez-Diaz MW 6- 7:50 p.m. Spring 

S-WTS 03-502S 

The Medieval Church (600-1400) 

A survey of church history from Gregory the 
Great to the Renaissance, with emphasis on institu- 
tional, theological, and devotional developments. 
Kieckhefer TTh 9-10:50 Spring 



LSTC B-309s 

Greek Readings: The Lectionary Lessons 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Choi M 12-12:50 Spring 



MTS B-325 

Introduction to Greek Exegesis II 

Completes introduction to Greek begun in B- 
324; see description in Winter. 

Tanzer MTh 10-11:50 Spring 

TBA TF 10-11:50 Spring 



S-WTS 02-522GS 
Elementary Greek II 

A sequel to Elementary Greek I (prerequisite 
for this course), designed to develop one's abil- 
ity to handle the original text through review of 
grammar and vocabulary and translation of as- 
signed portions. 
TBA MTWTh 4-4:50 Spring 



II. History of Particular Traditions 

CTS CH367 

History and Polity of the United Church of 

Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology, and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, includ- 
ing its antecedents: the Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches and the Evangelical and Reformed 
Church. This course meets current UCC require- 
ments for ordination. 
Bueschel Th 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC H-360 

Lutheran Confessional Heritage 

An introduction to the classical confessions of 
the Lutheran Reformation: their origins and re- 
lation to Scripture and creeds; their theological 
and practical content; their implications for 
Lutheran identity, pastoral practice, and ecu- 
menical relations. 

Hendel T 8:30-9:45; 10:45-12 Spring 
Hutter Th 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 



96 



Historical Studies 



LSTC H-468 

The Woman Problem in the History of 

Christian Theology 

Place of women in history and theology of the 
church. Reading of works from Christian theo- 
logians of every epoch. Nature and purpose of 
women, women's moral agency, rationale for 
both limiting and expanding women's partici- 
pation in church structures. 
Jurisson T 2:30-5:30 Spring 

MTS H-330 

History of the Black Church in North 

America 

Study of the major issues and events in the de- 
velopment of the black church from the slavery 
era to the present, with particular focus on folk 
religion, protest movements, theological devel- 
opments, and ecclesial expressions. 
Daniels M 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 



MTS H-485H 

Historia de la iglesia hispana en los 
E.E.U.U. 

El curso introducira al alumno a los origenes, 

desarrollo y estado actual de las iglesias hispanas 

en los E.E.U.U. Se pondra enfasis en la 

desarrollo de sus teologias, asi como las distintas 

eclesiologias que la han dado concercion 

historica. 

Rodriguez- Diaz Th 9-11:50 Spring 



III. History — Individuals 

LSTC H-435 
Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this course is to examine Luther's 
theology by exploring its broad comprehensive- 
ness as well as its evangelical center. Selected 
works on various theological themes are dis- 
cussed. 
Hendel M 1-4 Spring 



NPTS HIST 5135 
Theology of Luther 

This seminar examines through reading, re- 
search, and discussion the selected treatises of 
Luther with particular reference to major doc- 



trinal themes of the Reformation set in their his- 
torical context. 2 hours. 

TBA Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 M 6-10 p.m. 



IV. American Church History 

MTS H-423 

American Christianity and Modernity 

Study of the transformation of U.S. Christianity 
through its encounter with modernity from the 
colonial era to the present, highlighting renewal 
movements, theological trends, liturgical cur- 
rents, and social reform movements. 
Daniels W 9-11:50 Spring 

NBTS CH407 

History of American Religion 

A survey of American religious history from 
before the European settlement to the present, 
with special emphasis on religious diversity and 
the changing role of religion in public life. 
Weber W 2:30-5:10 Spring 

NBTS CH461 
Denominational Heritage 

A course designed for non-Baptist students to 
meet NBTS's "denominational heritage" re- 
quirement. To be conducted in the form of coor- 
dinated independent studies. 
Dayton M 9:30-12:10 Spring 



V. Topics in Church History 

CTU CH325 

Models of Missionary Activity 

A survey of the variety of forms of missionary 
activity in the church's history from the Apolo- 
gists in the Roman Empire to the classical image 
of the 19th-century missionary. The relevance 
of these models for mission today is also con- 
sidered. 
Schroeder MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 



NBTS CHTE404Hx 

La violencia y la iglesia cristiana 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Horning TBA Spring 




97 



Theological Studies 

Theological Studies 

I. Introductory and Foundational 

CTU D325s 

Introduction to Theology 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Bevans TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

G-ETS 21 -500s 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contempo- 
rary Theology 

(For course description see Fall.) 

D. Vogel MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 21-502s 
Systematic Theology II 

(For course description see Winter.) 

Will TTh 3:30-5:20 Spring 

LSTC T-313 
Christian Theology III 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence, see LSTC T-31 1, Christian Theology I 
(Fall). The third course in the sequence deals 
with the Holy Spirit, the church, the means of 
grace, the Christian life, and eschatology. 
Westhelle W 6-9 p.m. Spring 

Hefner TTh 1-2:15 Spring 

+ sec. Th 2:15-3:05 

MTS T-300s 

Introduction to Christian Theology 

(For course description see Winter.) 
Parker/Rivera-Rodriguez Spring 

TTh 6-7:50 p.m. 

S-WTS 05-6 15S 
Development of Doctrine 

An overview of the development of selected issues 
in Christian thought from the 1st through the 19th 
century. Faith and reason; Christ and salvation. 
Barker TTh 1-2:50 Spring 

II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

CTS TEC 531b 

Paul Tillich on Theology, Ethics, and the 

Human Sciences 

An advanced seminar on the thought of Paul 

Tillich. Prereq: TEC 531a. 

Moore M 2-5 Spring 



CTS TEC 534 
Jurgen Moltmann 

A reading seminar covering the basic works of 

Jurgen Moltmann. 

Jennings M 9-12 Spring 

CTU B541 
Fundamentalism 

A seminar focusing on the origins of fundamen- 
talism and its approach to biblical interpreta- 
tion with an attempt to formulate a pastoral re- 
sponse to the theological stance and proselytiz- 
ing efforts of fundamentalists. 
Hoppe W 8:30-11:15 Spring 

GETS 21-643 

Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought 

Major theological currents in modern Judaism 
and their relationship to general philosophy and 
theology. History of Jewish communities, insti- 
tutions, and problems in the last 200 years. Re- 
ligious structure of contemporary Jewish com- 
munity. One-half unit. 
Schaalmann T 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTC T-529 

The Theology of Karl Barth 

This seminar will explore the theological 
thought of one of the foremost theologians of 
the 20th century in its intellectual and po- 
litical context. 
Hutter W 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

M/L TS322 

Literature for Liberal Religion: Liberal 

Religious Texts 

In search of "scriptures" for the liberal faith, 
this course explores materials in literature, the- 
ater, music, and the fine arts. How do such texts 
gain authority for us? How do we use and inter- 
pret in worship, preaching, education, and pub- 
lic ministry? 
Engel et al. TBA Spring 

NPTS HIST 6254 

Pentecostal and Charismatic History and 

Theology 

A historical and theological approach to the 
emergence of the Pentecostal and charismatic 
traditions in the American experience. Special 
attention to the varieties of interpretation of the 



QS 



Theological Studies 



movements and to contemporary controversies 
within them. 2 hours. 

Graham Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 TTh 1 1 -12:50 



images in Meso-American religion and Mexi- 
can popular religiosity in dialogue with West- 
ern classical and feminist theologies. 
Riebe-Estrella M 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 



III. Topics in Theology 

CTS TEC 306 

African American Religion, Theology, and 

Spirituality 

Course will explore the religious beliefs of Af- 
rican Americans, with attention to the spirit of 
accommodation that has inspired works of free- 
dom and justice. Topics: retention of African re- 
ligions and symbols, the black church, nation- 
alism, Afrocentrism. 
Butler W 2-5 Spring 

CTS TEC 413 

Body Theology 

How has Christianity come to be associated with 
the denigration of the body? What are the re- 
sources in the Christian tradition for a theologi- 
cal reappropriation and celebration of the body? 
Jennings/Terrell W 9-12 Spring 

CTS TEC 430 

Theology and Medicine 

Explores the separate and coordinated roles of 
ministers and physicians in caring for the ill and 
injured in such areas as physical and mental suf- 
fering, spiritual needs of patients, prayer for 
healing, and medical ethics. 
Busby T 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTS TEC 484 

Theological and Ethical Perspectives on 
AIDS and Violence 

In this course we examine theological and ethi- 
cal perspectives on the pandemics of AIDS and 
violence as they affect policy and theology and 
ask, How may historical doctrines be freshly in- 
terpreted in order to mediate a humane response? 
Terrell T 2-5 Spring 



CTU CD 456 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity 

This course explores the meaning behind God 



CTU D435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning 

origins, evil, and finality. This course focuses 

principally on the Christian tradition with only 

occasional references to similar themes in world 

religions. 

Hayes MW 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU D436 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 

A study of the notion of myth, mythic conscious- 
ness, and the way myths are used in the Bible 
and in various cultures to express the origin of 
the world and humankind, the origin of evil, and 
the individual and collective end. 
Schreiter MW 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU D545 

Issues in Ecclesiology 

This seminar will examine pertinent contempo- 
rary issues facing the Church today. Some of 
these are inculturation, communio, the nature 
and mission of the Church, the role of women, 
and the hierarchy. 
Phelps T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU DC 446 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

This course will examine critically the theo- 
logical and biblical foundations of the mission- 
ary nature of the church and major challenges 
concerning that issue today, e.g., inculturation, 
evangelization, social justice, and prophetic 
witness. 
Phelps TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

GETS 21-646 

Gender and Redemption in Christian 

Theological History 

This course will trace and analyze the changing 
paradigms of gender in relation to the under- 
standing of redemption from Augustine to the 
early 20th century. 
Ruether TTh 9-10:50 Spring 



99 



Theological Studies 

GETS 21-647 

Third World Feminist Theology 

Emerging feminist theologies in Latin America, 
Asia, Africa. Study of social and historical back- 
ground for emergence of these theologies, pro- 
viding context for liberation and enculturation 
themes. Theological focus on anthropology, sin, 
and redemption. 
Ruether Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 21-648 

Black Theology and Womanist Theology 

Critical conversations between black theology 
and womanist theology; their histories, common- 
alities, differences, joint project possibilities. 
Can such a dialogical enterprise be a paradigm 
for all types of God-talk? 
Thomas/ Hopkins T 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-437H 
Teologia protestante 

Este curso le proveera al estudiante la 

oportunidad de familiarizarse con la reflexion 

teologica caracteristica del pensamiento 

protestante desde fines del siglo 19 hasta el 

presente. 

Rodriguez M 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-576 

Christian Faith and the Scientific 

Worldview 

Attention is given to the impact of the scientific 
worldview on Christian faith, and how this af- 
fects the teaching and preaching task of the 
church. 
Hefner Th 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-604 

Graduate Theological Seminar: Issues and 

Options 

For graduate students in theology. Will focus on 
the essential issues that Christian theology must 
deal with today and assess the ways in which 
various schools of thought are dealing with these 
issues. P 
West he lie T 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-672 

Advanced Religion and Science Seminar 

This seminar includes both faculty and students 
and deals each year with a specific area within 



the field of religion and science. (For post- 
M.Div. students. Admission of others by con- 
sent of instructor.) 
Hefner/Gilbert M 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

M/L TS597 

Theological Reflection and Summation 

A seminar to create clear and concise statements 
of each participant's position on a variety of 
theological topics, assess the sources of these 
positions, and project future study. Emphasis on 
coherence and adequacy of theological reflec- 
tion. 
Evison TEA Spring 

MS SY492 

Professing Christ: Divided Christianity 

among the Great Religions 

If one is to be a responsible Catholic today, sound 
ecumenical attitudes and ideas are needed. It is 
equally impossible to be a responsible Chris- 
tian without developing sound attitudes regard- 
ing interreligious dialogue and religious pluralism. 
van Beeck TF 1:15-2:40 Spring 

MTS T-406 

Doctrine of the Holy Spirit 

Course explores what Christian tradition has 
affirmed concerning presence/activity of the 
Holy Spirit; emphasizes life-giving, freedom, 
empowerment, inspiration attributed to the 
Spirit; presents rich variety of perspectives on 
the Spirit's work. 
Case-Winters M 1-3:50 Spring 

MTS T-510 

Seminar: Believing in God 

What does it mean to believe in God? Seminar 
explores experiences of God and teachings about 
God in Christian community. Attention to ways 
teachings reflect faith experiences and are chal- 
lenged by other positions. Prereq: T-300 or 
equiv. L 
Parker W 2-4:50 Spring 

NBTS IN311H 

Evangeiizacion, salvacion, y justicia 
Examen de realidades y temas contextuales 
sobre la interrelaci6n entre evangelizaci6n, 
salvacion, y justicia. Consideracion de la 
interaction de los estudios biblicos, historicos, 



100 



Ethical Studies 



teologicos y de correlacion, y su influencia en 

la formacion ministerial. 

Mottesi TBA, intensive Spring 

NBTS TH420 
Theology in Context 

This course will examine the ways sociocultural 
environments shape theological and biblical 
understanding in the community of faith. 
Sharp W 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

NBTS TH421 

The Minister as Theologian 

Course examines ways in which the minister 
engages in theologizing in the context of minis- 
try and ways in which ministry supports and 
gives expression to theology. Attention to mat- 
ters related to convergence of theological method 
and ministry practice. 
Sharp W 9:30-12:10 Spring 

SCUPE B-TH302 

Urban Principalities and the Spirit of the City 

Drawing from recent theological work on the 
biblical language of power, this course will seek 
to understand the city, its systems, and its min- 
istries by understanding the "principalities and 
powers." 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 43. 
Wylie Kellermann Spring 

Classes: Mar. 6-7, 19-21 
Experiential learning: Mar. 9-18 

Ethical Studies 

I. Moral Theology 

CTU E375s 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

(For course description see Winter.) 
Pawlikowski TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

LSTC E-437 

Evil and Suffering in the Christian 

Tradition: A Multicultural Perspective 

A critical study of evil and suffering from a 
multicultural perspective challenges the Chris- 
tian faith. This course will examine various con- 
temporary schools of theological expression: 
African American, womanist, American Indian, 
Hispanic, and others. 
Perry TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 



MS CL309 

The Splendor of Truth (Veritatis Splendor) 
Veritatis Splendor is an encyclical of John Paul 
II treating fundamental questions of the church's 
moral teaching, which this course will study, 
along with an in-depth analysis of the method- 
ology employed to determine proper moral be- 
havior. 
Boyle MTh 8:25-9:55 Spring 

MTS E-300s 

Introduction to Contemporary Christian 

Ethics 

(For course description see Winter.) 

Livezey TTh 8-9:50 Spring 

S-WTS 08-604S 
The Moral Life 

Beginning with the model of Aristotle and 
Aquinas and the challenge of Luther, readings 
focus on contemporary issues and understand- 
ings. Attention to the nature of moral percep- 
tion and motivation, moral development, and 
Christian faith and the moral life. 
TBA TTh 1-2:50 Spring 



II. Topics in Ethics 

CTU E481 

Sexual Ethics for the Christian 

A study of sexuality and sexual behavior, espe- 
cially in unmarried Christians. It will investi- 
gate the moral tradition, the elements that form 
a contemporary Christian vision of sexuality, and 
how these relate to sexual conduct. 
Nairn Sa 9-12 Spring 

CTU EC 588 

Seminar on Christ, Community, and 

Christian Ethics 

This course is designed to study the implica- 
tions of Christology for the life of the Christian 
community as an ethical community in an in- 
creasingly secular, scientific, and culturally and 
religiously pluralistic world. 
Fornasari T 10-12:45 Spring 

GETS 22-509 

Theological Ethics in Ministry 

Utilizing a framework of virtue theory, moral 



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Ethical Studies 



perspectives, and use of power, this course will 
offer theological models for developing ethical re- 
lationships that are professionally appropriate in 
contemporary societal and church environments. 
Eugene T 6- 9 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 22-644 
Rich and Poor 

This course on economic ethics examines theologi- 
cal and moral issues of wealth and poverty. It ex- 
plores teachings about money in Scripture, values 
concerning the rich and poor throughout church his- 
tory, and themes of stewardship and business ethics. 
K. Vaux T 6-9 p.m. Spring 

GETS 22/32-643 

Ethical Perspectives on Power, Authority, 

and Abuse 

This course will explore ethical dynamics of 
power, authority, and abuse as related to the 
practice of Christian ministry. Theological and 
ethical perspectives will be engaged, together 
with issues of ministerial identity and integrity. 
Eugene/Poling TTh 9-10:50 Spring 



NPTS THE0 5172 
Medical Ethics 

Explores church's response to selected ethical 
dilemmas: access to health care, abortion, eu- 
thanasia, assisted suicide, decision making, 
congregations as caring communities, AIDS, 
transplants. Hospital ethicists serve as re- 
sources. 2 hours. 

Nelson Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 T 1-5 



Religion and Society 
Studies 

CTS TEC 452 
Engaging the Powers 

This course will examine individual and social 
transformation using the work of Walter Wink 
as its central focus. Issues of race, class, and 
gender will be examined and strategies for 
change explored. 
Cairns W 5:30-8:30 p.m. Spring 



M/L E400 

Religious Leadership and Global Transfor- 
mation 

A study of the principal dynamics shaping the 
"global problematique" of the 21st century and 
the responses by contemporary religious and 
spiritual leaders to fashion global ethics for a 
just, sustainable future. 
Engel/Evison TBA Spring 



GETS 35/22-637 

Religion and the News Media 

Seminary and journalism faculty and students 
examine what is newsworthy in religion and 
what has religious implications in the news. 
Seminar examines religious and ethical dimen- 
sions of public issues through lecture, critical 
readings, case discussion. 
Tholin/McClory Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 



NETS CHTE403H 

Etica social III: Una perspectiva historica 

tercermundista 

Una inquisicion — desde la perspectiva de los 
pobres — de los mas importantes movimientos y 
pensadores etico-sociales cristianos contem- 
poraneos. Prereq: CHTE 402H or permission. 
Mottesi T 2:30-5:10 Spring 

NBTS CHTE404H 

La violencia y la iglesia cristiana 

Un estudio de la teologia de la violencia en las 
Escrituras y en la historia del cristianismo, con 
exploraci6n de las manifestaciones de estas 
teologias en la iglesia actual. 
Horning TBA Spring 



S-WTS 04-550S 
Religion in Literature 

An examination of the way much literature car- 
ries in text or subtext the essential beliefs of 
Christianity. Authors studied: Donne, Herbert, 
Eliot, Greene, West, O'Connor, Murdoch, Spark. 
Some discussion of ways to use literary materi- 
als in sermons. 
TBA W 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

S-WTS 10-60 IS 

Religion, American Society, and Culture 

Through historical and contemporary readings, 
this course seeks to address the question of 
American identity — and in that light to develop 



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World Mission Studies 



constructive understandings of the Christian 

faith and the mission of the church. 

TEA M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

SCUPE S-H303 

Public Issues in Urban Ministry 

In-depth examination of contributions of faith 
communities to social analysis and transforma- 
tion of critical issues affecting quality of life for 
urban residents: welfare reform, racism, poverty, 
urban systems. 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 43. 
McGibbon Spring 

Classes: April 3-4, 16-18 
Experiential learning: April 6-15 

SCUPE S-H304 

For Such a Time as This: An Agenda of 

Hope for the City 

Course held in conjunction with the Congress 
on Urban Ministry, which features nationally 
recognized speakers addressing current issues 
of faith and justice within arenas of politics, 
economics, race, culture. 3 hours. Fees include 
event registration. 
TEA April 20-24 Spring 

SCUPE S-H305 

Restoring Urban Communities 

Introduces principles and practices of church- 
based community development, relationship 
between biblical faith and community develop- 
ment theory and practice. Site visits to effective 
models of community development. 4 hours. 
Fees may apply; see p. 43. 
Lupton Spring 

Classes: May 8-9, 21-23 
Experiential learning: May 11-20 



World Mission Studies 



is followed by concentration on current theologi- 
cal issues in ecumenical mission. Concludes 
with a look at developing trends and emerging 
paradigms. 
Gittins W 1-3:45 Spring 

CTU C512 

Methodology for Applying Sociology and 

Anthropology to Theology 

Key sociological and anthropological methods 
employed in the study of religious experience 
will be examined in order to develop practi- 
cal applications for ongoing theological re- 
search. 
Perry T 1-3:45 Spring 

CTU C546 

African Traditional Religions 

Inculturation depends on understanding and re- 
specting local conditions. This course examines 
major themes and motifs of African religions. 
We consider them as systems and seek a "fit" 
between the gospel and cultures. L 
Gittins Th 10-12:45 Spring 

CTU C560 

Advanced Training for Cross-Cultural 

Ministry 

For those with extensive cross-cultural experi- 
ence. Using rites of passage, liminality, personal 
and social transformation, and global mission 
to develop theory, principles, and process to train 
and become a guide for others. 
Barbour W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU CH325x 

Models of Missionary Activity 

(For course description see Historical Studies 

V.) 

Schroeder MW 1 1:30-12:45 Spring 



CTU BC555x 

Prophecy in Cross-Cultural Perspective: 

Approaches to Old Testament Prophecy 

(For course description see Old Testament III.) 
Okoye W 10-12:45 Spring 

CTU C508 

Mission Trends: Recent Theology 

A historical overview of theologies of mission 



CTU CMP 425 

Empathy in a Cross-Culturai Context 

Explores theoretical and practical difficulties 
and possibilities of empathy as a way of com- 
municating understanding across cultures. Role 
play and case studies will be used to enhance 
the participant's empathic capacity across cul- 
tures. 
Anderson T 1-3:45 Spring 



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World Mission Studies 



CTU CS418 

Native American Spirituality 

Mitakuye oyas 'in means "all my relatives" or 
"I am related to all that is.'" Guided by Lakota 
elders, we will discover relationship of this 
Lakota prayer to ecology, justice, global spiritu- 
ality. Weeklong field trip to South Dakota res- 
ervations offered. 
Barbour M 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU CW511 

Religious Experience of Initiation 

Through a study of Christian initiation and 
Melanesian traditional initiation as religious- 
cultural phenomena, this seminar focuses on the 
theological, cultural, and pastoral issues in the 
holistic process of contextualizing initiation. 
Schroeder T 8:30-1 1:15 Spring 

CTU DC446x 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Phelps TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

MS W0333 

Inculturation, Evangelization, and Hispanic 

Popular Religiosity 

An exploration of the important role the popu- 
lar religion of Hispanics plays in the evangeli- 
zation of these peoples. Includes practical pas- 
toral applications that can lead to successful 
inculturation of our faith in the Hispanic reality. L 
Mendez W 8:25-11:15 Spring 

NPTS MNST5151 

Cultural Dimensions in Missions 

Insights from the social sciences are applied to 
the missionary task of the church. Advocacy and 
contextual ization of the gospel in various cul- 
tural settings. Culture shock, language learning, 
missionary-national relations. 2 hours. 
Weld Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 M 6-10 p.m. 

History of Religions 



instructors and a Buddhist and a Muslim will 
explore the nature of these faiths and seek un- 
derstandings that make possible authentic com- 
munity and shared tasks on behalf of life. 
Thomsen/Vogelaar TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

LSTC W-532 

Encounters and Clashes: Islam and 

Christianity in History 

To understand better the dynamics of Christian- 
Muslim relations, one needs to look at what has 
transpired in the past. This course will examine 
texts that make and mark that path. Discussion 
of them and with Muslims will shape our style 
of learning. 
Vogelaar W 2:30-5:30 Spring 



Ministry Studies 

I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

CTS TEC452x 
Engaging the Powers 

(For course description see Religion and Soci- 
ety Studies.) 
Cairns W 5:30-8:30 p.m. Spring 

GETS 34-630 

Evangelism and Church Growth 

Methods of equipping the local church in evan- 
gelism. Pastoral leadership in motivating and 
involving the laity in evangelism. A critical study 
of the theories of church growth and some mod- 
els of evangelism in relation to it. 
Alphonse TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTC M-422 

Challenges in Rural Ministry 

An examination of common misperceptions of 
small town and farming communities and an 
identification of the distinctive values and cul- 
tural traditions of rural communities. Efforts will 
be made to contextualize pastoral ministry in 
rural congregations. 
Niedenthal T 2:30-5:30 Spring 



LSTC W-424 

Religions in Dialogue: Buddhism, Islam, 

and Christianity 

Interfaith conversations between the Christian 



LSTC M-471 

Introduction to Urban Ministry 

This course will assist the student in develop- 
ing a social ethical framework for responding to 



104 



issues emerging in urban ministry. Some issues 
to be investigated include poverty, environmen- 
tal concerns, homelessness, and racism. 
Perry W 1 -9: 50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-490 
Evangelism 

After a survey of the history of evangelism, this 
course will study programs of evangelism used in a 
variety of ecumenical contexts. Students will con- 
struct their own theology and praxis of evangelism. 
Bliese M 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-500 
Mission Leadership 

This course provides training in specific minis- 
terial skills such as evangelism, stewardship, 
conflict resolution, and ministry in daily life. 
Theological reflection on these skills and on 
modes of leadership in the pastoral office. 
Bliese/Kleingartner Th 2:30-5:30 Spring 

MS PL441 

Critical Issues in Hispanic Ministry 

Diverse Catholic Hispanic communities in the 
U.S., impact of the pluralistic U.S. on Hispan- 
ics, socioeconomic issues, popular religion, the 
appeal of evangelical and Pentecostal religious 
groups, and second- and third-generation His- 
panic Catholics. 
Folliard W 8:25-11:15 Spring 

MS W0333x 

Inculturation, Evangelization, and Hispanic 

Popular Religiosity 

(For course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Mendez W 8:25-11:15 Spring 

MTS M-380 

Urban Ministry Survival Skills 

Course will explore the many skills needed by 
an urban pastor: in areas of self-care, grant writ- 
ing, overseeing physical plant maintenance, 
making community assessments, moderating 
meetings, managing finances. Some site visits. 
Wendorf T 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 

[MTS M-451H 

Seminario de ministerios hispanos 

El curso integra lateoriay practica del ministerio 
en el contexto hispano utilizando tres elementos: 



Ministry Studies 

el entendimiento presente por los participantes 
de la tarea, recursos disponibles, y la 
formulacion personal del ministerio. 
Cassesi M 1-3:50 Spring 

MTS M-466K 

Issues in Ministry for Korean American 

Churches (Taught in Korean) 

This course is offered for those who want to learn 
how to organize and manage a Korean Ameri- 
can church and to develop leadership and spiri- 
tuality in cross-cultural society in the United 
States. 
Lee M 1—3:50 Spring 

NBTS MN330 
Pastoral Leadership 

This course explores the variety of leadership 
styles operative within the local church. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the discernment of per- 
sonality preferences in relation to particular con- 
texts of ministry. 
Nelson T 2:30-5:10 Spring 

NBTS MN419 

The Basics of Church Renewal 

An examination of the issues affecting churches 

today and proposals for transforming churches 

into effective communities of faith for the 21st 

century. 

Clemmons TEA Spring 

NBTS MN540 

Senior Seminar on Pastoral Ministry 

Will aid students in working with pastoral search 
committees to secure a position and also in con- 
ducting such ministry tasks as weddings, funer- 
als, baptisms, the Lord's Supper, budgeting, 
evangelism, conflict management, and building 
the church program. 
Chapman W 2:30-5:10 Spring 



II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

CTS CM 415b 

Prayer as the Heart of Religious 
Leadership: Opening the Heart through 
Centering Prayer 

This course focuses on the practical dimensions 
of prayer and religious leadership using sources 



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Ministry Studies 



within the Christian tradition and contempo- 
rary psychology. Thomas Keating's work is 
used as a model. (Nondivisible 2-quarter 
course.) L 
Cairns W 9-12 Spring 

CTU CS418x 

Native American Spirituality 

(For course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Barbour M 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU S417 

Theology of Religious Life 

This course will examine Christian vocations 
in their specific relationship to the church and 
the world, the charisms proper to religious life, 
celibacy, solitude-community, and the history 
and meaning of commitments. 
Fabiosa TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU S515 
Mendicant Spirituality 

Surveys rise of the mendicant orders in light of 
the movements of poverty and orientation to- 
ward apostolate. Considers new image of the 
church the orders propose; tensions and stabili- 
zation in conventual life; orders' influence on 
Christian spirituality. 
LaChance Th 1-3:45 Spring 

CTU S529s 

History of Spirituality: Trent to Vatican II 

(For course description see Winter.) 

Lescher TBA Spring 

CTU SB480x 

Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

(For course description see Biblical Studies.) 
Bowe MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTU SB 629 

Jewish Mysticism, Messianism, and 

Spirituality 

A study of the development of the mystical sub- 
stratum of Jewish experience from the third pre- 
Christian century to the modern era, including 
Qumran, Messianic movements, and Hasidism. 
The landmark work of Gershom Scholem is care- 
fully examined. L 
Perelmuter W 8:30-11:15 Spring 



CTU WS630x 

Liturgical Foundations of Spirituality 

(For course description see Ministry Studies IV.) 
Ostdiek Th 8:30-11:15 Spring 

M/L 1300s 

Spiritual Journey Workshop 

(For course description see Winter.) 



Gerdes 



T 4-5:30 



Spring 



MTS M-370 

Introduction to Christian Spiritual 

Formation 

Participants will have opportunities to practice 
various disciplines to foster their personal spiri- 
tual formation. Emphasis on connection between 
faith and social justice. Myers-Briggs Tempera- 
ment Inventory will be a tool in determining 
prayer styles. 
Smith F 8-10:50 Spring 

NCTI Seminar II 

(= GETS 40-CTI, MS HI454 and CL454, 
NPTS MNST 6206, S-WTS CTI-98, TEDS 
PT 675) 

Prayer and Life in the Spirit 
Designed to provide an opportunity to explore, 
through study and applied experience, the roots 
and the historical development of theological 
presuppositions underlying spiritual traditions 
in Christianity. Meets at various locations. L 
Weborg et al. Spring 

3 Wednesdays 7-10 p.m. 
+ 2 weekends (April 17-18, 24-25) 

NPTS SPFM5104 

Spiritual Formation: Conflict 

This course will address the dimensions of 
intrapersonal and interpersonal spiritual conflict 
and human conflicts with God. Topics included: 
anger, confession, forgiveness, healing, judg- 
ment, spiritual warfare, and spiritual peace- 
making. One-half hour. 

TBA Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April 30 T 1-3:05 

III. Pastoral Care 

CTS CM 331 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Course seeks to facilitate pastoral formation and 



106 



Ministry Studies 



introduce ministries of pastoral care. Emphasis 
placed upon the minister's healing role with 
people in crisis and the biblical and theological 
foundations of pastoral care. 
Butler T 2-5 Spring 

CTS CM 537 

Seminar: Jungian Analysis 

An examination of current Jungian psychoana- 
lytic theory and practice. L 
Moore/Shanahan M 9-12 Spring 

CTU CMP425x 

Empathy in a Cross-Cultural Context 

(For course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Anderson T 1-3:45 Spring 

CTU MP 408 

Ministry with the Dying and Grieving 

An examination of (1) finitude as a human prob- 
lem, (2) attachment as a human necessity, and (3) 
grief as the inevitable response to a variety of loss 
experiences throughout life, in order to enhance 
our ministering with the dying and the grieving. 
Anderson W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

GETS 32-501s 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hogue TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 32-612 

Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry 

Significance and impact of cultural dynamics of 
persons, groups, and societies in relation to re- 
quirements for effective change. Review of 
student's cultural assumptions, worldview, and 
value system in light of requirements for effec- 
tive ministry. L 
Hinkle Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 32-614 

Introduction to the Psychology of Religion 

Exposes students to quasi-scientific study of 
religious experience and behavior from psycho- 
logical and normative perspectives (biblical and 
theological). Enables students to analyze reli- 
gious experience and behavioral data from vari- 
ous perspectives. 
Rector T 6-9 p.m. Spring 



G-ETS 32-633 

Pastoral Therapy with Groups 

Application of principles of group therapy to 
practice of ministry in monocultural and 
multicultural contexts. 
Hinkle F 9-12 Spring 

LSTC M-320 
Pastoral Care 

Offers opportunities to reflect theologically, cul- 
turally, and psychologically about pastoral care 
situations; to practice pastoral care skills; and 
to explore pastoral identity. Participants must 
be able to make pastoral visits. 
Billman MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

Bill man M 6-9 p.m. Spring 

meets at ELCA, 8765 W. Higgins Rd. 

M/L M330 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

A theoretical and practical introduction to pas- 
toral care. Development of basic skills will be 
combined with critical perspectives on the rela- 
tionship of pastoral care to spirituality, models 
of leadership, and mental health. 
Evison TBA Spring 

MTS M-454 

Pastoral Care: Enabling Partner and 

Couple Communication 

Course designed to assist partners in their com- 
munication with each other. Especially helpful 
for those who live and work closely together. 
Course material is the structured program by 
Couples Communication; $35 fee for materials. 
One-half unit. 
Ashby TBA Spring 

NBTS CTPC402 
Pastoral Care and Aging 

A study of the experience and dynamics of ag- 
ing throughout the life cycle. Emphasis is on 
the development of skills in the pastoral care of 
aging persons. Cross-cultural issues are considered. 
Justes T 1:30-4:10 Spring 

NBTS CTPC405 

Human Sexuality in the Context of Pastoral 

Care 

An examination of the place of human sexual- 



107 



Ministry Studies 

ity in self-fulfillment and self-understanding, 
especially as it relates to the pastoral care min- 
istry of the church. L P 
Justes W 9:30-12:10 Spring 

NPTS MNST6123 
Pastoral Counseling 

A comparative analysis of various approaches 
to pastoral counseling and methods of making 
effective referrals. 1 hour. 
TBA Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April 30 M 8-9:50 



IV. Liturgy and Worship 

CTS CM 308 
Baptism and Eucharist 

An examination of the theology of the sacra- 
ments, particularly as they embody the indi- 
vidual and communal shape of Christian life. 
Edge r ton T 9-12 Spring 

CTU BW466x 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

(For course description see New Testament III.) 
Perelmuter MW 1-2:15 Spring 

CTU BW574x 

Feminist Hermeneutics and Worship 

(For course description see Biblical Studies.) 
Hughes/Osiek Spring 

Apr. 3-4, 24-25, May 15-16 
F 7-9:45 p.m.: Sa 9-4:30 



CTU CW511x 

Religious Experience of Initiation 

(For course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Schroeder T 8:30-11:15 Spring 



CTU MW474 

Lay Leadership of Prayer 

A practicum in the leadership of the 
community's prayer, including Hours, 
catechumenate rites, wake and graveside ser- 
vices, penance services, services of Word and 
Communion, and ministry to the sick. 
Hughes W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 



CTU W455s 

Becoming a Catholic Christian: The Rite of 

Christian Initiation of Adults 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Fragomeni MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU W564 

Seminar in Liturgical History 

This seminar traces the history of the liturgy 
through major watershed events and key per- 
sons and movements. Students will be expected 
to participate actively in research and presenta- 
tions throughout the quarter. 
Francis W 1-3:45 Spring 

CTU WS630 

Liturgical Foundations of Spirituality 

Readings and seminar presentations on struc- 
tures, prayer forms, rhythms, and theology of 
liturgy, to uncover liturgical foundations and 
dimensions of Christian spirituality. Open to 
M.A. and advanced M.Div. students with 
instructor's permission. 
Ostdiek Th 8:30-11:15 Spring 

LSTC M-483 
Alternative Liturgy 

A review of the liturgical materials in the 

Lutheran Book of Worship and With One Voice. 

Alternatives are explored: options suggested by 

the liturgies, substitutions in the spirit of the 

liturgies, and development of other forms and 

texts. 

Banger t MW 1-2:15 Spring 

M/L M367 

Introduction to Arts of Ministry: Rhetoric 

and Ritual 

The nature and function of homiletics, rites, and 

liturgies in the liberal church and in the larger 

community. Effective modes of religious address 

and worship leadership for liberal ministry. 

Maximizing individual gifts in these offices. 

Practicum. 

TBA T 1:30-4 Spring 

MTS M-314 

Understanding the Dynamics of Corporate 

Worship 

Study of the nature of corporate Christian wor- 



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Ministry Studies 



ship from historical, theological, and pastoral 
perspectives. Exploration of what gives integ- 
rity to components of worship, various services, 
observance of Christian year. 
TBA TTh 10-11:50 Spring 

S-WTS 09-608S 
The Liturgical Year 

Exploration of the origins and development of 
Christian feasts and the liturgical calendar and 
of their meaning and practice in the church to- 
day. 
Meyers WF 9-10:50 Spring 



V. Preaching and Communication 

CTS CM 302 
Preaching 

The theology and practice of the preaching min- 
istry. The approach will emphasize both the art 
of sermon preparation and the place of preach- 
ing in pastoral ministry. Limited to second- and 
third-year students. L 

(A) Edge r ton W 9-12 Spring 

(B) Edge r ton Th 9-12 Spring 



CTU MW452 

Preaching Retreats and Parish Missions/ 
Renewals 

Pastoral and theological skills for leaders of re- 
treats and parish missions/renewals. Designing 
and programming such gatherings, as well as 
writing and preaching retreat and renewal con- 
ferences. Prereq: MW 450 or equiv. 
Cornwell Sa 9-4 Spring 

G-ETS 31-501s 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description see Fall.) 
(A)Chatfield TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

(B) Duck WF 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 31-605 

The Uses of Story in Preaching 

Exploration through reading, experimentation, 
and practice preaching of some ways story has 
been and can be used to enhance preaching, such 



as plotted structure, participatory preparation, 
imaged argument, and eventful language. Prereq: 
31-501 or equiv. L 
Chatfield TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTC M-456 

Preaching Matthew's Gospel 

Course begins with study of Matthew's Gospel. 
Emphasis is on the story line. Some of sermons 
to be preached in class will consist of telling 
two to four stories from Matthew as a way of 
hearing texts in biblical context. 
Jensen Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

M/L 1325 
Communication Arts 

Rhetoric and the use of the voice in public speak- 
ing. A half-credit course taught by the artistic 
director of the Court Theatre. 
Rudall TBA Spring 

MTS M-447 

Preaching as Celebration II 

Course is a culturally sensitive treatment of the 
homiletic genius of the black preaching tradi- 
tion. In preaching, practicum students will ex- 
plore how celebration enhances sermonic design 
and delivery. Prereq: introductory level preach- 
ing course. L 
Thomas Th 5-7:50 p.m. Spring 

NBTS ME 302 

Issues in Cross-Cultural Evangelism 

This course focuses on postmodern culture as 

the context for evangelism among Generation 

X of various ethnic groups. Students will be 

equipped to use John's Gospel for friendship 

evangelism. 

Price M 2:30-5:10 Spring 

NPTS MNST5210 
Homiletics 

The student will learn the fundamentals of a 
theology of preaching and how to move from 
text to sermon, how to construct a sermon, and 
how to practice these skills in a laboratory set- 
ting. 2 hours. L 

Noren Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 TTh 8-9:20 



109 



Ministry Studies 
VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

CTS CM 426 

Contemporary Approaches to Religious 

Education 

How do you approach Christian education? 
Should parish educators transmit facts, build a 
faith community, journey developmentally, lib- 
erate the oppressed, or transform persons within 
a culture? Discussion of 6 texts, including 
Westerhoff, Freire, Harris. 
Myers M 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 33-610 

Children and Christian Faith 

How children develop physically, mentally, 
emotionally, morally, and in faith, becoming 
meaningful members of the faith community. 
Child advocacy issues in light of society's atti- 
tudes and policies toward children. Issues, re- 
sources, and methods. 
Olson T 6-9 p.m. Spring 

GETS 33-615 

Adults and Christian Faith 

Ways adults learn; faith issues, lifestyles, and 
resources, and their implications for educational 
approaches of the church to young, middle, and 
older adults. L 
L. Vogel TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTC M-464 

Children's Literature, Short Stories, the 

Movies, and the Bible 

Course will use children's literature, adult short 
stories, and movies in order to raise life issues 
to which the gospel speaks. Students will search 
for a variety of stories that raise such issues for 
use in the church's teaching and preaching min- 
istry. 

Conrad T 2:30-5:30 Spring 

Conrad Th 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

meets at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, St. Charles 

M/L M300 

Introduction to Religious Education 

Introduction to the field of religious education. 
Explores the sociocultural context, historical 



patterns, curricular resources, models of teach- 
ing, and role of leadership in facilitating and 
administering a program of life-span religious 
education. 
Harlow M 2-4:30 Spring 

M/L M306 

Religious Education and the Changing 

Family 

Focuses on changes in North American family 
and implications for religious education. Issues 
examined: needs of nontraditional families, el- 
der households, families with small children; 
adolescent sexuality; domestic violence; and 
congregational support. 
Harlow TBA Spring 



MTS M-443 

Issues of Human Development in the 

Church 

Examines current literature in the theory of adult 
development with focus on differences in the 
development journeys of females and males. 
Connections will be made between theory and 
implications for religious education and pasto- 
ral care with adults. 
Ashby /Caldwell W 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 



MTS M-503 

Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Religious 

Education 

Seminar is designed as a reading course for dis- 
cussion of current texts in religious education 
theory and practice. Nondivisible two-quarter 
course. Prereq: one or two courses in religious 
education. P 
Caldwell W 9-11:50 Spring 

NPTS CEDF 5103 
Psychology of Learning 

Factors related to learning as highlighted in both 
psychology and the Bible will be outlined and 
developed. Major learning theories, learning 
styles, and application of research findings to 
Christian education and formation will be in- 
cluded. 1 hour. 

TBA Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 T 3:15-5:05 



110 



NPTS CEDF6214 

Ministry with Parents of Children 

Focus on competencies needed to help par- 
ents understand aspects of a healthy family, 
parenting styles, children's behavioral styles, 
intervention techniques, faith development, 
special situations (immigrant, ministry, and 
blended families). 

TBA Spring Semester, Quad B 

2 Saturdays April 4, 18 TBA 



NPTS CEDF6219 

Youth Issues and Problems 

The culture and challenges of today's ado- 
lescents and specific problems encountered 
by many (such as body image, eating dis- 
orders, depression, drugs and alcohol) wiH 
form the subject matter of this seminar. 1 
hour. 

TBA Spring Semester, Quad B 

Mar. 16-April30 T 6:20-8:10 p.m. 



Ministry Studies 

VII. Polity and Canon Law 

CTS CH367x 

History and Polity of the United Church of 

Christ 

(For course description see Historical Studies II.) 
Bueschel Th 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU MW421s 
Church and Structure 

(For course description see Fall.) 

TBA MW 1-2:15 Spring 

G-ETS 40-674 

United Methodist Studies: Wesley/19th 

Century 

The foundational contribution of John Wesley 
to the history, doctrine, and polity of emerging 
Methodism. The United Methodist tradition in 
the U.S. through the 19th century with atten- 
tion to roles of women, blacks, Asians, and Na- 
tive Americans. 5 hours. 
TBA TTh 9-10:50 Spring 



111 



SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST 
WITHIN COURSES OF STUDY 



This section lists courses in nine special areas of interest in the theological curriculum 
with page references for locating full course descriptions. 



African American Studies 



Fall 

CTS CM 305 
CTS TEC 437 
CTU DC 576f 
G-ETS 21-630 
MTS M-428 
NBTS CH360 

Winter 

CTS CM 335 
CTS TEC 434 
CTS TEC 504 
CTU D 568 
CTU DCS 575 
MTS M-323 
NBTS TH432 

Spring 

CTS TEC 306 
CTS TEC 484 
CTU C 546 
G-ETS 21-648 
MTS H-330 
MTS M-447 



Preaching from an African American Perspective, p. 65 

The Psychology of the Oppressed and Liberation Theologies, p. 54 

Black Theology in Dialogue, p. 50 

Black Theology, p. 53 

Prayer Tradition in the African American Tradition, p. 61 

History of the African American Religious Experience in America, p. 51 

African American Pastoral Psychology, p. 86 

Womanist Ethics, p. 81 

Augustine, Niebuhr, and Malcolm X, p. 77 

Womanist Theology in Dialogue, p. 79 

Black Spirituality, p. 86 

Domestic Violence, Pastoral Care, and the Church, p. 87 

Theological Concepts in the Literature of African American Experience, p. 78 

African American Religion, Theology, and Spirituality, p. 99 

Theological and Ethical Perspectives on AIDS and Violence, p. 99 

African Traditional Religions, p. 103 

Black Theology and Womanist Theology, p. 1 00 

History of the Black Church in North America, p. 97 

Preaching as Celebration II, p. 109 



Asian Studies 

Fall 

CTU CH 525 
MTS M-349K 

Winter 

G-ETS 34-676 
MTS M-350K 

Spring 

MTS M-466K 



Early Christianity in Asia, p. 58 

Transformation through Care: Evangelism and Membership Care (Taught in Korean), p. 63 

Chicago — An Asian Immersion Experience, p. 84 

Korean Ministries in North American Contexts (Taught in Korean), p. 85 

Issues in Ministry for Korean American Churches (Taught in Korean), p. 105 



12 



Cross-Cultural Studies 



Fall 

CCGM 
CTU C410 
CTU C 460f 
CTU C 575f 
CTU CMP 541 
CTU DC 442 
CTU EC 402 
G-ETS 21-500f 
G-ETS 32-620 
G-ETS 34-634 
G-ETS 40-675 
LSTC T-301 
LSTC W-529 
TEDS ME 641 

Winter 

CTS TEC 496 
CTU C 460w 
CTU C 575w 
CTU C 594 
CTU DC 441 
CTU DC 448 
CTU DC 610 
G-ETS 34-676 
G-ETS 40-647 
LSTC W-530 
LSTC W-531 
MS PL374 
NBTS CT310 
SCUPE M 304 

Winter-Spring 

CTS TEC 390 

Spring 

CTU C 508 
CTU C 546 
CTU C 560 
CTU CD 456 
CTU CH 325 
CTU CMP 425 
CTU CS418 
CTU CW511 
CTU DC 446 
G-ETS 12-619 
G-ETS 21 -500s 
G-ETS 32-612 
G-ETS 32-633 
LSTC E-437 
NBTS ME 302 



1997 Cross-Cultural Quarter (CTU/LSTC/MTS W-414), p. 58 

Mission: The Contemporary Challenge, p. 58 

Training for Cross-Cultural Mission and Ministry, p. 58 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 58 

Marriage and Family in Cross-Cultural Context, p. 62 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry, p. 54 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics, p. 56 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary Theology, p. 52 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling, p. 63 

Introduction to Missiology, p. 58 

Pastoral Effectiveness in a Multicultural Context, p. 59 

Unity and Diversity, p. 52 

Jesus and Muhammad in History and in Faith: Rumor and Reality, p. 59 

Missionary Anthropology and Sociology, p. 59 



Good and Evil, p. 78 

Training for Cross-Cultural Mission and Ministry, p. 58 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 58 

Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuses, p. 83 

Christology and Cultures, p. 79 

Marian Theology, Symbols, and Inculturation, p. 79 

Theological Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Perspective, p. 79 

Chicago — An Asian Immersion Experience, p. 84 

Anthropology of Religion, p. 82 

History of the Development of Religious Thought in Islam, p. 83 

The Bible and the Qur'an, p. 84 

Race and Pastoral Practice, p. 87 

Church and Society: A Cross-Cultural Approach, p. 82 

Christology and Culture, p. 80 



Mission across Cultures, p. 83 



Mission Trends: Recent Theology, p. 103 

African Traditional Religions, p. 1 03 

Advanced Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 1 03 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity, p. 99 

Models of Missionary Activity, p. 97 

Empathy in a Cross-Cultural Context, p. 103 

Native American Spirituality, p. 104 

Religious Experience of Initiation, p. 104 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church, p. 99 

New Testament Interpretation through Cross-Cultural Eyes, p. 95 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary Theology, p. 52 

Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry, p. 107 

Pastoral Therapy with Groups, p. 107 

Evil and Suffering in the Christian Tradition: A Multicultural Perspective, p. 101 

Issues in Cross-Cultural Evangelism, p. 109 



113 



Hispanic Studies 

Fall 



MTS B-472H 
MTS M-330 
MTS T-437H 
NBTS BL350L 
NBTS CHTE401H 
NBTS CN301H 
NBTS ED321H 
NBTS IN301H 
NBTS OT302H 
NBTS PC403H 

Winter 

CTU CD 465 
LSTC T-461H 
MTS H-422 
MTS M-453H 
NBTS BL471H 
NBTS CHTE402H 
NBTS NT308H 
NBTS OT305H 
NBTS TH302H 

Spring 

CTU CD 456 
LSTC T-437H 
MS PL441 
MS W0333 
MTS H-485H 
MTS M-451H 
NBTS CHTE403H 
NBTS CHTE404H 
NBTS IN311H 
NBTS NT404H 



Las cartas pastorales, p. 48 

Introduction to the Hispanic Church and Community, p. 60 

Temas de lateologiahispanaen Estados Unidos, p. 55 

New Testament Greek I, p. 49 

Etica social I: Una perspectiva historicatercermundista, p. 57 

Teorias de la personalidad en el contexto hispano, p. 63 

Jesus, el Maestro, p. 67 

Fe, teologia, y religi6n desde el reverso de la historia, p. 53 

Los profetas anteriores, p. 45 

Consejo Pre- y Neo-Marital, p. 64 



Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church, p. 83 

La fe que confesamos, p. 77 

Reformation in Spanish-Speaking Lands, p. 75 

Ministerio hispano y desarrollo congregacional, p. 85 

Exegesis biblica: Hebreos, p. 73 

Etica social II: Una perspectiva historicatercermundista, p. 81 

Lectura criticade Colosenses y Efesios, p. 72 

Los profetas menores, p. 70 

Teologia contextual: Una perspectiva praxeol6gica, p. 77 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity, p. 99 

Teologia protestante, p. 1 00 

Critical Issues in Hispanic Ministry, p. 105 

Inculturation, Evangelization, and Hispanic Popular Religiosity, p. 104 

Historia de la iglesia hispana en los E.E.U.U., p. 97 

Seminario de ministerios hispanos, p. 105 

Etica social III: Una perspectiva hist6ricatercermundista, p. 102 

La violencia y la iglesia cristiana, p. 1 02 

Evangel izaci6n, salvacidn, yjusticia, p. 100 

El Evangelio de Juan, p. 95 



Judaic Studies 



Fall 

CTU B 525 
CTU BW 465 
G-ETS 21-642 

Winter 

CTU E 432 

Spring 

CTS CH403 
CTU BW466 
CTU SB 629 
G-ETS 21-643 



Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus' Jewish Background, p. 48 
Liturgy of the Synagogue I, p. 48 
Judaism in the Early Christian Period, p. 53 



Ethical Implications of the Holocaust/Genocide, p. 81 



Apocalyptic Literature in Judaism and Christianity, p. 93 
Liturgy of the Synagogue II, p. 95 
Jewish Mysticism, Messianism, and Spirituality, p. 106 
Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought, p. 98 



114 



Studies in Eco-Justice 



Fall 

CTU E 590 
M/L E439 
M/L M358 

Spring 

CTU CS418 
LSTC M-471 
M/L E400 



Sustaining Life: Ethical Challenges, p. 56 

Ecology, Religion, Ethics, p. 57 

Field Education for Eco-Justice Ministry, p. 60 



Native American Spirituality, p. 1 04 

Introduction to Urban Ministry, p. 104 

Religious Leadership and Global Transformation, p. 102 



Urban and Public Policy Studies 



Fall 

M/L E338f 
MTS M-371 

Winter 

CTU EC 425 
CTU EC 545 
G-ETS 22-504 
M/L M366 
MTS E/M-301 
NBTS URTH405 
SCUPE M 304 
SCUPE M305 

Spring 

LSTC M-471 
MTS M-380 
S-WTS 10-60 IS 
SCUPE B-TH302 
SCUPE S-H303 
SCUPE S-H304 
SCUPE S-H305 



Democratic Public Theology and Ethics, p. 56 
Making a Church Grow: Urban Evangelism, p. 60 



World Poverty, Development, and Life's Liberation, p. 82 
Seminar on Pol itics and Christian Conscience, p. 8 1 
Church and Community, p. 82 
Introduction to Arts of Ministry : Public Ministry, p. 84 
Introduction to Public Ministry, p. 8 1 
Toward a Theology of Urban Ministry, p. 79 
Christology and Culture, p. 80 
Dimensions and Dynamics of Ministry, p. 85 



Introduction to Urban Ministry, p. 104 

Urban Ministry Survival Skills, p. 105 

Religion, American Society, and Culture, p. 102 

Urban Principalities and the Spirit of the City, p. 101 

Public Issues in Urban Ministry, p. 103 

For Such a Time as This: An Agenda of Hope for the City, p. 103 

Restoring Urban Communities, p. 103 



Women's Studies 



Fall 

G-ETS 32-643 
M/L E338f 

Winter 

CTS TEC 434 
CTU D 568 
CTU S 524 
G-ETS 31-607 

Spring 

CTU BW 574 
G-ETS 21-647 
G-ETS 21-648 
LSTC H-468 



The Psychology of Sin and Transformation in Feminist Theologies, p. 63 
Democratic Public Theology and Ethics, p. 56 



Womanist Ethics, p. 8 1 

Womanist Theology in Dialogue, p. 79 

Women's Spirituality, p. 86 

Gender, Language, and Worship, p. 89 



Feminist Hermeneutics and Worship, p. 92 

Third World Feminist Theology, p. 100 

Black Theology and Womanist Theology, p. 1 00 

The Woman Problem in the History of Christian Theology, p. 97 



115 



Chicago Center for Global Ministries 

The courses listed are offered by the three cooperating schools of CCGM; see pp. 21-22. 



Fall 

CCGM 
CTU B 525 
CTU BC 490 
CTU C410 
CTU C 460f 
CTU C 575f 
CTU CH 525 
CTU CMP 541 
CTU CS 400 
CTU DC 442 
CTU DC 576f 
CTU EC 402 
CTU I 607 
LSTC M-370f 
LSTC W-428 
LSTC W-453 
LSTC W-529 
MTS H-300f 
MTS H-421 
MTS M-330 
MTS M-371 
MTS M-428 
MTS T-437H 

Winter 

CTU C 460w 
CTU C 575w 
CTU C 594 
CTU CD 465 
CTU CH424 
CTU D 568 
CTU DC 441 
CTU DC 448 
CTU DC 576w 
CTU DC 610 
CTU DCS 575 
CTU E 375w 
CTU E432 
CTU EC 425 
CTU EC 545 
CTU EC 570 
LSTC M-370w 
LSTC T-461H 
LSTC W-432 
LSTC W-530 
LSTC W-531 
MTS E/M-301 
MTS H-422 
MTS M-453H 
MTS T-415 



1997 Cross-Cultural Quarter (CTU/LSTC/MTS W-414), p. 58 

Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus' Jewish Background, p. 48 

Biblical Foundations for Mission, p. 57 

Mission: The Contemporary Challenge, p. 58 

Training for Cross-Cultural Mission and Ministry, p. 58 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 58 

Early Christianity in Asia, p. 58 

Marriage and Family in Cross-Cultural Context, p. 62 

Discovering Global Spirituality, p. 58 

Christology for Mission and PastoralMinistry, p. 58 

Black Theology in Dialogue, p. 50 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics, p. 56 

Alternative Social Orders, p. 57 

Introduction to Public Ministry, p. 57 

Toward Understanding Islam, p. 59 

The Finality of Jesus and Religious Pluralism, p. 59 

Jesus and Muhammad in History and in Faith: Rumor and Reality, p. 59 

Transformations of Christianity: A Foundational Course, p. 50 

20th-century Christianity: Global Pentecostal ism, p. 51 

Introduction to the Hispanic Church and Community, p. 60 

Making a Church Grow: Urban Evangelism, p. 60 

Prayer Tradition in the African American Tradition, p. 61 

Temas de lateologiahispanaen Estados Unidos, p. 55 



Training for Cross-Cultural Mission and Ministry, p. 58 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 58 

Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuses, p. 83 

Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church, p. 83 

Sub-Saharan African History, p. 75 

Womanist Theology in Dialogue, p. 79 

Christology and Cultures, p. 79 

Marian Theology, Symbols, and Inculturation, p. 79 

Black Theology in Dialogue, p. 50 

Theological Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Perspective, p. 79 

Black Spirituality, p. 86 

Introduction to Social Ethics, p. 80 

Ethical Implications of the Holocaust/Genocide, p. 81 

World Poverty, Development, and Life's Liberation, p. 82 

Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience, p. 81 

Revolution/Liberation: Ethical Perspectives, p. 81 

Introduction to Public Ministry, p. 57 

La fe que confesamos, p. 77 

World Religions and the Christian Mission, p. 83 

History of the Development of Religious Thought in Islam, p. 83 

The Bible and the Qur'an, p. 84 

Introduction to Public Ministry, p. 81 

Reformation in Spanish-Speaking Lands, p. 75 

Ministerio hispano y desarrollo congregacional, p. 85 

Between Hospitality and Hostility: Theological Issues of Immigration, p. 79 



116 



Spring 

CTU BC 555 Prophecy in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Approaches to Old Testament Prophecy, p. 93 

CTU C 508 Mission Trends: Recent Theology, p. 1 03 

CTU C 5 1 2 Methodology for Applying Sociology and Anthropology to Theology, p. 1 03 

CTU C 546 African Traditional Religions, p. 1 03 

CTU C 560 Advanced Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 1 03 

CTU CD 456 God Images in Hispanic Religiosity, p. 99 

CTU CH 325 Models of Missionary Activity, p. 97 

CTU CS 4 1 8 Native American Spirituality, p. 1 04 

CTU CW 5 1 1 Religious Experience of Initiation, p. 1 04 

CTU D 436 Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness, p. 99 

CTU DC 446 Missionary Dynamics of the Church, p. 99 

CTU E 375s Introduction to Social Ethics, p. 80 

CTU EC 588 Seminar on Christ, Community, and Christian Ethics, p. 101 

CTU SB 629 Jewish Mysticism, Messianism, and Spirituality, p. 106 

LSTC H-468 The Woman Problem in the History of Christian Theology, p. 97 

LSTC M-47 1 Introduction to Urban Ministry, p. 1 04 

LSTC M-490 Evangelism, p. 105 

LSTC M-500 Mission Leadership, p. 105 

LSTC T-437H Teologia protestante, p. 1 00 

LSTC T-576 Christian Faith and the Scientific Worldview, p. 100 

LSTC W-424 Religions in Dialogue: Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity, p. 1 04 

LSTC W-532 Encounters and Clashes: Islam and Christianity in History, p. 1 04 

MTS H-300s Transformations of Christianity: A Foundational Course, p. 50 

MTS H-330 History of the Black Church in North America, p. 97 

MTS H-423 American Christianity and Modernity, p. 97 

MTS H-485H Historia de la iglesia hispana en Ios E.E.U.U., p. 97 

MTS M-380 Urban Ministry Survival Skills, p. 105 

MTS M-45 1 H Seminario de ministerios hispanos, p. 1 05 

MTS M-466K Issues in Ministry for Korean American Churches (Taught in Korean), p. 1 05 



117 



EVENING/WEEKEND 
AND INTENSIVE COURSES 

This section lists courses in two categories: those that meet in the evenings or on weekends 
and those that meet intensively for only part of the regular term (this includes some week- 
end courses). Intensive courses have extended class meetings on the days scheduled, in- 
cluding in most cases weekday meeting times. 

Courses are listed according to the classification system used in the Courses section 
(pp. 44—1 1 1). For convenience in using these indexes, the outline is given below, along with 
the abbreviations for each division. The page references indicate the beginning of each divi- 
sion or subdivision. 



Biblical Studies 
Old Testament (OT) 
I. Introductory 
II. Canonical Corpus 

III. Topics in Old Testament 

IV. Hebrew Language 
New Testament (NT) 

I. Introductory 
II. Books of the New Testament 

III. Topics in New Testament 

IV. New Testament Greek 
Historical Studies (HS) 

I. Introductory 
II. History of Particular Traditions 

III. History — Individuals 

IV. American Church History 
V. Topics in Church History 

Theological Studies (TS) 

I. Introductory and Foundational 
II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

III. Topics in Theology 
Ethical Studies (ES) 

I. Moral Theology 
II. Topics in Ethics 
Religion and Society Studies 
World Mission Studies 
History of Religions 
Ministry Studies (MS) 

I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 
II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 
HI. Pastoral Care 

IV. Liturgy and Worship 

V. Preaching and Communication 
VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 
VII. Polity and Canon Law 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


44 


69 


92 


44 


69 


92 


45 


69 


92 


46 


70 


93 


46 


71 


94 


47 


71 


94 


47 


72 


94 


48 


73 


95 


49 


73 


96 


49 


74 


96 


50 


75 


96 


— 


76 


97 


51 


76 


97 


51 


76 


97 


52 


76 


98 


53 


77 


98 


54 


78 


99 


56 


80 


101 


56 


81 


101 


57 


82 


102 


57 


83 


103 


59 


83 


104 


59 


84 


104 


61 


85 


105 


62 


86 


106 


64 


88 


108 


65 


89 


109 


66 


90 


110 


68 


91 


111 



118 



Evening/Weekend Courses 



Fall Quarter and Fall Semester 

Biblical Studies 

LSTC B-333 

LSTC B-443 

MTS B/E-460 
OT I. Introductory 

CTS CH301 

LSTC B-311A 

NBTS OT301 

NPTS BIBL6120 
OT II. Canonical Corpus 

NBTS OT304 

NBTS OT417 

NBTS OT463 

NPTS BIBL 6220 
OT III. Topics in Old Testament 

CTU B415 
NT I. Introductory 

G-ETS 12-50 If 

LSTC B-331f 

LSTC B-332 

NPTS BIBL5151f 
NT II. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B 440 

MTS B-472H 

NPTS BIBL 5165 
NT III. Topics in New Testament 

G-ETS 12-613 
HS I. Introductory 

CTU H307 

G-ETS 13-503f 

LSTC H-310 
HS II. History of Particular Traditions 

CTU DC 576f 

MTS H-421 
HS TV. American Church History 

NBTS CH360 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

LSTC T-311 
TS II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

G-ETS 21-612 

LSTC T-602 
TS III. Topics in Theology 

G-ETS 21-638 

NBTS TH470 

NCTI Seminar I 
ES I. Moral Theology 

CTS TEC 321 

CTU E370f 
ES II. Topics in Ethics 

G-ETS 22-503 

G-ETS 22-507 



Religion and Society Studies 

CTU I 607 

G-ETS 35-634 

NBTS CT303 
World Mission Studies 

CTU C460f 

CTU C 575f 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

CTS CM 464 

G-ETS 40-675 

MTS M-371 

NPTS MNST 7375 

TEDS PT731 
MS II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

CTU S410 

NBTS IN 310 

NBTS MN412 

NPTS MNST 7306 
MS HI. Pastoral Care 

G-ETS 32-50 If 

NBTS CN301H 

NPTS MNST 5125 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship 

CTU W 537 

G-ETS 31-51 If 
MS V. Preaching and Communication 

CTS CM 305 

G-ETS 31-501f 

NPTS MNST 6220 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-506 

G-ETS 33-643 

LSTC M-360 

NBTS ED321H 

NPTS CEDF6211 

NPTS CEDF6213 

NPTS CEDF6217 
MS VII. Polity and Canon Law 

S-WTS 13-505S 

Winter Quarter, Spring Semester, and 
Spring Quad A 

OT I. Introductory 

CTU B300w 

G-ETS ll-511w 

LSTC B-310w 

LSTC B-311 

NPTS BIBL 5149 
OT II. Canonical Corpus 

G-ETS 11 -60 IB 

NBTS OT302 

NBTS OT305H 



119 



OT II. Canonical Corpus 

G-ETS 11 -60 IB 

NBTS OT302 

NBTS OT305H 
OT III. Topics in Old Testament 

LSTC B-502 
NT II. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B432 
NT III. Topics in New Testament 

NPTS B1BL 6225 
HS I. Introductory 

LSTC H-330 
HS V. Topics in Church History 

LSTC H-460 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

G-ETS 21-501w 

G-ETS 21-502w 

LSTC T-312 
TS II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

LSTC T-436/NPTSTHEO-174 

NBTS TH432 

S-WTS 05-655S 
TS III. Topics in Theology 

CTU D568 

CTU DC 441 

LSTC T-456 

LSTC T-603 

NBTS URTH405 
ES I. Moral Theology 

CTU E375w 

LSTC E-512 

MTS E-300w 
ES II. Topics in Ethics 

CTU E444 

CTU EC 570 

G-ETS 22-643 

NPTS THEO 6275 
Religion and Society Studies 

G-ETS 40-647 
World Mission Studies 

CTS TEC 390 

CTU C 460w 

CTU C 575w 

CTU C 594 

CTU CD 465 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

CTS TEC 447 

CTU MP 533 

MTS M-437 
MS II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

CTU S 524 

CTU S 540 
MS III. Pastoral Care 

G-ETS 32-50 lw 

G-ETS 32-617 



MTS M-310 

MTS M-323 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship 

CTU W350w 

G-ETS 31-51 lw 

G-ETS 31-635 

LSTC M-380 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-611 

LSTC M-460 

NPTS CEDF6212 

NPTS CEDF6218 
MS VII. Polity and Canon Law 

CTU MW422 

MTS M-307 

Spring Quarter amd Spring Quad B 

Biblical Studies 

CTU BW 574 
OTI. Introductory 

LSTC B-313 
OT II. Canonical Corpus 

G-ETS 11-603 

NBTS OT303 

NPTS BIBL5142 
OT III. Topics in Old Testament 

LSTC B-516 

NBTS OT515 
NT I. Introductory 

CTU B305s 

G-ETS 12-502s 

NBTS NT 302 
NT II. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B430 

CTU B453 

LSTC B-470 

LSTC B-548 

MTS B-438 

NBTS NT404H 
HSI. Introductory 

G-ETS 13-502s 

MTS H-300s 
HS II. History of Particular Traditions 

CTS CH367 

LSTC H-360 

MTS H-330 
HS III. History— Individuals 

NPTS HIST 5135 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

G-ETS 21 -500s 

LSTC T-313 

MTS T-300s 
TS II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

LSTC T-529 



120 



TS III. Topics in Theology 

CTS TEC 430 

CTU CD 456 

CTU D545 

G-ETS 21-647 

G-ETS 21-648 

LSTC T-437H 

LSTC T-576 

LSTC T-604 

LSTC T-672 

NBTS TH420 
ES II. Topics in Ethics 

CTU E481 

G-ETS 22-509 

G-ETS 22-644 
Religion and Society Studies 

CTS TEC 452 

G-ETS 35/22-637 

S-WTS 04-550S 

S-WTS 10-60 IS 
World Mission Studies 

CTU C 560 

CTU CS418 

NPTS MNST5151 



MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

LSTC M-471 

LSTC M-490 

MTS M-380 
MS II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

NCTI Seminar II 
MS III. Pastoral Care 

CTU MP 408 

G-ETS 32-614 

LSTC M-320 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship 

CTU MW474 

CTU W455s 
MS V. Preaching and Communication 

G-ETS 3 1-50 Is 

LSTC M-456 

MTS M-447 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-610 

LSTC M-464 

MTS M-443 

NPTS CEDF6214 

NPTS CEDF6219 



121 



Intensive Courses 



Fall 

OT IV. Hebrew Language 

LSTC B-300 

MTS B-321 
NT I. Introductory 

LSTC B-331f 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

LSTC T-301 

NBTS IN301H 
World Mission Studies 

CTU/LSTC/MTS W-414 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

NPTS CEDF6213 



Winter 

OT I. Introductory 

LSTC B-310w 
OT III. Topics in Old Testament 

G-ETS 11/12-630 
OT IV. Hebrew Language 

G-ETS 11-641 
NT II. Books of the New Testament 

NBTS NT 308H 
NT III. Topics in New Testament 

G-ETS 12-606 
HS I. Introductory 

G-ETS 13-502w 
HS V. Topics in Church History 

LSTC H-460 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

NBTS TH302 

NBTS TH302H 

NBTS TH401 



TS III. Topics in Theology 

SCUPE M 304 
Religion and Society Studies 

G-ETS 22-504 

NBTS CT310 
World Mission Studies 

CTS TEC 390 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

CTU MP 533 

G-ETS 34-676 

M/L M308w 

M/L M413w 

MTS M-437 

SCUPE M305 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship 

M/L M314w 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-635 

M/L M415w 



Spring 

Biblical Studies 

CTU BW 574 
TS III. Topics in Theology 

NBTS IN311H 
Religion and Society Studies 

SCUPE S-H303 

SCUPE S-H304 

SCUPE S-H305 



122 



ACTS PERSONNEL 



Faculty and Executive Officers 



Ghulam-Haider Aasi (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Islamic Studies 
Th.D., Temple University 
773-281-4700 

Martin P. Alphonse (G-ETS) E. Stanley Jones 
Professor of Evangelism 

B.A., Madurai University, India; M.A., Madras 
University, India; M.Div., Union Biblical 
Seminary, India; Th.M, Ph.D., Fuller Theological 
Seminary 
847-866-3938 

Carol M. Amadio (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Canon Law 

B.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; M.S.W., 
Loyola University School of Social Work, Chicago; 
M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; J.D., 
Loyola University School of Law, Chicago; L.L.M., 
Illinois Institute of Technology 
630-830-5321 

Herbert Anderson (CTU) Professor of Pastoral 
Theology 

B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; B.D., Augustana 
Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University 

773-753-5327 

Philip J. Anderson (NPTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Phil., Regent's Park 
College, Oxford University 
773-244-62 1 8 panders@northpark.edu 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) W. Clement and Jessie 
V Stone Professor of Pastoral Care; Dean of 
Masters Programs 

B.A., Princeton University; M.Th., D.Min., 
University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 
773-947-6333 

Richard E.Averbeck (TEDS) Associate Professor 
of Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., Calvary Bible College; M.Div., M.A., Grace 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Annenberg Research 
Institute, Dropsie College 
847-317-8017 



Donald A. Baker (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary 
847-866-7025 BakerEV02@aol.com 

Dori L. Baker (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., University of South Florida; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University 

Mark P. Bangert (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Worship and Music 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., S.T.M., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota; study: Indiana University; 
Northwestern University; St. John's University 
773-256-0770 mbangert@lstc.edu 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) Professor of World 
Mission 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; S.T.D., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

773-753-5330 

Paula S. Datsko Barker (S-WTS) Associate 
Professor of Historical Theology 
B.Mus., University of Michigan; M.Div., Yale 
Divinity School; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
847-328-9300 

Robert Barron (MS) Department ofSystematics 
S.T.B., S.T.L., M.Div., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.A., Catholic University of America; S.T.D., 
Institut Catholique de Paris 
847-566-6401 

Barry J. Beitzel (TEDS) Professor of Old 
Testament and Semitic Languages; Associate 
Academic Dean 

B.A., M.A., Bob Jones University; Ph.D., 
Dropsie University 
847-317-8084 bbeitzel@trin.edu 

August J. Belauskas (MS) Vice Rector; Director 
of Pre-Theology Program; Instructor, Department 
ofPre-Theology; Associate Dean of Formation 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., 
Ph.D. cand., Loyola University, Chicago 
847-566-6401 



123 



Linda L. Belleville (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Biblical Literature 

B.M., University of Rochester, Eastman School of 
Music; M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D., University of St. Michael's College 
773-244-6238 lbellev@northpark.edu 

Warren S. Benson (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education; Vice President of Professional Doctoral 
Programs; Director of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program 

B.A., Northwestern College; Th.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.R.E., Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Loyola 
University, Chicago 
847-317-8110 

Michelle W. Bentley (M/L) Instructor in Ministry 
Studies; Dean of Students 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Northeast Illinois 
University; M.Div., Meadville/Lombard Theological 
School 
773-753-3 198 mbentley@midway.uchicago.edu 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies; Director of D.Min. Program 
B.S., Marian College; M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis 
University 

773-753-5325 

Norman E. Bevan, C.S.Sp. (CTU) President 
C.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., 
Accademia Alfonsiana, Rome 
773-753-5309 



Richard Bliese (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
World Mission and Evangelism; Associate Director 
of the Chicago Center for Global Ministries 
B.A., Wright State University; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex; Ph.D., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago 
773-256-0672 rbliese@lstc.edu 

Barbara E. Bowe, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Biblical Studies 
B.A., Manhattanville College; M.Ed., Boston 
College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; Th.D., 
Harvard University 
773-753-533 1 73642-2526@compuserve.com 

Bobbi Bower (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

B.A., Houghton College; M.S. in Ed., State 
University of New York 
913-651-2624 bbowerl029@aol.com 

Patrick J. Boyle, S.J. (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Christian Life 
M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., 
West Baden College; Ph.D., Marquette University 
847-566-6401 

Paul D. G. Bramer (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A.T.S. cand., 
University of British Columbia; M.A. (Education), 
Brock University; Ed.D., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School 
773-244-6245 pbramer@northpark.edu 



Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Divine Word College; S.T.B., S.T.L., 
Pontifical Gregorian University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Notre Dame; study: University of 
Cambridge 
773-753-5326 

Kathleen D.Billman (LSTC) Associate Professor 
of Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Div., Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary 
773-256-0778 kbillman@lstc.edu 

Phyllis A. Bird (G-ETS) Associate Professor of Old 
Testament Interpretation 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Th.D., 
Harvard Divinity School; study: University of 
Heidelberg 
847-866-3976 pbi807@nwu.edu 



Robert L. Brawley (MTS) Albert G. McGaw 
Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Erskine College; B.D., Erskine Theological 
Seminary; S.T.M., Lutheran Theological Southern 
Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 
773-947-6322 

John S. Bray (NPTS) Professor of Church History 
B.A., Wayne State University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford 
University; study: University of Strasbourg; 
University of Geneva 
773-244-6216 

Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Benbur Priory; M.A., Stonebridge Priory; 
M.A., Ph.D., De Paul University 

Harold O. J. Brown (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology, Franklin Forman Chair 
of Christian Ethics and Theology 



124 



B.A., Harvard University; S.T.B., Th.M., Harvard 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Harvard University; study: 
Marburg University 
847-317-8062 

James Bruckner (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Old Testament 

B.A., North Park College; M.A.T.S., North Park 
Theological Seminary; M.Div., Luther- 
Northwestern Theological Seminary; Th.D. cand., 
Luther Seminary 
773-244-6222 jkb@northpark.edu 



Sara Butler, M.S.B.T. (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Systematic Theology 
B.S., Fordham School of Education; M.A., Catholic 
University of America; S.T.L., University of St. Mary 
of the Lake; Ph.D., Fordham University 
847-566-6401 

Richard R. Caemmerer, Jr. (LSTC) Visiting 
Professor of Theology and Art 
B.F.A., Washington University: M.F.A., Indiana 
University; Diploma, University of Heidelberg 
509-763-3693 



Lorraine S. Brugh (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.M., M.M., Northwestern University; M.T.S., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
cand., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
and Northwestern University 



Helen Cahill, O.P. (CTU) Adjunct Instructor in 
Spirituality 

B.S., Regis College; M.S., Marquette University; 
M.A., University of Notre Dame; M.T.S., Catholic 
Theological Union 



Elizabeth Bueschel (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Keuka College; M.Div., Chicago Theological 

Seminary 

312-939-5918 

Michael A. Bull more (TEDS) Assistant Professor 
of Practical Theology 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Wheaton College; 
M.Div., Th.M., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 
847-317-8035 

Douglas Busby (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

Premedicine I and II, M.D., M.Sc. in Biophysics, 

University of Western Ontario 

773-975-5831 



George E. Cairns, Jr. (CTS) Assistant Professor 
of Practical Theology and Spirituality; Director, 
Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 
University; M.Div., Chicago Theological 
Seminary 
773-752-5757 ext. 235 

Alva R. Caldwell (G-ETS) Librarian for Program 
and Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS; 
Associate Professor of Ministries 
B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; 
D.Min., Mundelein Seminary of the University of 
St. Mary of the Lake 
847-866-3911 alva@nwu.edu 



Richard P. Busse (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.T.S., Th.M., Th.D., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
219-464-7278 

Alfloyd Butler (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
African American Religious Studies 
B.S., Southern University; M.Div., Virginia Union 
University School ofTheoIogy; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 
630-620-2119 

Lee H. Butler, Jr. (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Pastoral Theology 
B.A., Bucknell University; M.Div., Eastern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.Th., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; M.Ph., Ph.D~., Drew 
University 
773-752-5757 ext. 238 



Elizabeth F.Caldwell (MTS) Harold Blake Walker 
Professor of Pastoral Theology 
B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; M.Ed., Vanderbilt 
University; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and Northwestern 
University; study: Presbyterian School of 
Christian Education 
773-947-6329 

Louis J. Cameli (MS) Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Christian Life 
S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome 
847-566-6401 



Nigel M. de S. Cameron (TEDS) Provost; 
Professor of Biblical and Systematic Theology 
B.A., M.A., Emmanuel College, University of 
Cambridge; B.D., Ph.D., New College, University 
ofEdinburgh 
847-3 1 7-8057 ncameron@trin.edu 



125 



Cynthia M. Campbell (MTS) President 

B.A., Occidental College; M.Div., Harvard Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Southern Methodist University 
773-947-6301 

John F. Canary (MS) Rector 

M.A.S., University of San Francisco; S.T.L., D.Min., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake 
847-566-6401 

Linda M. Cannell (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.R.E., Central Baptist Seminary, Toronto; B.A., 
University of Manitoba; M.R.E., Ed.D., 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 
847-317-8029 

Richard W. Carlson (NPTS) Professor of 
Ministry; Director of Field Education 
B.A., North Park College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; study: North 
Park Theological Seminary 
773-244-6227 rcarlso@northpark.edu 

Donald A. Carson (TEDS) Research Professor of 
New Testament 

B.S., McGill University; M.Div., Central Baptist 
Seminary; Ph.D., Cambridge University 
847-317-8081 

Anna Case-Winters (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Church 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.Div., Columbia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
773-947-6321 

Giacomo Cassesi (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Seminario Evangelico Asociado, Venezuela; 
M.A.Th.S., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Th.D. cand., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago 

Peter T. Cha (TEDS) Instructor of Practical 
Theology 

B.A., University of Chicago; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D. cand., 
Northwestern University 
847-317-8033 pcha@trin.edu 

Ian M. Chapman (NBTS) President and Professor 
of Preaching 

B.A., University of Hawaii; B.D., Eastern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; study: University of 



California, Santa Barbara; Princeton Theological 

Seminary 

630-620-2101 

Donald Franklin Chatfield (G-ETS) Professor of 
Preaching; (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Preaching 
A.B., Yale University; B.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh 
847-866-3931 donchat35@aol.com 

HunnChoi (LSTC) Instructor in Greek 

Ph.D. cand., Lutheran School of Theology at 

Chicago 

773-667-7637 

Hearn Chun (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Ministry and Theological Studies 
B.A., Seoul National University; B.D., Perkins 
School of Theology; Th.M., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; study: University of Chicago 
773-947-6287 

William P. Clemmons (NBTS) Myers Professor of 
Pastoral Ministry and Christian Spirituality; 
Director of the Grow Center for the Renewal of 
the Churches 

B.A., University of South Carolina; M.A., Duquesne 
University; M.R.E., M.Div., Ed.D., Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; study: Universitaltalianaper 
Stranieri, Italy; Universita degli Studi, Rome; 
George Peabody College for Teachers, Vanderbilt 
University 
630-620-2121 

Mary Lou Cod man-Wilson (G-ETS) Adjunct 
Faculty Member 

A.B., Goucher College; M.A., Wheaton College; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 
847-866-3929 mlcodman@aol.com 

Robert E. Coleman (TEDS) Professor of 
Evangelism; Director of the School of World 
Mission and Evangelism 

B.A., Southwestern University; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Iowa 
847-317-8132 

Robert L. Conrad (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Educational Ministry; 
Director, Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. 
Louis; M.A. in Education, Washington University; 
Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 
773-256-0723 rconrad@lstc.edu 



126 



Terasa G. Cooley (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.A., University of Texas at Austin; M.Div., Harvard 
University 
773-342-4100 TGCool@aol.com 

Malcolm Cornwell, CP. (CTU) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Preaching 

M.A., St. John's University; M.Div., Passionist 
Seminary 

David Cort£s-Fuentes (MTS) Director, Hispanic 
Ministries Program 

B.S., Recinto Universitario de Mayaguez (UPR); 
M.Div., Seminario Evangelico de Puerto Rico; 
Th.M., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia; 
Ph.D. cand., Northwestern University 
773-947-6310 

Charles H. Cosgrove (NBTS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Bethel College; M.Div., Bethel Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
study: University of Tubingen; ISEDET, Buenos 
Aires 
630-620-21 13 cosgrove@northern.seminary.edu 

John A. Dally (S-WTS) Lecturer in Preaching 
B.A., University of California; M.Div., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
847-328-9300 

David D. Daniels III (MTS) Associate Professor 
of Church History 

B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Div., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary, New 
York 
773-947-6342 

William J. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Missions, Emeritus 
Diploma, Concordia College, Milwaukee; Diploma, 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Wheaton 
College; D.Theol. University of Heidelberg; study: 
University of Chicago 
773-947-9096 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

B.A., Houghton College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.S. in L.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; study: Columbia University; 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; American 
Institute of Holy Land Studies; Asbury Theological 
Seminary; University of Tubingen 
630-620-2191 



Mary K. Deeley (S-WTS) Lecturer in Old 
Testament and Biblical Languages 
B.Mus., Rosary College; M.Div., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Northwestern University 
847-328-9300 

David E. Dillon (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Judson College; 
B.A., Aurora College; M.Ed., Ed.D., Northern 
Illinois University 
847-3 17-8117 ddiilon@trin.edu 

Eleanor Doidge, L.O.B. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Mission and Ministry; Coordinator 
for World Mission 

B.A., Carlow College; M.A., Catholic Theological 
Union; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary; 
study: Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
773-753-5332 

John V. Dolciamore (MS) Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Christian Life 
B.A., M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; J.C.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome 
847-566-6401 

Perry G. Downs (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Director of the Ph.D. Program in 
Education; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Christian 
Education 

Dip., Miami Christian College; B.S., Philadelphia 
College of Bible; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
847-317-8048 pdowns@trin.edu 

John L. Dreibelbis (S-WTS) Associate Professor 
of Christian Ministries 

A.B., University of Chicago; M.Div., Seabury- 
Western Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago Divinity School 
847-328-9300 

Ruth Duck (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Worship 

B.A., Rhodes College; M.Div., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Th.D., 
Boston University School of Theology; D.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
847-866-3978 rdu742@nwu.edu 

Julie A. Duncan (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Old Testament Interpretation 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.T.S., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 
847-866-3934 



127 



Richard R. Dunn (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., Bryan College; M.A., Ed.D., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School 
847-317-8047 rdunn@trin.edu 

A. Royce Eckhardt (NPTS) Lecturer in 
Hymnology 

B.M., North Park College; M.M., University of 
Hartford 
630-323-2318 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) Associate Professor of 
Ministry 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
773-752-5757 ext. 251 

Sandra K. Edwards (MTS) Director of African 
American Ministries Program 
B.S., M.S. W., Florida State University; M.Div., 
Columbia Theological Seminary 
773-947-6279 



Theological School; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Chicago 

773-753-1326 ievison(S)aol.com 



Magdeleno Fabiosa, S.V.D. (CTU) Adjunct 
Lecturer in Spirituality 
Licentiate, Gregorian University 

John S. Feinberg (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.Div., 
Talbot Theological Seminary; Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 
847-317-8068 

Paul D. Feinberg (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; B.D., 
Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary; Th.D., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Roosevelt University; 
Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago 
847-317-8069 pfeinberg@trin.edu 



Sharon L. Ellis (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Chicago State University; M.Div., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary 
773-326-3448 



Bruce L. Fields (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.Div., Th.M., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., 
Marquette University 
847-317-8075 



J. Ronald Engel (M/L) Professor of Social Ethics 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., Meadville/ 
Lombard Theological School; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 
773-753-3199 jengel@niia.net 



Leon Finney (MTS) Director, African American 
Leadership Program 

M.A., Goddard College; M.A.T.S., D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary 

773-753-2470 



David V. Esterline (MTS) Director of Doctoral 
Programs and Continuing Education 
A.B., University of California; M.A., Oxford 
University, Trinity College; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union 
773-947-6332 



Robert M.Finster (S-WTS) Director of Music and 
Lecturer in Church Music 
B.A., Occidental College; M.Mus., D.M.A., 
Eastman School of Music of the University of 
Rochester 
847-328-9300 



Toinette M. Eugene (G-ETS) Associate Professor 
of Social Ethics 

B.A., University of San Francisco; M.A., Jesuit 
School of Theology, Berkeley, and Graduate 
Theological Union; Ph.D., Graduate Theological 
Union 
847-866-3973 tmeugene@nwu.edu 

Ian S. Evison (M/L) Assistant Professor of 
Ministry; Interim Academic Dean and Chief 
Executive Officer 
B.A., Carleton College; D.Min., Meadville/Lombard 



Brian J. Fischer (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Liturgy and Sacraments 

M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; S.L.D. 
cand., University of S. Anselmo, Rome 
847-566-6401 

Neal F. Fisher (G-ETS) President; Professor of 
Theology and Society 

A.B., DePauw University; M.Div., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Boston 
University Graduate School 
847-866-3901 nfisher@nwu.edu 



128 



Edward Foley, Capuchin (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy and Music 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.Div., St. Francis 
Seminary; M.Mus., University of Wisconsin; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 
773-753-5333 ebfchicago@aol.com 

Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Scripture and Theology 
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.A., Loyola 
University, Chicago; MARS., University of 
Chicago; Ph.D., University of Michigan 
847-566-6401 



Mary Frohlich (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Spirituality 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America 
773-753-53 1 3 mary-frohlich@claret.org 

Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) Professor of Old 
Testament 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div.. Central 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Midland Lutheran 
College; study: University of Erlangen 
773-256-0773 wfuerst@lstc.edu 



James A. Forbes, Jr. (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.Sc, Howard University; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; D.Min., Colgate- 
Rochester Divinity School 
212-222-5900 

Archimedes Fornasari, M.C.C.J. (CTU) Senior 
Research Fellow in Ethics 
M.A., Xavier University, Cincinnati; Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America 

773-753-5342 

Alan Forsman (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.Ed., C.A.G.S., 
Springfield College; D.Min., Drew University; 
study: North Park Theological Seminary; 
George Williams College; University of 
Massachusetts 
773-583-0220 ext. 13 

Richard Fragomeni (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Liturgy and Preaching 

B.A., Siena College; S.T.B., M.A., University of 
Louvain; M.A., Ph.D., M.Mus., Catholic University 
of America 
773-753-5328 

Mark Francis, C.S.V. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Liturgy 

B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., M.A., 
Catholic Theological Union; S.L.L., S.L.D., 
Pontifical Liturgical Institute of St. Anselm, 
Rome 
773-753-5334 mark-r-francis@msn.com 



Neil W. Gerdes (CTS and M/L) Librarian; 
Associate Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; M.A.L.S., 
University of Chicago; D.Min., University of St. 
Mary of the Lake 

773-752-5757 ext. 247 (CTS); 773-834-1172 
(M/L) 74454.1073@compuserve.com 

Kendyl L. R. Gibbons (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., 
University of Chicago; D.Min., Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School 
630-505-9408 RevKendyl@aol.com 

Thomas J. Gilbert (LSTC) Associate Director, 
Chicago Center for Religion and Science; Adjunct 
Professor of Religion and Science Studies 
B.S., M.S., California Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
Illinois Institute of Technology 
773-256-0768 tgilbert@lstc.edu 

David Gill (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Christian 
Ethics 

B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., San 
Francisco State University; Ph.D., University of 
Southern California 
773-244-5662 dgill@northpark.edu 

Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Professor of 
Theological Anthropology 
M.A. (Anthropology), M.A. (Linguistics), Ph.D., 
University of Edinburgh; study: University of 
Cambridge 
773-753-5343 



David J. Frenchak (SCUPE) President 

B.A., Toccoa Falls Bible College; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Andover Newton 
Theological School 
312-726-1200 



John Charles Godbey (M/L) Professor Emeritus 
of Church History 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Federated Theological Faculty, University of 
Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 



129 



Judith M. Golz (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Ph.D., New York 
University 
847-317-8116 

Robert E. Goss (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Holy Cross College; M.Div., Weston School 
of Theology; Th.D., Harvard University 

Stephen R. Graham (NPTS) Dean of Faculty; 
Associate Professor of American Church History 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton Graduate 
School; Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity 
School 
773-244-6211 srg@northpark.edu 

Michael P. Green (TEDS) Director of Supervised 
Ministries; Associate Professor of Practical 
Theology 

B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo; 
Th.M, Dallas Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of North Texas 
847-317-8031 mgreen@trin.edu 

Stephen P. Greggo (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.A., State University of New York College at 
Oneonta; M.A., Denver Seminary; Psy.D., State 
University of New York College at Albany 
847-317-8093 sgreggo@trin.edu 

Stanley J. Grenz (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Theology and Ethics 

B.A., University of Colorado; M.Div., Denver 
Seminary; D.Theol., University of Munich 
604-224-5014 sgrenz@unixg.ubc.ca 

James E. Griffiss (S-WTS) Visiting Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., Johns Hopkins University; S.T.B., 
General Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Yale 
University 
847-328-9300 

Wayne A. Grudem (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology 
B.A., Harvard University; M.Div., Westminster 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Cambridge 
847-317-8095 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) Professor of Christian 
Ethics; Vice President for Academic Affairs; Dean 
of the Faculty 
B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., 



Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Southern 

California, Los Angeles 

773-947-6306 

Stephen Hall (NPTS) Visiting Professor of Biblical 
Literature 

B.A., Taylor University; M.A., Institute of Holy 
Land Studies; Th.M., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago 
773-244-5667 shall@northpark.edu 

Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Professor of Ministry 
B.A., King College; B.D., Union Theological 
Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 
773-947-6267 

YunChun Han (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Old 
Testament 

B.S., Yonsei University, Seoul; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; study: University ofNotre 
Dame 

Adolf M. Hansen (G-ETS) Vice President for 
Administration; Associate Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., S.T.M., New York 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 
847-866-3906 ahansen@nwu.edu 

Nancy A. Hardesty (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.S.J., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

M. Susan Harlow (M/L) Assistant Professor of 
Religious Education 

B.A., Hollins College; M.Div., Andover Newton 
Theological School; Th.M., Harvard University; 
Ed.D., Columbia University 
773-753-0892 sharlow@midway.uchicago.edu 

Philip Harrold (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Church History 

B.S., Olivet Nazarene University; M.S., University 
of Kansas; M.A., Denver Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
University of Chicago Divinity School 

Amy Harvey (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Biblical 
Languages 

B.S., University of Michigan; M.A., University of 
Toledo; A.M., University of Chicago Divinity School 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 
B. A., Quincy College; Dr. Theol., Friedrich-Wilhelm 



130 



University, Bonn; Litt.D., St. Bonaventure 
University; Litt.D., Quincy College 

773-753-5344 

Warren J. Heard, Jr. (TEDS) Adjunct Professor 
of Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.S., Southern Methodist University; Dip., Moody 
Bible Institute; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; Ph.D., University of Aberdeen; 
Ed.D. cand., Northern Illinois University 
847-317-8116 

Philip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology; Director, Chicago Center for Religion 
and Science 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; Fulbright Scholar, University 
ofTiibingen 
773-256-0670 phemer@lstc.edu 

KurtK. Hendel (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of Reformation History 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 
University; Fulbright Scholar at University of 
Gottingen 
773-256-0776 khendel@lstc.edu 

Lawrence R. Hennessey (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Church History 
B.A., Holy Trinity Mission Seminary; S.T.B., M.A., 
S.T.L., School of Theology, Catholic University of 
America; M.A., Ph.D., Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences, Catholic University of America 
847-566-6401 

Carl F. H. Henry (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Th.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Boston University 
847-317-8041 



Theodore Hiebert (MTS) Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.A., Fresno Pacific College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard University 
773-947-6341 

John E. Hinkle, Jr. (G-ETS) Professor of Pastoral 
Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Taylor University; B.D., Garrett Theological 
Seminary; M. A., Ph.D., Northwestern University (in 
cooperation with Garrett Theological Seminary); 
Diplomate, American Association of Pastoral 
Counselors 
847-866-398 1 755 1 2.223 1 @compuserve.com 

David A. Hogue (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Theology and Counseling 
B.A., Greenville College; M.S.Ed., Indiana State 
University; M.Div., Christian Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 
847-866-3983 d-hogue@nwu.edu 

Paul A. Holloway (LSTC) Instructor in Greek 
A.B., University of Texas; M.A., Rice University; 
Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago 
773-702-5109 

Paul L. Holmer (NPTS) Visiting Professor of Theology 
B.A., M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Yale 
University 
612-789-6735 

Dwight N. Hopkins (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Harvard University; M.Div., M.Phil., Ph.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York 

Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.A., St. Francis College; M.A., Aquinas Institute 
of Theology; Ph.D., Northwestern University and 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
773-753-5345 76753.3230@compuserve.com 



HutzH, Hertzberg (TEDS) Dean of the Chapel 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton Graduate 
School; M.A.R., D.Min., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School 
847-317-8105 hhertzbe@trin.edu 

Paul G. Hiebert (TEDS) Associate Dean of 
Academic Doctoral Programs; Professor of 
Mission and Anthropology 
B.A., Tabor College; M.A., Mennonite Brethren 
Biblical Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota 
847-317-8134 phiebert@trin.edu 



EstellaBoggs Horning (NBTS) Affiliate Professor 
of Biblical Languages 

B.A., Manchester College; R.N., Presbyterian-St. 
Luke's Hospital; M.Div., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University 
630-620-2120 

Robert Hubbard (NPTS) Professor of Old 
Testament 

A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Fuller Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School; 
study: University of Illinois 
773-244-6246 rhubbar@northpark.edu 



131 



John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Church Law 

B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., M.Div., Catholic 
Theological Union; J.C.B., J.C.L., J.C.D., Catholic 
University of America 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy 

B.A., Newton College; M.A., Catholic University 
of America; M.A., Ph.D., University ofNotre Dame 
773-753-5346 hkhughes@aol.com 

Juan Huitrado (CTU) Adjunct Lecturer in Cross- 
Cultural Ministry 
M.Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union 

Alan D. Hultberg (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament 

B. A., John Muir College, University of California, 
San Diego; M.Div., Ph.D. cand., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School 
847-317-8094 

W. Bingham Hunter (TEDS) Academic Dean; 
Senior Vice President of Education; Professor of 
New Testament 

B.S., M.S., Michigan State University; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Aberdeen 
University 
847-3 1 7-8002 bhunter@trin.edu 

Reinhard Hutter (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Ethics and Theology 
M.Div. equiv.. University of Erlangen; Th.M., Duke 
University; Dr. theol., Dr. theol. habil., University 
of Erlangen; study: University of Bonn; University 
ofChicago 
773-256-0760 rhutter@lstc.edu 

Dawn Iacobucci (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.S., M.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois; M.T.S. 
cand., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
847-491-2722 d-iacobucci@nwu.edu 

Nduy'u J. B. Ikenye (S- WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Pan African Christian College; M.A., 
International School of Theology; M.T.S. , D.Min., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 
847-328-9300 

Everett Jackson (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.S., Roosevelt University; M.Ed., Northern Illinois 
University; M.Div., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 



Seminary; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary; 

CPE, Community Hospital of Evanston, St. Francis 

Hospital of Evanston; study: Northern Illinois 

University 

773-244-6221 ejackson@northpark.edu 

Theodore W. Jennings (CTS) Professor of 
Theology 

A.B., Duke University; B.D., Ph.D., Emory 
University 
773-752-5757 ext. 240 

Richard Jensen (LSTC) Axel Jacob and Gerda 
Maria Carlson Professor of Homiletics; Dean of 
A CTS D. Min. in Preaching Program 
B.A., Dana College; M.Div., Wartburg Theological 
Seminary; S.T.M., Chicago Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Aquinas Institute 
773-256-0751 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) Senior Scholar in New 
Testament Interpretation 

B. A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary /University ofChicago; Dr. 
theol., University of Tubingen 
847-866-3979 rjewett@nwu.edu 

Evelyn M. R. Johnson (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Christian Education 
B.A., M.A. in Ed., University of Nebraska 
773-583-0220 emrj@aol.com 

Emma J. Justes (NBTS) Professor of Pastoral 
Care and Pastoral Theology 
B.A., Franklin College of Indiana; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School; Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary 
630-620-2124 

Cynthia Jiirisson (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
American Church History 
B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther Northwestern 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary 
773-256-0769 cjurisso@lstc.edu 

Kenneth S. Kantzer (TEDS) Dean of Graduate 
School, Dean Emeritus; Distinguished Professor 
of Biblical and Systematic Theology 
A.B., Ashland College; A.M., Ohio State University; 
B.D., S.T.M., Faith Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 
847-3 1 7-8 1 33 kkantzer@trin.edu 

Deborah Kapp (MTS) Assistant Professor in the 
Field of Ministry 



132 



A.B., Brown University; M.Div., Union Theological 
Seminary 

773-947-6327 

John M. Kaserow, M.M. (CTU) Adjunct Professor 
of Mission Studies 

M.Th., M.Div., Maryknoll School of Theology; 
M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., University 
of St. Michael's College, Toronto 

Calvin Katter, Jr. (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Biblical Literature 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Fuller Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
773-244-5735 ckatter@northpark.edu 

Louis F. Kavar (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B. A., M.A., Duquesne University; Ph.D., University 
ofPittsburgh 

Richard Kieckhefer (S-WTS) Northwestern 
University Visiting Professor in Church History 
B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Texas, Austin 
847-491-2614 kieckhefer@nwu.edu 

Keith Killinger (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Church History 

B.A., Concordia Teachers College; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex; Th.M., Th.D., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago 
773-582-7406 VDST41A@prodigy.com 



Jane K. Koonce (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Baylor University; M.A., Columbia University 
Teachers College; M.P.S., Loyola University, 
Chicago; study; St. George's College, Jerusalem; 
University of California, Berkeley 
773-244-6210 jkoonce@northpark.edu 

PaulE.Koptak (NPTS) Paul and Bernice Brandel 
Assistant Professor of Communication and Biblical 
Interpretation 

A.B., Rutgers University; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and Northwestern University; 
study: Regent College; Westminster Theological 
Seminary 
773-244-6242 pek@northpark.edu 

Edgar M. Krentz (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of New Testament 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Ph.D., Washington University; study: University of 
Chicago; American School of Classical Studies, 
Athens; University of Tubingen 
773-256-0752 ekrentz@lstc.edu 

Paul LaChance (CTU) Adjunct Assistant Professor 
in Spirituality 

B.A., St. Francis College; M.Th., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Pontificium 
Athenaeum Anton ianum, Rome 



John F. Kilner (TEDS) Professor ofBioethics and 
Contemporary Culture; Director of Bannockburn 
Institute for Christianity and Contemporary Culture 
B.A., Yale University; M.Div., Gordon-Conwell 
Theological Seminary; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 
847-317-8076 jkilner@trin.edu 

Ralph W.Klein (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of Old Testament; Dean 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis; Th.D., Harvard University; 
study: University of Michigan; University of 
Gottingen; Kirchliche Hochschule, Berlin 
773-256-0721 rklein@lstc.edu 

Connie Kleingartner (LSTC) Director of Field 
Education; Associate Professor of Congregational 
Mission 

B.S., Minot State University; M.Div., S.T.M. 
Wartburg Theological Seminary; Ed.D. cand., 
University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minn. 
773-256-0746 ckleinga@lstc.edu 



Andre LaCocque (CTS) Professor Emeritus of Old 
Testament 

D.Litt, D.Theol., University of Strasbourg 
773-752-5757 ext. 236 

David L. Larsen (TEDS) Professor Emeritus of 
Preaching 

B.A., Stanford University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; study: North Park 
Theological Seminary 

Roy Larson (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary 
847-866-3960 rlarson@nwu.edu 

Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU) Adjunct 
Professor of New Testament 
M.A., John Carroll University; S.T.L., University 
of Fribourg; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; 
E16ve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 



133 



Jong Min Lee (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Korean 
Church History 

Th.B., Th.M, Han Kuk Theological Seminary; 
M.Div., Winebrenner Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary 

Sang Bok Lee (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
and Northwestern University 

Leo D. Lefebure (MS) Dean of the Canonical 
Faculty; Professor, Department ofSystematics 
S.T.B., M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
847-566-6401 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Theology 

B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

773-752-5757 ext. 228 

Timothy Lenchak, S.V.D. (CTU) Adjunct Assistant 
Professor in Biblical Studies 
B.A., Divine Word College; M.Div., Catholic 
Theological Union; S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian 
University 

Bruce Lescher (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Spirituality 

M.A., University of Michigan; M.A.S., University of 
San Francisco; Ph.D., Graduate Theological Union 

773-753-5348 blescher@mcs.com 



Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
New Testament 

B.D. (equiv), University of Erlangen; Th.D., Boston 
University School of Theology; study: University 
of Munster; University of Michigan 
773-779-7489 wclinss@mcs.com 

Charles H. Lippy (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Dickinson College; M.Div., Union Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton University 

Jerome E. Listecki (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Christian Life 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; J.C.L., 
J.C.D., S.T.D. cand., Pontifical University of St. 
Thomas Aquinas, Rome; J.D., De Paul 
University 
847-566-6401 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) Professor of Christian 
Ethics 

B.A., Smith College; M.A., Columbia University/ 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 
773-947-6331 

John G. Lodge (MS) Academic Dean; Assistant 
Professor, Department of Sacred Scripture 
M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A., University of Illinois, Chicago; S.S.L., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.T.D., 
Gregorian University, Rome 
847-566-6401 



William E. Lesher (LSTC) President 
A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div. 
Lutheran Theological Seminary 
773-256-0728 wlesher@lstc.edu 



Chicago 



Ronald Lewinski (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Worship 

M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake 
847-566-6401 

David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
World Mission and World Religions 
A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 
773-256-0695 dblindberg@aol.com 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) Adjunct Associate 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Georgetown University; S.T.B., M.A., S.T.L., 
S.T.D., University of Louvain 

773-753-5347 



Crawford W. Loritts, Jr. (TEDS) 
Instructor in Urban Ministry 
B.A., Philadelphia College of the Bible 



Visiting 



JeanetteLucinio,S.P. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Religious Education; Director of M.A.P.S. 
Program 

B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.A., 
Mundelein College, M.Div., Catholic Theological 
Union; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary 
773-753-5317 

Milo D. Lundell (TEDS) Executive Vice President 
ofOperations 

B.A., St. Paul Bible College; B.D., D.Min., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School 
847-3 1 7-8039 mlundell@trin.edu 

Robert Lupton (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., God's Bible College; MA., Georgia State 
University; Ph.D., University of Georgia 
406-627-4304 



134 



Anne Luther (CTU) Adjunct Assistant Professor 
in Spirituality 
B.A., Indiana University; M.A., Mundelein College 

Kevin J. Madigan (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Church History; Director ofM.A. Program 
B.A., College of Holy Cross; M.A., University of 
Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

773-753-5350 

Dennis R. Magary (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin 
847-317-8065 dmagary@trin.edu 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (NBTS) Professor of 
Biblical Theology and Spirituality; Library 
Director 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Barry University; 
MLIS, University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., St. 
Louis University 
630-620-2 1 1 5 mainelli@northern.seminary.edu 

Judith G. Mannheim (M/L) Instructor of 
Religious Education; Associate Dean, Modified 
Residency Program and Continuing Education 
B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.Div., Andover 
Newton Theological School 
773-753-1322 jmannhei@midvvay.uchicago.edu 

Paul Manz (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor Emeritus of Church Music and Artist in 
Residence 

B.S. in Ed., Concordia College, River Forest; M.M., 
Northwestern University; Fulbright Scholar, First 
Prize in Organ and Improvisation, Royal Flemish 
Conservatory at Antwerp, Belgium 
3 1 2-880- 1 863 1 04640.3025@compuserve.com 

Claude F. Mariottini (NBTS) Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.A., California Baptist College; M.Div., Golden 
Gate Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; study; Graduate 
Theological Union 
630-620-2186 

Robert McClory (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; B.S.J., 
Northwestern University 
847^*91-3952 r-mcclory@nwu.edu 

John J. McDonnell (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Systematic Theology 



B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.B., M.Div., 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; SEOL, 
Oriental Institute, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian 
University 
847-566-6401 

Carol Ann McGibbon (SCUPE) Executive Vice- 
President 

B.A., Acadia University; M.Div., Acadia Divinity 
College 
312-726-1200 

Barbara H. McGinnis-Gillispie (NBTS) Adjunct 
Professor of Christian Education 
B.S., Marshall University; M.S., Russell Sage 
College; M.Div., Colgate Rochester Divinity School; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 
312-288-5943 

James P. Mcllhone (MS) Professor, Department 
of Sacred Scripture; Associate Academic Dean 
M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
Ph.D., Marquette University 
847-566-6401 

Terry Mclntyre (LSTC) Instructor in Church 
History 

B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.A., 
Northwestern University; M.Div., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago; Ph.D. cand., New College, 
University of Edinburgh 

David J. McKay (TEDS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B A, University oflllinois, 
Chicago; MA., Ph.D., LoyolaUniversity, Chicago 
847-317-8120 

LoisMcKinney (TEDS) Professor of Mission 
B. A., Biola University; M.R.E., Denver Seminary; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University; study: Toronto 
Institute of Linguistics; Universidade de Coimbra, 
Portugal; Universidade de Lisbon; Wheaton College 
Graduate School 
847-317-8137 

Thomas McQuaid (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Pastoral Life 

M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake 
847-566-6401 

Veronica Mendez, R.C.D. (MS) Director of 
Hispanic Ministry 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.T.S., Jesuit 
School of Theology, Berkeley 
847-566-6401 



135 



Charles R. Meyer (MS) Professor Emeritus, 
Departments of Systematic Theology and Church 
History 

M.A., S.T.D., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
B.S., Library Science, Rosary College; study: 
Vatican Library; Gregorian University, Rome 
847-566-6401 

Kenneth M. Meyer (TEDS) Chancellor 

Dip., B.D., Trinity Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
Luther Rice University 
847-317-8003 kmeyer@trin.edu 

Ruth A. Meyers (S-WTS) Assistant Professor of 
Liturgies 

B.S., Syracuse University; M.Div., Seabury- Western 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame 
847-328-9300 

Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Vienna; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin; study: University of 
Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; Western Michigan University; Yale 
University; Pontifical Biblical Institute; Loyola 
University, Chicago 
773-256-0772 wmichel@lstc.edu 

Arlene Michna (MS) Director of Music 
Mus.B., Mus.M., De Paul University 
847-566-6401 



Douglas J. Moo (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament; Director of the Ph.D. Program in 
Theological Studies 

B.A., DePauw University; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University of 
St. Andrews 
847-317-8083 dmoo@trin.edu 

Robert L. Moore (CTS) Professor of Psychology 
and Religion 

B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., Southern Methodist 
University; M.Th., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; Diplomate, Alfred Adler 
Institute of Chicago; Diplomate, C. G. Jung Institute 
ofChicago 
773-752-5757 ext. 273 

Wilda W.Morris (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., American University; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Illinois; M.A., M.Div., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary 
847-866-3962 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi (NBTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society; Director of Hispanic Studies 
B.S., Instituto Politecnico Otto Krause, Buenos 
Aires; L.Soc, Universidad Argentina de Ciencias 
Sociales; B.Teol., Seminario Biblico 
Latinoamericano, San Jose\ Costa Rica; Th.M., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory 
University; study: Seminario Internacional Teol6gico 
Bautista, Buenos Aires; Princeton University 
630-620-2125 



Connie Miller (LSTC) Interim Dean of 
Community 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.Div., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago; study: Marquette 
University 
773-256-0756 cmiller@lstc.edu 

Margaret M. Mitchell (MTS) Associate Professor 
of New Testament 

B.A., Manhattanville College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University ofChicago; study: Boston College 
773-947-6340 

Carol Montgomery-Fate (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 
B.A., University of Iowa; M.S.W., University of 
Chicago; M.Div., Chicago Theological Seminary 
708-848-6620 

Tom Montgomery-Fate (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 
B.A., University of Iowa; M.A., Chicago 
Theological Seminary 
630-942-3412 



Deborah F.Mullen (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Ministry and Historical Studies; Associate 
Dean of Masters Programs for Experiential 
Education 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.Div., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School/Bexley Hall/Crozer 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., University of 
Chicago 
773-947-6271 

Larry G. Murphy (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
the History of Christianity 
B.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union 
847-866-3977 

William R. Myers (CTS) Academic Dean; 
Professor of Christian Education 
M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; M.Ed., 
Rhode Island College; Ed.D., Loyola University of 
Chicago 
773-752-5757 ext. 224 



136 



Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
study: University of Cambridge 
773-753-5349 tanairn(2)aol.com 



John W. Nyquist (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Evangelism; Director of Mission and Evangelism 
Internship Program 

B.A., M.A., California State University; M.A., 
M.Div., Ph.D.,Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
847-317-8129 



F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) Research Professor of 
Christian Ethics 

A.B., Brown University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Garrett Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University; study: North Park 
Theological Seminary; University of Chicago 
773-244-6226 

Linda Lee Nelson (LSTC) Lecturer in History and 
Theology 

B.A., Wartburg College; M.Div., Luther Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 
708-850-9831 



Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Director of 
Library; Professor of Bibliography 
A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois; study: University of Detroit; Loyola 
University, Chicago; St. Louis University; Spalding 
College 
773-753-5322 omalleyk@ctu.lib.il.us 

James Okoye, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Old Testament Studies 
B.A., Oxford University; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical 
Institute; D.Phil., Oxford University 

773-753-5358 



William R. Nelson (NBTS) Professor of Ministry; 
Director of Supervised Ministry 
B.S., College of Charleston; B.D., Th.M., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar, University 
ofHeidelberg 
630-620-2128 

Harold A. Netland (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Philosophy of Religion and Mission; Naomi A. 
Fausch Chair of Missions; Director of Ph.D. 
Program in Intercultural Studies 
B.A., Biola College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School 
847-317-8127 hnetland@trin.edu 

Thomas J. Nettles (TEDS) Professor of Church History 
B.A., Mississippi College; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 
847-3 1 7-8066 tnettles@trin.edu 

Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor Emeritus 
of Preaching 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar at 
Manchester University 
773-667-2959 

Carol M. Nor£n (NPTS) Wesley W. Nelson 
Associate Professor ofHomiletics 
B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary 
773-244-6225 cnoren@northpark.edu 



Theodore M. Olsen (TEDS) Associate Professor 
of Practical Theology 

B. A., Rockford College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; study: University of Iowa 
847-317-8037 

Diane Olson (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.C.E., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary 
847-866-3949 olso628@aol.com 

Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr. (TEDS) Associate 
Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., Wheaton College; Th.M., Dallas Theological 
Seminary; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; 
Ph.D., University of Aberdeen 
847-317-8064 

Grant R. Osborne (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor in New 
Testament 

B.A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University of 
Aberdeen 
847-317-8082 

Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Professor of 
New Testament Studies 

B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; M.A.T., 
Manhattanville College; Th.D., Harvard University 
773-753-5351 Iynosiek@aol.com 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy 
S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum 



137 



Antonianum, Rome; study: Harvard University, 
University of California 

773-753-5352 

Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Cyrus H. McCormick 
Professor of Systematic Theology 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San 
Francisco Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; study: University of 
Munich 
773-947-6323 

Stephanie Paulsell (CTU) Visiting Scholar of 
Spirituality 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

David P. Pavlik (MS) Associate Dean of Formation 
B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake 
847-566-6401 



Richard I. Pervo (S-WTS) Professor of New 
Testament and Patristics 

B.A., Concordia College, Milwaukee; B.D., 
Episcopal Theological School; Th.D., Harvard 
University 
847-328-9300 

John E. Phelan, Jr. (NPTS) President and Dean; 
Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 
773-244-6214 jphelan@northpark.edu 

Jamie T. Phelps, O.P. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S.W., University of 
Illinois; M.A., St. John's University; Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America 
773-753-5336 jamie50918@aol.com 



John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Ethics 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., University 
ofChicago 

773-753-5353 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chautauqua 
Professor of Jewish Studies 
B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., Jewish 
Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L., D.D., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, 
Cincinnati 
773-753-5354 



James N. Poling (G-ETS) Professor of Pastoral 
Care, Counseling, and Theology 
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., School of Theology, 
Claremont 
847-866-3985 jpoling@nwu.edu 

Robert J. Price (NBTS) Assistant Professor of 
Evangelism 

B.Ed., M.Ed., University of Illinois; M.A., 
Governors State University; D.Min., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary 
630-620-2 1 67 7307 1 .305 1 @compuserve.com 



Arturo Perez (CTU) Adjunct Instructor in Liturgy 
B.A., M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A., University of Notre Dame 

AlbertP.Pero,Jr. (LSTC) Professor of Theology 
and Cross-Cultural Studies 
A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; B.Th., Concordia 
Theological Seminary, Springfield, 111.; S.T.D., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
773-256-0750 apero@lstc.edu 

Michael Perry, O.F.M. (CTU) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Missiology 
Ph.D. cand., Birmingham University, England 



Lallene J. Rector (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Psychology of Religion and Pastoral 
Psychotherapy 

B.A., Texas Christian University; M.T.S., Ph.D., 
Boston University 
847-866-3986 

Jerold F. Reed (NPTS) Milton B. Engebretson 
Associate Professor of Church Growth and 
Evangelism 

B.S., University of California, Davis; M.Div., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; study: North 
Park Theological Seminary 
773-244-6235 jreed@northpark.edu 



Richard Perry (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
Church and Society and Urban Ministry 
B.A., Carthage College; M.Div., Th.M., Th.D., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
773-256-0677 rperry@lstc.edu 



Barbara Reid, O.P. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
New Testament Studies 

B.A., M.A., Aquinas College; Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America 
773-753-5338 ber53@aol.com 



138 



Michael D. Reynolds (TEDS) Director of Master 
of Arts in Religion Program, Emphasis in Urban 
Ministry 

B.S., Illinois State University 
847-317-8079 

David M. Rhoads (LSTC) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Gettysburg College; MA., Oxford University; 
B.D., Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 
University 
773-256-0774 drhoads@lstc.edu 

GaryRiebe-Estrella,S.V.D. (CTU) Vice President 
and Academic Dean; Assistant Professor of 
Hispanic Ministry and Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Divine Word College; M.A., DePaul 
University; S.T.D., Universidad Pontificia de 
Salamanca 
773-753-5307 greibe@tezcat.com 

Luis Rivera-Rodriguez (MTS) Assistant 
Professor of Theology 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.Div., Evangelical 
Seminary of Puerto Rico; Th.M., Th.D., Harvard 
Divinity School 
773-947-6330 

Jos6 David Rodriguez (LSTC) Associate 
Professor of Theology; Director of Hispanic 
Ministries Program 

B.A., Universidad de Puerto Rico; M.Div., Th.M., 
Th.D., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
773-256-0749 jrodrigu@lstc.edu 

Daniel R. Rodrfguez-Diaz (MTS) Professor of 
Church History and Hispanic Ministry 
B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.Div., Graduate 
School of Theology, Oberlin College; Ph.D., 
National University of Mexico 
773-947-6311 

Theodore C. Ross, S J. (CTU) Lecturer in Church 
History; (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Church History 
LitLB., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden College; 
M.A. (History), M.A. (Theology), Loyola University, 
Chicago; S.T.L., Bellarmine School of Theology 
847-566-6401 



Wolfgang M. W. Roth (G-ETS) Senior Scholar in 
Old Testament Interpretation 
cand. rev. min., Universities of Marburg, Tubingen, 
Heidelberg; Th.M., Th.D., Victoria University/ 
Toronto School of Theology 
847-866-3877 wroth@nwu.edu 

Arlin J. Rothauge (S-WTS) Professor of 
Congregational Development; Director ofSeabury 
Institute 

B.A., University of Oregon; B.D., Phillips 
University; Ph.D., University of Scotland, Glasgow 
847-328-9300 

D. Nicholas Rudall (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Communication Arts 

B.A., Cambridge University; Ph.D., Cornell 
University 
773-702-0721 

Rosemary Radford Ruether (G-ETS) Georgia 
Harkness Professor of Applied Theology 
B.A., Scripps College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School 
847-866-3953 r-ruether@nwu.edu 

Kenneth Sawyer (MTS and JKM) Assistant 
Professor of Church History; Reference Librarian 
B.A., University ofNebraska, Lincoln; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A.L.S., University 
of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity 
School 

773-947-6304 (MTS); 773-256-0685 
(JKM) ksawyer@lstc.edu 

Herman E.Schaalmann (CTS and G-ETS) Adjunct 
Faculty Member 

B.A., M.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., 
M.H.L., Hebrew Union College 

773-561-5173 

James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
Missions and Church History 
A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; study: Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Columbia University; 
International Christian University, Japan; Oxford 
University 
708-386-6811 



Barbara Rossing (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., Carleton College; M.Div., Yale Divinity 
School; Th.D. cand., Harvard Divinity School 
773-256-0765 brossing@lstc.edu 



David Schiedermayer (TEDS) Visiting Professor 
ofBioethics 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.D., Medical College of 
Wisconsin 
847-317-8042 



139 



Daniel S.Schipani (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

Lic.Psy., Universidad de Buenos Aires; Dr.Psy., 
Universidad Cat61ica Argentina; M.A.R., Goshen 
Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; study: University of California, Los Angeles 
219-296-6237 

Robert L. Schoenstene (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture 
B.A., St. Francis DeSales College; M.A., Loyola 
University, Chicago; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical 
Institute, Rome 
847-566-6401 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.Pp.S. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., University of 
Nijmegen: study: Oxford University 

773-753-5329 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor Emeritus 
of Religion and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 
773-752-5757 ext. 233 

Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Cross-Cultural Ministry 
L.Miss., D.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian University 

773-753-5356 

Martha L. Scott (G-ETS) Associate Director of 
Field Education; Assistant Professor of Church 
Administration 

B.A., Governors State University; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 
847-866-3956 mscott628@nwu.edu 

Charles M. Sell (TEDS) Professor of Christen 
Education 

B.A., University^ Pittsburgh; Th.M., Th.D., Dallas 
Theological Seminary 
847-3 1 7-8049 csell@trin.edu 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) Professor of New 
Testament Studies 

S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain 
773-753-5357 dsenior357@aol.com 

Mark H. Senter III (TEDS) Associate Professor 
of Christian Education; Vice President of 
Division of Non-Traditional and Distance 
Education 



Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., University of 

Illinois Circle Campus; M.A., Trinity Evangelical 

Divinity School; Ph.D., Loyola University, 

Chicago 

847-317-6551 msenter@trin.edu 

Linda Sevcik, S.M. (MS) Director of Field 
Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Detroit; S.T.L., Pontifical 
Gregorian University 
847-566-6401 

Jack L. Seymour (G-ETS) Dean; Professor of 
Christian Education; Director of the Joint Ph.D. 
Program (with Northwestern University) 
B.S., Ball State University; M.Div., D.Min., 
Vanderbilt University Divinity School; Ph.D., 
George Peabody College 
847-866-3904 jse247@nwu.edu 

Neil H. Shadle (M/L) Associate Professor of 
Ministry 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan Univesity; B.D., Meadville/ 
Lombard Theological School; D.Min., Pacific 
School of Religion 
773-753-3193 nshadle@aol.com 

Douglas R. Sharp (NBTS) Professor of Christian 
Theology 

B.A., William Jewell College; M.Div., American 
Baptist Seminary of the West; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union 
63 0-620-2 1 22 drsharp@seminary.edu 

MarkS.Sisk (S-WTS) President and Dean 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.Div., General 

Theological Seminary 

847-328-9300 

Daniel S. Siwek (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Ministry 

M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake 
847-566-6401 

Brett H. Smith (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.S., University of Illinois; M.Div., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Northwestern 
University 
217-3 52-2240 bhsmith@prairienet.org 

Kenneth B. Smith, Sr. (CTS) President; Associate 
Professor of Ministry 

B.A., Virginia Union University; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; D.P.S., National College of 
Education 
773-752-5757 ext. 222 



140 



Newland F. Smith III (S-WTS) Librarian for 
Collection Management, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS; Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs; Associate Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate Library 
School, University of Chicago; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary 
847-866-3897 

Virginia Berglund Smith (MTS) Jean W. and 
Frank T. Mohr Professor of Ministry 
B.A., Cedar Crest College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary 
773-947-6312 

Klyne R. Snodgrass (NPTS) Paul W. Brandel 
Chair in New Testament Studies 
B.A., Columbia Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University of 
St. Andrews, Scotland 
773-244-6243 ksnodgr@northpark.edu 

Graydon F. Snyder (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; study: Pontifical Institute of Christian 
Archaeology, Rome; Cambridge University 

Mark Sorvillo (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Church History 
B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.Div., S.T.L., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; Ph.D., University 
ofChicago 
847-566-6401 



Ken Stone (CTS) Assistant Professor of Hebrew 
Bible 

B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Church of God School 
of Theology; Th.M., Harvard Divinity School; M.A., 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
773-752-5757 ext. 239 

Norma S. Sutton (NPTS) Seminary Librarian; 
Associate Professor of Theological Bibliography 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory University 
773-244-6239 nss@northpark.edu 

Sarah J. Tanzer (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Judaism and Christian Origins 
A.B., Dickinson College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Harvard University; study: Hebrew 
University; Oxford University 
773-947-6328 

Wayne R. Teasdale (CTU) Adjunct Assistant 
Professor in Spirituality 

B.A., St. Anselm College; M.A., MacAuley Institute; 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

JoAnne M. Terrell (CTS) Instructor of 
Theological Anthropology and Ethics 
B.A., Rollins College; M.Div., M.Ph., Ph.D. cand., 
Union Theological Seminary 
773-752-5757 ext. 234 

Helen Theodoropoulos (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Theology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University ofChicago; M.T.S., 
Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology 



Miriam J. Stark (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.A., The King's College, Briarcl iff Manor, N.Y.; 
M.A., Liberty University; M.A., Biola University; 
Ph.D., Rosemead Graduate School 
847-3 17-8119 mstark@trin.edu 



Susan B. Thistlethwaite (CTS) Professor of 
Theology and Culture; Director, Center for 
Theology, Ethics and the Human Sciences 
B.A., Smith College; M.Div., Duke Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Duke University 
773-752-5757 ext. 237 



William Richard Stegner (G-ETS) Senior Scholar 
in New Testament; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor in 
New Testament 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Drew 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University 
847-866-3979 



Richard D. Tholin (G-ETS) Senior Scholar in 
Christian Social Ethics 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary 
847-866-3877 



¥L James Stein (G-ETS) Senior Scholar in Church History 
B.A., Westmar College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary 
847-866-3952 



Frank Thomas (CTS) Adjunct Faculty Member; 
(MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana; 
M.A., Northeastern Illinois University; M.Div., 
D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary 



141 



Linda E. Thomas (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Theology and Anthropology 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, New York; 
Ph.D., American University 

Mark Thomsen (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
Missions; Director of Graduate Studies 
B.A., Dana College; B.D., Trinity Theological 
Seminary, Blair, Neb.; Th.M, Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University 
7733-256-0763 mthomsen@lstc.edu 

John Tolley (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., University of Indianapolis; M.M., Christian 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., New York University 

Barbara B. Troxell (G-ETS) Assistant Professor 
of Practical Theology; Director of Field Education 
and Spiritual Formation 
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; study: Graduate Theological 
Union; Pacific School of Religion; University of 
Edinburgh 
847-866-3933 

Ruth A. Tucker (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Mission 

B.A., LeTourneau College; M.A., Baylor University; 
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University 
847-317-8116 

Robert Tuzik (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department ofSystematics 
A.B., Loyola University; M.Div., S.T.L., University 
of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame 
847-566-6401 



Kenneth L. Vaux (G-ETS) Professor of 
Theological Ethics 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Th., University of 
Hamburg 
847-866-3887 

Sara Vaux (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Allegheny College; Ph.D., Rice University 
847-866-3915 

Osvaldo D. Vena (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament Interpretation; Director of the 
Center for Hispanic Ministries 
B.Th., Buenos Aires Bible Institute; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Instituto Superior 
Evangel ico de Estudios Teologicos 
847-866-3867 o-vena@nwu.edu 

DwightW.Vogel (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Ministry 

B.A., Westmar College; A.M., Boston University; 
B.D., Andover Newton Theological School; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 
847-866-3875 dvogeI@nwu.edu 

Linda J. Vogel (G-ETS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.S., Boston University; M.R.E., Andover Newton 
Theological School; Ph.D., University of Iowa 
847-866-3954 lvogel@nwu.edu 

Harold Vogelaar (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
World Religions 

B.A, Central College; B.D.,New Brunswick Theological 
Seminary; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

773-256-0755 hvogelaa@lstc.edu 



Larry Ulrich (CTS) Clinical Faculty 

B.A., Manchester College, Indiana; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; M.T.S., University of 
Dubuque Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary 

Franz Jozef van Beeck, S.J. (MS) Paluch Chair, 
Department ofSystematics 
Ph.D., Universiteit van Amsterdam 
847-566-6401 

Willem Arie VanGemeren (TEDS) Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., University of Illinois, Chicago; B.D., 
Westminster Theological Seminary; MA., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 
847-317-8144 



Paul H. Wachdorf (MS) Associate Dean of 
Formation; Director of Prayer Formation 
B.S., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.C.Sp., 
Creighton University 
847-566-6401 

PaulWadell,C.P. (CTU) Professor of Ethics 
B. A., Bellarmine College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D., University ofNotre Dame 
773-753-5359 

Walter Wangerin, Jr. (LSTC) Adjunct Professor 
of Theology and Literature 
B.A., Concordia Senior College, Ft. Wayne, Ind.; 
M.A., Miami University; M.Div., Christ Seminary- 
Seminex 



142 



Ted W. Ward (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Mission; G. W. A Idee n Chair of 
International Studies and Mission 
B.Mus.Ed., Wheaton College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Florida 
847-317-8058 

Bruce A. Ware (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
B.A., Whitworth College; M.Div., Th.M, Western 
Conservative Baptist Seminary; M.A., University of 
Washington; Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary 
847-317-8091 bware@trin.edu 

Gregory L.Waybright (TEDS) President 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Wheaton College; 
M.A., Wheaton Graduate School; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Marquette University 
847-317-8001 gwaybrig@trin.edu 

Raymond J. Webb (MS) Chairperson and 
Director, Department of Pastoral Internships; 
Director, Newly Ordained Program; Associate 
Dean of Formation 

S.T.B., A.M., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago 
847-566-6401 

Robert Webber (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Theology and Worship 

B.A., Bob Jones University; B.D., Reformed 
Episcopal Seminary; Th.M., Covenant Theological 
Seminary; Th.D., Concordia Theological Seminary 
630-510-8905 

Timothy P. Weber (NBTS) Dean; Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.Div., 
Fuller Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 
630-620-2 1 03 tpweber@northern.seminary.edu 

C.JohnWeborg (NPTS) Professor of Theology 
A.B., University of Nebraska; B.D., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and Northwestern University 
773-244-6231 

Herold D. Weiss (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., Southern Mississippi College; M.A., B.D., 
Andrews University; Ph.D., Duke University; study: 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Pontifical 
Biblical Institute 
219-284-4505 



Wayne C. Weld (NPTS) Professor of Missions 
A.B., University of Washington; B.D., M.A., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; study: 
North Park Theological Seminary 
773-244-6230 WeldDone@aol.com 

MarkW. Wendorf (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Urban Ministry 

B.A., Alma College; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary 
773-947-6326 

MonaWest (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Louisiana College; M.Div., Ph.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary 

Vitor Westhelle (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.Th., Faculdade de Teologia da IECLB, Sao 
Leopoldo, Brazil; Th.M., Th.D., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago 
773-256-0764 vwesthel@lstc.edu 

Walter W.Whitehouse (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Christian Music 

B.A., Trinity College, Hartford; M.Mus., 
Northwestern University; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary 

James E.Will (G-ETS) Henry Pfeiffer Professor 
of Systematic Theology 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Columbia University and Union Theological 
Seminary 
847-866-3963 

Douglas E. Wingeier (G-ETS) Senior Scholar in 
Practical Theology 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University 
847-866-3929 dougwin@nwu.edu 

Bartholomew S. Winters (MS) Dean of Formation 
M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; Ph.D., 
Gregorian University 
847-566-6401 

Richard J. Wojcik (MS) Professor Emeritus, 
Department of Liturgy and Sacraments 
M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.C.G., Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music, 
Rome 
847-566-6401 



143 



JohnD.Woodbridge (TEDS) Research Professor 
of Church History and the History of Christian 
Thought 

A.B., Wheaton College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; Ph.D., University of Toulouse 
847-317-8067 

William Wylie Kellermann (SCUPE) Adjunct 
Faculty Member 

B.A., North Central College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York 
313-841-7554 

Charles David Wysong (NPTS) Adjunct Faculty 
in Christian Education 

B. A., California State University, Fullerton; M.Div., 
Fuller Theological Seminary 
773-583-0220 ext. 18 cwysong298@aol.com 

Robert W. Yarbrough (TEDS) Associate 
Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Southwest Baptist College; M.A., 
Wheaton Graduate School; Ph.D., University 
of Aberdeen 
847-3 1 7-6405 ryarbrou@trin.edu 

Khiok-Khng Yeo (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament Interpretation 
B.A., St. Paul Bible College; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 
847-866-3883 kkyeo@nwu.edu 

Victor S. Yoon (MTS) Director of Korean 
American Ministries Program; Associate 
Professor of Korean American Ministry and Asian 
Studies 

B.A., Hankook University of Foreign Studies, Seoul; 
M.Div., Bethel Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Th.D., 
Graduate Theological Union 
773-947-6339 

Henry James Young (G-ETS) Professor of 
Theology and Ethics 

B.A., Tougaloo College; Th.M., Boston University 
School of Theology; Ph.D., Hartford Seminary 
Foundation 
847-866-3865 



Martin A. Zielinski (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Church History 
B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., Ph.D., 
Catholic University of America 
847-566-6401 



Librarians 

Henry Baldwin, F.S.C. (MS) Librarian 

M.Ed., St. Mary's College, Winona; M.L.S., George 
Peabody College; M.A., Immaculate Conception 
Seminary, Mahwah,N.J. 
847-566-6401 

William Beermann (JKM) Cataloger 

B.Mus., Valparaiso University; M. Music, Yale 
University; M.A.L.S., Rosary College 
773-256-0736 wbeerma@lstc.edu 

Mary R. Bischoff (LSTC/MTS) Director of Jesuit- 
Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., University of Missouri; M.S. in L.S., 
University of Illinois; study: Christ Seminary- 
Seminex; St. Louis University 
773-256-0735 mbischof@lstc.edu 

Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College 

773-752-5757 ext. 246 

Sonia E. Bodi (NPTS) Head of Reference and 
Interlibrary Loan; Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Augustana College; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; M.A., Northwestern University 
773-244-5587 

Martin Breen (JKM) Reference Librarian 

B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A. in Theology, 

Christ the King Seminary; M.L.S., Syracuse 

University 

773-256-0703 mbreen@lstc.edu 

Ann Briody (NPTS) Circulation Librarian 

B.A., Marquette University; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College Graduate School of Library and Information 
Science 
773-244-5586 



Dennis Zalecki (MS) Associate Dean of Formation 
B.A., Niles College of Loyola University; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., 
Middlebury College 
847-566-6401 



Alva R. Caldwell (G-ETS) Librarian for Program 
and Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS; 
Associate Professor of Ministries 
B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; 



144 



D.Min., Mundelein Seminary of the University of 
St. Mary of the Lake 
847-866-3911 alva@nwu.edu 

Sam Fustukjian (NPTS) Vice President of 
Educational Resources and Technology 
B.A., Haigazian College, Beirut, Lebanon; 
M.A.L.S., Syracuse University; M.A., State 
University of New York, Oswego; study: University 
of South Florida 
773-244-5580 

Neil W. Gerdes (CTS and M/L) Librarian; 
Associate Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; M.A.L.S., 
University of Chicago; D.Min., University of St. 
Mary of the Lake 

773-752-5757 ext. 247 (CTS); 773-834-1172 
(M/L) 74454.1073@compuserve.com 

LorenHagen (G-ETS/S-WTS) Catalog Librarian, 
The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B A, MA, Ph.D., M.Libr., University ofWashington 
847-866-3913 lha333@nwu.edu 

David K. Himrod (G-ETS/S-WTS) Assistant 
Librarianfor Reader Services, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.Th., 
School of Theology atClaremont; Ph.D., University 
of California, Los Angeles 
847-866-3910 dhimrod@nwu.edu 

Tina B. Krause (JKM) Coordinator of the 
Ecumenical Parish Resource Center 
B.A., MA. in Ed., California Lutheran University 
773-256-0740 tkrause@lstc.edu 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (NBTS) Professor of Biblical 
Theology and Spirituality; Library Director 
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Barry University; 
MLIS, University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., St. 
Louis University 
630-620-21 15 mainelli@northern.seminary.edu 

M. Colleen McHale O'Connor (G-ETS/S- 
WTS) Assistant Librarianfor Technical Services, 
The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.A., Middlebury College; M.Div., Episcopal 
Divinity School; M.L.S., State University of New 
York at Albany 
847-866-3912 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Director of 
Library; Professor of Bibliography 



A.M.L.S., University ofMichigan; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois; study: University ofDetroit; Loyola University, 
Chicago; St. Louis University; Spalding College 
773-753-5322 omalleyk@ctu.lib.il.us 

EmilieG. Pulver (JKM) Head of Technical Services 
B.A., Case Western Reserve University; M.L.S., 
University of Chicago 
773-256-0730 epulver@lstc.edu 

Kenneth Sawyer (MTS and JKM) Assistant 
Professor of Church History; Reference Librarian 
B.A., University ofNebraska, Lincoln; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A.L.S., University 
of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity 
School 

773-947-6304 (MTS); 773-256-0685 (JKM) 
ksawyer@lstc.edu 

Newland F. Smith III (S-WTS) Librarianfor 
Collection Management, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS; Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs; Associate Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate Library 
School, University of Chicago; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary 
847-866-3897 

Michael L. Stone (CTU) Librarian 

A.B., Harvard College; LL.B., Harvard Law School; 
LL.M., Boston University Law School; M.A.L.S., 
Rosary College 

773-753-5323 

Carol Stu key (JKM) Serials Librarian 

B A., Yale University; M A.L.S., Rosary College 
773-256-0732 cstukey@lstc.edu 

Norma S. Sutton (NPTS) Seminary Librarian; 
Associate Professor of Theological Bibliography 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory University 
773-244-6239 nss@northpark.edu 

Mary Ann Urbashich (JKM) Head of Public 
Services 

B.S., Moorhead State University; M A.L.S., Rosary 
College 
773-256-0738 murbashi@lstc.edu 

Keith P. Wells (TEDS) Reference Librarian 
B A., Westminster College; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.L.S., University of 
Pittsburgh 
847-317-4010 kwells@trin.edu 



145 



LOCATIONS OF ACTS SCHOOLS 

General directions for getting to each area of the map: 

1 . To MS: Mundelein Seminary is located in Mundelein, 40 miles northwest of down- 
town Chicago, and can be reached by taking the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the 
Route 176 exit and then Route 176 west to Mundelein. The seminary is located on the 
campus of the University of St. Mary of the Lake on the north side of Route 176. 

2. To TEDS: Trinity is located in the northwest suburb of Deerfield and can be reached 
by taking the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the Route 22 exit. The seminary is immedi- 
ately to the east of the expressway off Route 22. 

3. To G-ETS and S-WTS: Garrett-Evangelical and Seabury- Western are located re- 
spectively on the east and west sides of Sheridan Road on the Northwestern University 
campus in Evanston. They can be reached either by car via Lake Shore Drive (north) to 
Sheridan Road or by public transportation on the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) elevated 
train to the Noyes Street station. 

4. To NPTS: North Park is located on the far north side of Chicago and can be reached 
by car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system from either Lake Shore Drive 
(north) or the Kennedy Expressway (1-90/94) or by public transportation, taking either the 
CTA elevated Howard train to the Berwyn Street station and connecting bus or the 
Ravenswood line to the Kimball Street station. 

5. To NETS: Northern is located in west suburban Lombard and can be reached by 
taking the East- West Tollway (1-88) west to the Highland Avenue exit, Highland Avenue 
north to Butterfield Road (Route 56), and Butterfield Road east. The seminary is located 
just east of the Yorktown Shopping Center. 

6. To CTU, CTS, LSTC, M/L, and MTS: The five schools are located in close 
proximity to one another in the Hyde Park area of Chicago near the University of Chicago. 
They can be reached by car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system from either 
Lake Shore Drive (south) or the Dan Ryan Expressway (1-90/94), and by public transpor- 
tation on either the CTA elevated train or the Illinois Central to the respective 55th Street 
stations and connecting buses. 



148 



on 



4 MILES 



Legend: 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

M/L Meadville Lombard Theological School 

MS Mundelein Seminary 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

NBTS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

S-WTS Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 



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